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Old 02-04-2014, 03:47 PM
 
2,721 posts, read 3,430,954 times
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After the Contamination maps of your last post, of course. How can a belief that only Kelly is the only polluted spot be valid ?
The Exxon Terminal, The Refinery on the southside, the Chrome Plate Plant, are three other places
that I recall offhand. Minimal.
Minimzation is not needed, the levels of violation stated minimal non-compliance status with EPA stats. If at all.
Houston ? Houston is nortoriously filthy atmospherically.
I can still recall not knowing what contaminant was going to be exposed in some areas, what toxins, what color soil (crazy unnatural soil colors, blended ), what odor or toxic gas.
Gen. Motors nor Ford knows exactly, entirely what was buried within the boundaries of their properties. Who kept records of chemical disposal in the old pre-EPA days?
What was beneath the surface? Not one soul. Maybe a long gone one might.
San Antonio. Astonishingly clean. So few sites of contamination shown on maps-because of us being a non-industrial,non-manufacturing town. There are many cities a fraction of our size with far more sites of contamination.
Yes, we are super clean, especially for a city of its' size. Squeaky clean. Amazing compared to some places.
Atmospheric contamination is from auto exhaust. No industrial stink. No sulfurous odor, no big city asthma in kids caused by pollutants, only cedar fever.
No coal fired generating plants
No soot stained buildings nor overpasses , no smokestacks billowing contaminants, no rivers to dump industrial waste into.
I did not see any signif. mercury or copper levels in my brief perusal of your maps. Toxic as hell.
No PCBs. Polychlorinatedbyphenyls. A very, good thing.
No shallow water table here- to entirely pollute from one single source through leaching (lateral movement) of chemicals spilled into the water table. A very ,very good thing exists, an aquifer..here. Mostly ag. contaminants.
Very very clean water here, comparatively speaking.
We are superb. Environmentally speaking.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Merovee View Post
Agreeing that overall we are cleaner than Houston when adding in air quality.

Disagreeing with the belief that only Kelly is polluted or the minimization of the other reported pollution in town.

It is not as if there are two options alone (we are clean or we are dirty). We are cleaner than Houston but that doesn't make us super clean all by itself.

Last edited by huckster; 02-04-2014 at 04:09 PM..
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Old 02-04-2014, 04:12 PM
 
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Default Of Course,

There is Mitchell lake on the southside. A nice bird sanctuary.
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Old 02-04-2014, 07:20 PM
 
2,721 posts, read 3,430,954 times
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Default The Texas State Slogan from a few years back ,

"It's Like a hole "Nuther ****ry".
Quote:
Originally Posted by rynetwo View Post
It's all perspective.

If you live in Alamo Heights this city is clean. If you live in Rodgers Ranch this city is clean. If you live behind Northstar Mall this city is dirty.

The thing about San Antonio is freeway city scape is awful. (With the exception of 1604 and 281 between the airport and DT) The access road system, which I love, does not really lend itself to a nice picture of any Texas city. If you drive on a Pheonix freeway you might think you were in a pristine desert city but then you leave the buried freeway and get to street level. If you don't care for Mexicans, drought, or culture then San Antonio is not for you...
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Old 02-05-2014, 10:29 PM
 
Location: North Central S.A.
1,221 posts, read 2,325,581 times
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C'mon guys, for the 9th (I think?) largest city in the states, we are doing pretty good environmentally. Yes, you will see a dirty diaper, a big gulp cup in the Walmart parking lot. But, overall, we are not Detroit or New Orleans.
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Old 02-05-2014, 10:34 PM
 
Location: North Central S.A.
1,221 posts, read 2,325,581 times
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according to Forbes...we are cleaner than NYC, LA, Knoxville, TN, Cleveland, San Diego, D.C., Indianapolis, Salt Lake City, Fresno, etc.

http://www.forbes.com/pictures/mef45...ntsville-tx-2/
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Old 02-06-2014, 04:37 AM
 
520 posts, read 604,810 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by huckster View Post
After the Contamination maps of your last post, of course. How can a belief that only Kelly is the only polluted spot be valid ?
The Exxon Terminal, The Refinery on the southside, the Chrome Plate Plant, are three other places
that I recall offhand. Minimal.
Minimzation is not needed, the levels of violation stated minimal non-compliance status with EPA stats. If at all.
Houston ? Houston is nortoriously filthy atmospherically.
I can still recall not knowing what contaminant was going to be exposed in some areas, what toxins, what color soil (crazy unnatural soil colors, blended ), what odor or toxic gas.
Gen. Motors nor Ford knows exactly, entirely what was buried within the boundaries of their properties. Who kept records of chemical disposal in the old pre-EPA days?
What was beneath the surface? Not one soul. Maybe a long gone one might.
San Antonio. Astonishingly clean. So few sites of contamination shown on maps-because of us being a non-industrial,non-manufacturing town. There are many cities a fraction of our size with far more sites of contamination.
Yes, we are super clean, especially for a city of its' size. Squeaky clean. Amazing compared to some places.
Atmospheric contamination is from auto exhaust. No industrial stink. No sulfurous odor, no big city asthma in kids caused by pollutants, only cedar fever.
No coal fired generating plants
No soot stained buildings nor overpasses , no smokestacks billowing contaminants, no rivers to dump industrial waste into.
I did not see any signif. mercury or copper levels in my brief perusal of your maps. Toxic as hell.
No PCBs. Polychlorinatedbyphenyls. A very, good thing.
No shallow water table here- to entirely pollute from one single source through leaching (lateral movement) of chemicals spilled into the water table. A very ,very good thing exists, an aquifer..here. Mostly ag. contaminants.
Very very clean water here, comparatively speaking.
We are superb. Environmentally speaking.
Note that the map posted consisted of air contamination reports. Having working worked IT in a glass manufacturing plant up North I can lend some insight on how that plays out. As it was explained to me, a reportable incident occurs anytime the EPA monitoring systems are down regardless of whether anything was released or over limits - because the business can't prove nothing was. Essentially, the severity of the incident is tied to hazardous materials used in the process. I was told that the EPA systems took precedence over everything else in the plant since they could literally cost the plant tens of thousands of dollars per minute.

