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View Poll Results: What should happen?
SAPD should enforce the law 48 81.36%
I agree with the San Antonio sanctuary movement and would help them if possible 6 10.17%
All illegals should be able to stay but I would not help them 0 0%
I don't have an opinion yet 5 8.47%
Voters: 59. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 05-26-2008, 01:06 AM
 
1,404 posts, read 2,156,445 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scuba steve View Post
Comparing to Hitler doesn't work.

Rounding up millions of people for extermination != sneaking into the country illegally.
How about this... What would you do if you had a family to feed but could not make enough money to buy food for your children because of a corrupt system... would you let your family starve to death or would you find a way to save your family even if it meant that you would have to break the law?
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Old 05-26-2008, 03:26 AM
 
380 posts, read 893,931 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cookiemeister View Post
How about this... What would you do if you had a family to feed but could not make enough money to buy food for your children because of a corrupt system... would you let your family starve to death or would you find a way to save your family even if it meant that you would have to break the law?
I'm wondering if you've ever been in the same type of situation?

I know I have, and I know that my dad didn't go breaking no laws to take care of his responsibilities, nor did he go ask for government assistance because he knew it was not the governments role to take care of his family but it was his own.
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Old 05-26-2008, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Griesheim, Germany
13,805 posts, read 18,845,338 times
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exactly.. that's like saying it's ok to murder someone because your family is hungry and needed a place to live.. or it's ok to jack a car because you need a vehicle.. or it's ok to rob a store because you need cash..
there are ways to get in the country legally and it is completely unfair to virtually cut in line in front of all the people that are going about it the proper way.

BTW, illegal aliens come from all over the world, so the law does not only apply to a certain group..
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Old 05-26-2008, 09:52 AM
 
18 posts, read 23,258 times
Reputation: 16
I agree that the laws should be enforced. Why should this invasion be allowed to continue? Mexico's immigration laws are much tougher than ours and they ENFORCE. However, their goobermint teaches them how to come here and break ours. On top of that, the United States is sending MILLIONS to secure the southern border---------of MEXICO, not the United States.
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Old 05-26-2008, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh--Home of the 6 time Super Bowl Champions!
11,042 posts, read 7,863,606 times
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This is one of the many reasons why 9/11 happened, IMO. We are too lax on border control and illegal immigration. You cannot have a law in place and only enforce it on certain nationalities...the law MUST be enforced on ALL, that includes illegal immigrants from Mexico. Like rd2007 said...there are proper ways to enter our country.
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Old 05-26-2008, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Griesheim, Germany
13,805 posts, read 18,845,338 times
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I'll try to get a little more back on topic here.. I read the article in the paper today and it was about churches or church sponsored organizations. The part that gets me is they are considered non-profits and tax exempt, which should mean they should stay out of politics and the law. Organizations like these that get away from their intended purpose and start playing with fire should have their status changed because they are basically operating a business. not a legal business, but it's a business.. they should also be charged for some crimes too.
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Old 05-26-2008, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC & San Antonio, TX
794 posts, read 2,895,471 times
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I prefer to compare this situation to the events that took place during the civil rights era. During the 1950s and 60s, there were people who felt that the current laws of the land (e.g., segregation, Jim Crow laws, etc.) were unjust. Those people chose to risk their lives and livelihoods to peacefully (and sometimes not so peacefully) object to, subvert and break those laws. The "lawbreakers" were subjected to jail time, loss of jobs, and sadly, many were killed by those who strongly opposed civil rights. Eventually, the rest of the country came to agree with the "lawbreakers" that those laws were unjust.

The point is that those who strongly believed those laws were unjust were willing to take the risk - and accept the consequences - of breaking those laws. I gather from the article in the Express-News that those breaking the law today feel equally strongly that the laws they are breaking are unjust, and that they are willing to accept the consequences for their actions. Will some go to jail? Probably, just like many protestors who illegally sat at "white" restaurant counters in the 50s & 60s. Will police feel conflict in arresting today's protestors? Probably - just like many during civil rights who felt conflict between their desire to keep peace among friends in their communities and the need to to their jobs/uphold the law.

