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Old 01-04-2009, 12:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LiveUrban View Post
Although supertall buildings would be a plus, I'm more interested in seeing downtown becoming more populated. Midrise residential buildings like the new Vidorra and Vistana are what I love to see being developed in downtown.
What's YOUR definition of "mid vs. high rise"? Seems like every one I've read has said up to 15 stories is mid rise. Vidorra is 20 stories.

 
Old 01-04-2009, 01:11 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX.
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Actual definition???, but I personally feel like it depends on your city. In San Antonio 20 floors isn't really "mid-rise" in my opinion, but in a city like Dallas, or Houston it certainly would be.
 
Old 01-04-2009, 01:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TX_AGGIE13 View Post
Actual definition???, but I personally feel like it depends on your city. In San Antonio 20 floors isn't really "mid-rise" in my opinion, but in a city like Dallas, or Houston it certainly would be.
However, if I understand correctly there are technical definitions that are used by folks in the various industries like architecture, urban planning, etc. that are universal and NOT dependent on the location. That's why I asked LiveUrban what his/her personal definition is.
 
Old 01-04-2009, 01:26 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jules07 View Post
However, if I understand correctly there are technical definitions that are used by folks in the various industries like architecture, urban planning, etc. that are universal and NOT dependent on the location. That's why I asked LiveUrban what his/her personal definition is.
Hmm...that would be interesting. I do some work in urban plaining, and majored in Archatecture at A&M before transfering and changing my major and never knew that. I'd also like to know. I do know that I have heard of residential lofts in Houston with only 4 floors being called mid-rise. That doesn't really seem like a mid-rise complex if you ask me. I know that from what I learned everything is done by height in feet rather than floors, maybe that means something. Either way I'd like to know as well.
 
Old 01-04-2009, 01:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TX_AGGIE13 View Post
Hmm...that would be interesting. I do some work in urban plaining, and majored in Archatecture at A&M before transfering and changing my major and never knew that. I'd also like to know. I do know that I have heard of residential lofts in Houston with only 4 floors being called mid-rise. That doesn't really seem like a mid-rise complex if you ask me. I know that from what I learned everything is done by height in feet rather than floors, maybe that means something. Either way I'd like to know as well.
True. I have seen it based on "feet" more than stories, tho I have seen definitions based on stories. I've seen "high rise" classified as over 200 feet. Is that what you learned at A&M? If that is the correct definition, then Vidorra would be "high rise". Gotta look for the tech specs on height. Since the first floor has a ceiling height of like 14 feet (IIRC), each unit is 10' ceilings, and the floors are like 10" of concrete ~ well, that adds up to well over 200'.
 
Old 01-04-2009, 01:34 PM
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Location: Ohio
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According to a real estate web site (found with a Google search for "define mid-rise") that it would be against the TOS to link to:

Low-rise = 1-3 stories
Mid-rise = 4-15 stories
High-rise = 16+ stories
 
Old 01-04-2009, 01:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bowie View Post
According to a real estate web site (found with a Google search for "define mid-rise") that it would be against the TOS to link to:

Low-rise = 1-3 stories
Mid-rise = 4-15 stories
High-rise = 16+ stories
'Zactly. And that's the definition on a LOT of websites. However, on a forum/information site (that would also be against the TOS to link ), the definition for "high rise" is in feet ~ 200+. (Have seen it defined as the same many times, just can't find 'em real fast now. )
 
Old 01-04-2009, 04:02 PM
 
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A way to solve this is to have more than 1 downtown.

St. Louis has more than 1 (St. Louis is actually several cities)
but here's a picture with downtown Clayton with St. Louis downtown in the background.
It's the same as if 281-410 was another downtown
http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c2...omclayton1.jpg
 
Old 01-04-2009, 04:07 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX.
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I see where it is being defined in floors, and in feet. I think it's a double standard. I would also say you can call it either way, but the more formal, and professional manner would be by actual height in feet rather than floors. Guess it's all a bunch of he said she said...lol.
 
Old 01-04-2009, 05:13 PM
 
3,468 posts, read 7,751,550 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TX_AGGIE13 View Post
I see where it is being defined in floors, and in feet. I think it's a double standard. I would also say you can call it either way, but the more formal, and professional manner would be by actual height in feet rather than floors. Guess it's all a bunch of he said she said...lol.
True as that may be ~ whether it is based on "feet" or "stories", by every definition I personally have seen, Vidorra is a "high rise", not a "mid-rise".

Which again begs the question ~ LiveUrban, what is YOUR definition of "high-rise" and "mid-rise"?
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