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Old 11-12-2015, 11:11 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
415 posts, read 355,154 times
Reputation: 195

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I live near the top of a hill, not far from the SAWS water tank. A little over 100psi.

Nice for watering the yard but I fear it's bad for things / risky in the house.

Toliet fill systems seem to be the biggest victims so far.

Thinking of a DIY pressure regulator install in the garage in series with the water softener rather than paying $1,000 for a dig near the water meter and an expansion tank. This would knock down the pressure in the house but not the outside hose bibs.

A bit of research tells me that 50 psi is optimum.

Thoughts ?
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Old 11-12-2015, 11:18 AM
 
Location: in here, out there
3,064 posts, read 5,553,507 times
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My house has a valve right outside the house that I can adjust to reduce the water pressure. If it's open all the way there's too much pressure, so I leave it half way open.

I think all houses have these valves. Otherwise, how do you turn off the water to do any plumbing work?
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Old 11-12-2015, 11:26 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
11,125 posts, read 20,239,061 times
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There's usually a pressure-reducing valve on the water line. Mine is in the ground near the water meter and the water shutoff. It's a small bell-shaped metal valve like this: Watts 3/4 in. Brass FPT x FPT Pressure Reducing Valve-3/4 LF25AUB-Z3 - The Home Depot

You can adjust the valve. When it quits working, it has to be replaced. Is it possible that you have one somewhere and it has quit working?
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Old 11-12-2015, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Stone Oak, San Antonio
713 posts, read 495,050 times
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100 psi tells me that your pressure release valve is about to blow, and you don't want to be around when it does. One of two things will happen. No water, or so much pressure it will take your skin off. As it is @ 100 PSI you are voiding the warranty on your appliances which use water.

Get it replaced. Hard water buildup is the enemy of these things.
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Old 11-12-2015, 01:20 PM
 
Location: New Braunfels, TX
6,253 posts, read 8,965,318 times
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Look just downstream of your water meter by the street - if you have one, it'll be there. If not, THAT is where you want to install it, NOT at the softener inlet. That high of a pressure can cause pipes to rupture - including the ones servicing the yard outlets....and believe me, if they let go, you WILL flood your house - and insurance will likely deny the claim.

No way that installation and valve should cost you more than $500, tops. If you're quoted more than that, PM me and I'll get you a couple of names you can call. Tell them you want it installed with a "valve box" or "meter box" - makes it a LOT easier to find/access down the road if you need to adjust/replace it.

Charles22, doing it the way you are does NOT reduce the line pressure, they just restrict the water flow while you're using water, then the pressure goes right back up once you turn it off - so you're actually exposing your pipes to the high pressure when not in use. PLEASE trust me on this - and since I don't sell/install pressure regulators, I've nothing to gain by telling you this, other than giving you important information.
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Old 11-12-2015, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,619 posts, read 12,872,096 times
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Considering you live in Stone Oak, the odds are that your house uses Pex plumbing pipe. Pex maximum working pressure depends on the water temperature. The higher the temp, the lower the rating. Because we have constant pressure on the water heater, we have to use the temperature of the water as it comes out of the heater. Most commonly that would be around 120F. The max pressure for Pex at 120F is 130lbs. If the heater is set higher, that drops like a rock. So if you have water pressure at 100lbs on the system, you're pushing it. A PRV, Pressure Reducing Valve, is required. At one time when we had regulations under the old defunct TNRCC, the max pressure at the meter was 80lbs, minimum pressure was 35lbs. But now we are seeing line pressure in excess of 120lbs. Why? Because the higher line pressures keeps the lines in the ground from moving around with our vitreous soils. The movement causes line leaks. Our soils move like the blob which is why our streets look like roller coaster rides after a few wet/dry cycles. So it's up to the homeowner to put a PRV on their system. High pressures are the cause of failed toilet valves, leaking dishwashers, and hose bibbs that leak.
If your house is over 20 years old, I'd suggest buying a water pressure gauge and test it yourself. It just screws on a hose bibb like a hose. Turn on the bibb and read the gauge. You'll spend less than 15 dollars for one and it's yours for life. If you have over 80lbs pressure, you need a PRV. Some of the builders are installing them as part of the plumbing system but not all are installing them. Starter homes might not have one. Recommended pressure at the meter per SAWS is 50 lbs. That's more than enough pressure to run any sprinkler and still have enough pressure for in house use.
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Old 11-12-2015, 02:50 PM
 
412 posts, read 317,729 times
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Despite the scare stuff, 100 PSI is not likely to burst any pipes. Piping is rated higher than that. But it certainly will wreak havoc on your water using household appliances which tend to be rated for 60 PSI max.

You do need a pressure reducing valve. Mine is installed in the basement where the water line enters the house. It is set at 55 PSI. The incoming water pressure is 130 PSI. Because of the high pressure, I plumbed in permanent water pressure gauges before and after the PRV.

Our house mounted outside faucets are fed at 55 PSI, but the outside frost proof yard faucet gets the whole 130 PSI. It has its own separate shut off valve.
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Old 11-12-2015, 02:59 PM
 
412 posts, read 317,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrapperL View Post

If your house is over 20 years old, I'd suggest buying a water pressure gauge and test it yourself. It just screws on a hose bibb like a hose. Turn on the bibb and read the gauge. You'll spend less than 15 dollars for one and it's yours for life. If you have over 80lbs pressure, you need a PRV. Some of the builders are installing them as part of the plumbing system but not all are installing them. Starter homes might not have one. Recommended pressure at the meter per SAWS is 50 lbs. That's more than enough pressure to run any sprinkler and still have enough pressure for in house use.
You need a PRV if your incoming water pressure exceeds 60 PSI, since some appliances spec that as a max.

The screw on gauges are not very accurate and are failure prone. I recommend plumbing in permanent gauges.
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Old 11-12-2015, 03:07 PM
 
412 posts, read 317,729 times
Reputation: 834
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
There's usually a pressure-reducing valve on the water line. Mine is in the ground near the water meter and the water shutoff. It's a small bell-shaped metal valve like this: Watts 3/4 in. Brass FPT x FPT Pressure Reducing Valve-3/4 LF25AUB-Z3 - The Home Depot

You can adjust the valve. When it quits working, it has to be replaced. Is it possible that you have one somewhere and it has quit working?
My house came with one of those when it was new. It lasted a year. I replaced it with another Watts PRV. It too lasted a year. I now avoid Watts products when I can.

I replaced the last Watts PRV with a Cache-Acme unit. Amazon carries them.

http://www.amazon.com/Cash-Acme-2388...ve++cache+acme

I have had zero trouble with the Cach-Acme product. It has been in place for three years without a hiccup.
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Old 11-12-2015, 03:10 PM
 
Location: New Braunfels, TX
6,253 posts, read 8,965,318 times
Reputation: 6339
Quote:
Originally Posted by RestArea View Post
The screw on gauges are not very accurate and are failure prone. I recommend plumbing in permanent gauges.
With all due respect, I'll disagree. I can remove the cheap gauge, install a good one and have a good screw-on gauge. It's been my experience that the AVERAGE homeowner won't realize when a hard-plumbed gauge has gone bad, anyway. Heck - I've seen guys in MY field that would look at a gauge and not realize it was defective!

Bottom line - test, and if in doubt install the PRV.
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