U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > San Antonio
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-12-2015, 11:26 PM
 
1,372 posts, read 1,371,217 times
Reputation: 4141

Advertisements

Yes, if you are going to live in SA you should learn spanish, unless you plan to stay on the north side of town and only eat at the GŁera mexican food restaurants.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-13-2015, 04:30 AM
 
424 posts, read 509,071 times
Reputation: 455
Quote:
Originally Posted by wpme View Post
Yes, if you are going to live in SA you should learn spanish, unless you plan to stay on the north side of town and only eat at the GŁera mexican food restaurants.
Ignore anything and everything about this post.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2015, 05:23 AM
 
1,792 posts, read 2,437,322 times
Reputation: 1421
Quote:
Originally Posted by ggeorgie View Post
Go to H.E.B. (Re-built) Nogalitos,,, same thing...
Hmmm? I shop there twice a week and hear predominantly English. All the cashiers speak English too. Bizarre
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2015, 08:13 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
135 posts, read 183,951 times
Reputation: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by SATX56 View Post
I'm not so sure what is going on... I attended a meeting at my G daughter's elementary last year or year before. They announced they will now teach Spanish speakers to be fluent in Spanish before trying to teach them English.
Your g daughter's school just uses a different model for their bilingual program. That is all. Some do instruction in Spanish 100% up to a certain grade and may include non Spanish speaking students in the classroom, while others will do instruction 50% Spanish and 50% English or some similar ratio. It all comes down to statistics and the district deciding that their students will perform better under a certain model.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2015, 08:45 AM
 
5,623 posts, read 6,415,941 times
Reputation: 3593
Quote:
Originally Posted by m0gwai View Post
I'll be moving to SA with my kiddos and wondering if I should relearn Spanish (took it way back in high school). Will I NEED it? Should I start teaching it to my little tikes?

Also, I'll be employed as a teacher in secondary public school. I'm unaware of the language situation in SA (or even just Texas in general). Are the Hispanic students (particularly high school age which is what I teach) pretty much fluent in English? I only ask because I'm aware of a large Hispanic population, but I'm not aware of if the majority are first/second/third/etc generation in America (which could create more of a language struggle depending).

Sorry for my ignorance. I'd just like to know if it would be a big benefit for my family to learn Spanish. Also, I'm curious to whether I'm more likely to encounter students who speak fluent English or not.

As always thanks for the (future) replies and your insight.
No. English is the default language here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2015, 04:26 PM
 
4,268 posts, read 8,362,307 times
Reputation: 1785
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbeltran428 View Post
Your g daughter's school just uses a different model for their bilingual program. That is all. Some do instruction in Spanish 100% up to a certain grade and may include non Spanish speaking students in the classroom, while others will do instruction 50% Spanish and 50% English or some similar ratio. It all comes down to statistics and the district deciding that their students will perform better under a certain model.

My children's school is a dual language immersion program, based on the 50% model. Each native Spanish speaker is paired with a native English speaker. (They don't actually pair up in class, but the goal is to have equal numbers). Instruction is 95% in Spanish in the first year, with decreasing amounts of Spanish each year.

The idea is that Spanish speakers learn proper Spanish (as opposed to Spanglish) and English from their peers at first. The English speakers learn proper Spanish, and over the years both learn proper English so that by middle school both groups are fluent in both languages (not street Spanish/English). Kids can choose to take the state tests in either language. Mostly, it works. Some of the English speakers, if they only speak in English outside class, know it well but are not truly fluent. Same with the Spanish speakers.

The younger you are when learning a second language, the more likely you are to retain it and become fluent.
it's an excellent program and I'm so glad our neighborhood school has it. We're zoned to that school so guaranteed a spot, but a number of slots are open to lottery with a substantial waiting list.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2015, 04:34 PM
 
556 posts, read 397,696 times
Reputation: 634
I would advise ANYONE to learn Spanish, no matter where in the States you live. Considering it will likely become the international language of business in the next 10-15 years, as well as the booming Hispanic population becoming the minority-majority, it's a win-win for those who speak fluently.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2015, 05:04 PM
 
1,510 posts, read 1,548,297 times
Reputation: 1286
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaka View Post
My children's school is a dual language immersion program, based on the 50% model. Each native Spanish speaker is paired with a native English speaker. (They don't actually pair up in class, but the goal is to have equal numbers). Instruction is 95% in Spanish in the first year, with decreasing amounts of Spanish each year.

The idea is that Spanish speakers learn proper Spanish (as opposed to Spanglish) and English from their peers at first. The English speakers learn proper Spanish, and over the years both learn proper English so that by middle school both groups are fluent in both languages (not street Spanish/English). Kids can choose to take the state tests in either language. Mostly, it works. Some of the English speakers, if they only speak in English outside class, know it well but are not truly fluent. Same with the Spanish speakers.

The younger you are when learning a second language, the more likely you are to retain it and become fluent.
it's an excellent program and I'm so glad our neighborhood school has it. We're zoned to that school so guaranteed a spot, but a number of slots are open to lottery with a substantial waiting list.
Same model as my son's although they had a hard time classifying him as an English or Spanish speaker. Besides looking more Caucasian, he spends a lot of time in MX and gets a lot of Spanish at home from his mom. His abuela only speaks Spanish. I speak to him in English only and so do my parents .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2015, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Mid South Central TX
3,183 posts, read 7,420,333 times
Reputation: 2188
Quote:
Originally Posted by RadiantBaby View Post
I would advise ANYONE to learn Spanish, no matter where in the States you live. Considering it will likely become the international language of business in the next 10-15 years, as well as the booming Hispanic population becoming the minority-majority, it's a win-win for those who speak fluently.
While I advocate for learning second (and third) languages, I doubt Spanish will become the international language of business. Mandarin would be more likely. But English is still widely spoken (well) as a second (3rd, 4th..) language, and secondary official language of many a country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2015, 08:24 PM
 
1,372 posts, read 1,371,217 times
Reputation: 4141
Quote:
Originally Posted by unintentionallyfunny View Post
Ignore anything and everything about this post.
I have been to many restaurants on the south side of SA where the majority of the staff speaks little to no english, and many other businesses, if you want to experience the whole city you need to speak at least some spanish. As many others have mentioned, being bi-lingual in SA is an asset when it comes to employment, it has been for the past 50 years, and I'm guessing it will be for the next 50 years.

For those of you that think english is the official language therefore spanish is irrelevant, might I point out that these types of people are the ones always saying "What did he/she say?" and "I think they are talking about me".

Grew up in SA, mom spoke spanish, dad spoke english.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > San Antonio
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:03 AM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top