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Old 11-07-2014, 01:24 PM
 
Location: The "original 36" of SA
816 posts, read 1,475,395 times
Reputation: 636

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Quote:
Originally Posted by L210 View Post
A student ID is a photo ID someone can use to get a library card, but it is not an acceptable form of identification for voting. You don't need a state-issued ID or driver's license for employment. You can use your student ID and a social security card or something else.
THIS is my biggest problem with the whole photo ID requirement - the intentional exclusion of student ID's and other forms of documentation.

Require photo ID? Fine. Just make the ID free and easily accessible - right now it is neither. Forcing one to pay for a birth certificate essentially eliminates the "free" part.

Regarding the "not getting very far" comment, my wife did not get her driver's license until after we were married. She went through six years of school (2 degrees), and she had already been working (post-graduation) for almost a year (taking VIA everywhere), before she decided a license was probably a good idea.
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Old 11-07-2014, 02:38 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,746 posts, read 3,848,584 times
Reputation: 3195
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montirob View Post
THIS is my biggest problem with the whole photo ID requirement - the intentional exclusion of student ID's and other forms of documentation.

Require photo ID? Fine. Just make the ID free and easily accessible - right now it is neither. Forcing one to pay for a birth certificate essentially eliminates the "free" part.

Regarding the "not getting very far" comment, my wife did not get her driver's license until after we were married. She went through six years of school (2 degrees), and she had already been working (post-graduation) for almost a year (taking VIA everywhere), before she decided a license was probably a good idea.
Last I checked you can't buy alcohol or tobacco with a student Id.

You can't board and airplane with one either.
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Old 11-07-2014, 03:02 PM
 
Location: The "original 36" of SA
816 posts, read 1,475,395 times
Reputation: 636
Quote:
Originally Posted by rynetwo View Post
Last I checked you can't buy alcohol or tobacco with a student Id.

You can't board and airplane with one either.
And your point is?

My wife saw the effects of alcoholism with her grandparents (she grew up a block away from them and saw them often), and therefore drinks very, very rarely. She has never smoked.

Boarding an airplane is not a constitutional right... nor a necessity. In fact, my wife never boarded an airplane until she was in her late 20's. We (or more accurately, "I") drove to a bed and breakfast for our honeymoon. Yes, even in this millennium, there were people who, either because of finances or because of lack of desire, didn't travel via airplane.

So, if a working professional with a degree can get by without a license, why is so unusual for the poor to not have one? Why should they be told that if they want to vote that they have to pony up some cash for a proper birth certificate and take off of work to go to the local DPS station... just to exercise their constitutional right?
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Old 11-07-2014, 03:35 PM
 
7,002 posts, read 10,247,872 times
Reputation: 5390
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapphire View Post
Mi Familia Vota helped register the homeless at Haven for Hope.

Mi Familia Vota helps register voters at Haven for Hope
That's good.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Montirob View Post
And your point is?

My wife saw the effects of alcoholism with her grandparents (she grew up a block away from them and saw them often), and therefore drinks very, very rarely. She has never smoked.

Boarding an airplane is not a constitutional right... nor a necessity. In fact, my wife never boarded an airplane until she was in her late 20's. We (or more accurately, "I") drove to a bed and breakfast for our honeymoon. Yes, even in this millennium, there were people who, either because of finances or because of lack of desire, didn't travel via airplane.

So, if a working professional with a degree can get by without a license, why is so unusual for the poor to not have one? Why should they be told that if they want to vote that they have to pony up some cash for a proper birth certificate and take off of work to go to the local DPS station... just to exercise their constitutional right?
I wouldn't be surprised if this were challenged in court as a poll tax. That was already ruled unconstitutional.
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Old 11-07-2014, 03:36 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,746 posts, read 3,848,584 times
Reputation: 3195
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montirob View Post
And your point is?

My wife saw the effects of alcoholism with her grandparents (she grew up a block away from them and saw them often), and therefore drinks very, very rarely. She has never smoked.

Boarding an airplane is not a constitutional right... nor a necessity. In fact, my wife never boarded an airplane until she was in her late 20's. We (or more accurately, "I") drove to a bed and breakfast for our honeymoon. Yes, even in this millennium, there were people who, either because of finances or because of lack of desire, didn't travel via airplane.

So, if a working professional with a degree can get by without a license, why is so unusual for the poor to not have one? Why should they be told that if they want to vote that they have to pony up some cash for a proper birth certificate and take off of work to go to the local DPS station... just to exercise their constitutional right?
She did not need an ID in college?


It is a simple as this:

Want to Vote? Get an ID.