I'm not saying that today's protestors are necessarily in the right, just that it's not up to the police to determine what is a just or unjust law. It's up to the American people to decide that. This issue is merely one battle in a much larger war involving global economic trends and social justice. I expect it will be quite a few years before we, the people, agree on solutions that are just, lawful and widely accepted by all.

BTW - churches were quite active in supporting "lawbreaking" activities during the civil rights era. I am not familiar with the caselaw on this topic, however, I don't think any churches had their tax-exempt status revoked because of their support of these activities. Do we have any attorneys on CD that are familiar with civil rights era activity?
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Old 05-26-2008, 11:54 AM
 
Location: San Antonio Texas
10,646 posts, read 9,429,046 times
Reputation: 4719
Quote:
Originally Posted by CelesteDF View Post
I prefer to compare this situation to the events that took place during the civil rights era. During the 1950s and 60s, there were people who felt that the current laws of the land (e.g., segregation, Jim Crow laws, etc.) were unjust. Those people chose to risk their lives and livelihoods to peacefully (and sometimes not so peacefully) object to, subvert and break those laws. The "lawbreakers" were subjected to jail time, loss of jobs, and sadly, many were killed by those who strongly opposed civil rights. Eventually, the rest of the country came to agree with the "lawbreakers" that those laws were unjust.

The point is that those who strongly believed those laws were unjust were willing to take the risk - and accept the consequences - of breaking those laws. I gather from the article in the Express-News that those breaking the law today feel equally strongly that the laws they are breaking are unjust, and that they are willing to accept the consequences for their actions. Will some go to jail? Probably, just like many protestors who illegally sat at "white" restaurant counters in the 50s & 60s. Will police feel conflict in arresting today's protestors? Probably - just like many during civil rights who felt conflict between their desire to keep peace among friends in their communities and the need to to their jobs/uphold the law.

I'm not saying that today's protestors are necessarily in the right, just that it's not up to the police to determine what is a just or unjust law. It's up to the American people to decide that. This issue is merely one battle in a much larger war involving global economic trends and social justice. I expect it will be quite a few years before we, the people, agree on solutions that are just, lawful and widely accepted by all.

BTW - churches were quite active in supporting "lawbreaking" activities during the civil rights era. I am not familiar with the caselaw on this topic, however, I don't think any churches had their tax-exempt status revoked because of their support of these activities. Do we have any attorneys on CD that are familiar with civil rights era activity?
The huge difference betw civil rights era demonstrations and illegal alien demos is that the battles of the civil rights era were for our own fellow CITIZENS who had every right to be here with all of the rights and privileges of an american citizen guaranteed by the Constitution. the illegals have no such rights. they are no better than squatters. they belong in their own country.
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Old 05-26-2008, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Griesheim, Germany
13,805 posts, read 18,845,338 times
Reputation: 3929
beat me to it weho.. you can't compare the struggle of US citizens to people from foreign countries illegally entering a foreing country. that's an apples to grizzly bear comparison

and the EN article was mostly centered on the organizations providing "shelter"/breaking the law
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Old 05-26-2008, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC & San Antonio, TX
794 posts, read 2,895,471 times
Reputation: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by wehotex View Post
The huge difference betw civil rights era demonstrations and illegal alien demos is that the battles of the civil rights era were for our own fellow CITIZENS who had every right to be here with all of the rights and privileges of an american citizen guaranteed by the Constitution. the illegals have no such rights. they are no better than squatters. they belong in their own country.
The battles of the civil rights era were about HUMAN rights. They were a precursor to America's eventual intervention (through financial and political pressure) in South Africa's apartheid movement, which most certainly did not involve American citizens. I believe we can agree to disagree on this topic.
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