I'm sure there is someone in the HazMat community who can correct me if I'm wrong.

Last edited by CyVaquero; 02-06-2014 at 04:39 AM.. Reason: Removing redundant statement.
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Old 02-06-2014, 05:50 AM
 
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Default Licensed,

I am licensed and listed in the Natl. Haz-Mat Emergency Recovery national database in D.C. as a qualified first responder and have worked in Hazmat contamination recovery sites. I have let the license expire recently however.

So, I am in the Haz-Mat community. Literally.
I do not know about inside plants or their monitoring of air contaminants and how that works, or the failure of them , this is for bean counters to know.
We dealt with the aftermath of screw-ups. Emergency spills and accidential or- intentional contamination.

These industrial chrome plating places are notorious polluters. Some businesses have absolutely no ethics
or qualms about hiding toxic wastes, the by-products of production processes. It is my opinion that on a scale of enormity- open pit coal mines are the worse of places.
Maybe there is some soil contamination here in San Antonio, I have not heard or read of anything severe.. What we don't want, is for these chemicals to enter our aquifer. Exxon Terminal too has a lot of toxins on site I am sure.
Kelly AFB dumped some pretty bad stuff directly into the ground as I recall. Near or in a creek. Benzene? Don't remember.

Texas plays fast and loose with the rules where the energy industry is involved. The coal fired electrical
generating plants here in Texas were absolutely, absolutely, horribe polluters. There was an extremely good article in Texas Montly Magazine last year, 2013, with the example of how badly a coal burning plant near Dallas ( now shut down) was operating - exposing how badly (vs Poorly) toxic on site pollutants were being handled and how much on site contamination was occuring. Really , really severe. It is a very dirty spot.The regulating agency that was supposed to be keeping an eye on these people was blazenly turning a blind eye on the plant. Texas Energy Commision? Cannot remember the agency name any more from the article. It was an outrageous situation, I can easily assure you, vaquero. Our state is still pretty much clean as far as contamination of our air and soils are concerned compared to other states. Very clean zone we are in. Not as clean as say Nevada, or some other more remote western states but still pretty clean , we are.
The violations near Dallas there at the Electr. plant were emormous. They just hated to shut it down. Even I, was amazed to read about how bad this was in Texas Monthly, July Issue..? on how that contamination was allowed to occur. Maybe it was a 2012 issue. ?

I have not seen any Govt. publications listing soil contamination sites for Texas. I would imagine a list of sites can be found online. Maybe we do not want to know. We should.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CyVaquero View Post
Note that the map posted consisted of air contamination reports. Having working worked IT in a glass manufacturing plant up North I can lend some insight on how that plays out. As it was explained to me, a reportable incident occurs anytime the EPA monitoring systems are down regardless of whether anything was released or over limits - because the business can't prove nothing was. Essentially, the severity of the incident is tied to hazardous materials used in the process. I was told that the EPA systems took precedence over everything else in the plant since they could literally cost the plant tens of thousands of dollars per minute.

I'm sure there is someone in the HazMat community who can correct me if I'm wrong.
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Old 02-06-2014, 06:06 AM
Status: "Amused by Blue" (set 14 days ago)
 
14,628 posts, read 31,224,020 times
Reputation: 6683
I just went to my neighbor's house. She hasn't vacuumed in a week and she could stand to turn on a Scentsy or two. I don't feel so bad now. My house looks great compared to hers. Just don't look in this room......or my kitchen!
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Old 02-06-2014, 11:31 AM
 
2,097 posts, read 1,830,095 times
Reputation: 2202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buffyfan View Post
according to Forbes...we are cleaner than NYC, LA, Knoxville, TN, Cleveland, San Diego, D.C., Indianapolis, Salt Lake City, Fresno, etc.

Houston-Baytown-Huntsville, TX - In Photos: America's Dirtiest Cities - Forbes

To put things in perspective, the inside of a dumpster, behind a biomedical waste facility, in Texas, in July, during the peak of a sanitation worker's strike is cleaner than Cleveland.
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Old 02-06-2014, 02:52 PM
 
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Default Cuyahoga River,

The Cuyahoga River nearby Cleveland is famous for having caught on fire. Cleveland is a very polluted area alright.
That is pretty bad water pollution when a river can catch fire.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TXStrat View Post
To put things in perspective, the inside of a dumpster, behind a biomedical waste facility, in Texas, in July, during the peak of a sanitation worker's strike is cleaner than Cleveland.
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