They even had offices open on Saturday to accommodate people who could make it to the DPS office during the week.
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Old 11-07-2014, 03:42 PM
 
7,002 posts, read 10,247,872 times
Reputation: 5390
Quote:
Originally Posted by rynetwo View Post
She did not need an ID in college?


It is a simple as this:

Want to Vote? Get an ID.


They even had offices open on Saturday to accommodate people who could make it to the DPS office during the week.
I don't recall ever having to show my driver's license in college. Texas personal identification cards cost money. Getting a free election identification certificate costs money if you need to replace your birth certificate or any other document. Poll taxes were ruled unconstitutional for a reason. No one should be denied the right to vote based on his or her inability to pay for something.
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Old 11-10-2014, 04:54 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
8,400 posts, read 20,117,123 times
Reputation: 4435
It's not a poll tax, it is a precaution to keep illegals and non-residents from voting!

Plus, it's not the "principle of the matter" either as starting in June 2013, people without ID can get a Texas Election Identification Certificate (EIC) at no charge!

The Democrats are using it as an excuse for their poor showing at the polls (well, that and Wendy Davis' campaign manager claimed Ebola was also to blame! ).

Where is the outrage over the fact that at least one polling machine in Bexar County didn't even have Greg Abbott listed as a gubernatorial candidate?!?

I for one am more perturbed over that then the simple need to present ID to vote. You can't buy alcohol without ID, or cash a check; why is showing proof of residency such an issue?!?
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Old 11-10-2014, 06:52 PM
 
7,002 posts, read 10,247,872 times
Reputation: 5390
Quote:
Originally Posted by majormadmax View Post
It's not a poll tax, it is a precaution to keep illegals and non-residents from voting!
This is just an excuse. Voter fraud is extremely rare. There have been more people who have had to cast provisional ballots in this one election than there have been cases of voter fraud probably in the past several decades! Protecting voters' rights should take precedent over the almost non-existent voter fraud cases.

Quote:
Plus, it's not the "principle of the matter" either as starting in June 2013, people without ID can get a Texas Election Identification Certificate (EIC) at no charge!
The documents you need for the EIC cost money. If Texas wants to institute these kinds of laws, then it needs to ensure that everyone will have access to the documents needed for the EIC. These EICs are already costing taxpayers money.


Quote:
I for one am more perturbed over that then the simple need to present ID to vote. You can't buy alcohol without ID, or cash a check; why is showing proof of residency such an issue?!?
A lot of people don't drink, but a lot of older individuals don't even get carded. A lot of people don't need to cash checks. You can open up a bank account with just a social security card and receive direct deposit. You also don't NEED a state-issued ID to cash a check. Banks and check cashing places accept many more forms of identification than Texas accepts for voting. For example, Walmart accepts tribal IDs, but Texas does not.
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Old 11-10-2014, 06:54 PM
 
7,002 posts, read 10,247,872 times
Reputation: 5390
Quote:
Originally Posted by ged_782 View Post
Actually the Texas ID card is $6. I think the driver's license is $25.

As has been mentioned, there is a no-cost ID available for voters.
The Texas ID card is $16. It's only $6 for those 60 and over.
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Old 11-11-2014, 05:16 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
8,400 posts, read 20,117,123 times
Reputation: 4435
Quote:
Originally Posted by L210 View Post
This is just an excuse. Voter fraud is extremely rare. There have been more people who have had to cast provisional ballots in this one election than there have been cases of voter fraud probably in the past several decades! Protecting voters' rights should take precedent over the almost non-existent voter fraud cases.

The documents you need for the EIC cost money. If Texas wants to institute these kinds of laws, then it needs to ensure that everyone will have access to the documents needed for the EIC. These EICs are already costing taxpayers money.

A lot of people don't drink, but a lot of older individuals don't even get carded. A lot of people don't need to cash checks. You can open up a bank account with just a social security card and receive direct deposit. You also don't NEED a state-issued ID to cash a check. Banks and check cashing places accept many more forms of identification than Texas accepts for voting. For example, Walmart accepts tribal IDs, but Texas does not.
Sorry, but I just don't buy into the argument that it is so tough or expensive to get an ID. As stated, Texas will issue one to vote at no cost to the individual; and the vast majority of those who cannot produce the documents necessary to get one are individuals who a likely not qualified to vote in this state in the first place.

And requiring the state to make those documents available is ridiculous. Why is it the state's responsibility to do so?

Voter fraud may not be abundant but it exists, and a simple solution such as requiring a government-issued photo ID to vote is not a "polling tax" as liberals claim it is. All I hear are weak excuses, but the truth of the matter is when it comes down to a logical argument against it, there really isn't one...
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