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Old 05-27-2008, 04:17 PM
cwh
 
345 posts, read 857,800 times
Reputation: 109

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JIFTheChosen1 View Post
Until there is a mass transit system developed, unless people start MAJOR carpooling or limiting their trips, the gas price problem will continue. The key is to start drilling at home (I love you, environmentalists) and start building newer refineries. The point is, we have gotten to a point where we can no longer afford to be dependent on foreign oil.
Hopefully, automobiles that run strictly on solar energy or some form of solar power (battery pack?!?) will be developed to eliminate the need for oil drilling. Get 'er done Ford/Chevrolet/GM/Toyota...
The electrification of the car has started. Hybrids are now 3% of new cars sold and most car makers are expanding their hybrid lineups. Cars have basically doubled their fuel economy in the past 30 years and my guess is we will see another doubling(at least) of fuel economy in the next 30 years.

But we are a long way from a solar car. 1 horsepower is 745 watts. With current solar tech, you would be lucky enough to have enough surface area to generate a few hundred watts. However it would be a good method to charged the batteries when not in use. There is a company that will retrofit a prius with solar panels for this purpose, but it far too expensive to really be worth it.
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Old 05-27-2008, 04:19 PM
cwh
 
345 posts, read 857,800 times
Reputation: 109
[quote=manthechange;3897368][quote=cwh;3893140] until gas is cheap again(it will be, oil is a boom/bust industry). THe auto will get better, the new hybrid tahoe is an example.
Quote:

SA dreamer....dream on! Peak oil is here, get ready for HIGHER prices.
Well it appears production keeps going up, so peak oil is not quite here. We may however be near peak demand....

There are still plenty of hydrocarbons in the ground that we can make gas out
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Old 05-27-2008, 04:23 PM
 
Location: San Antonio North
4,147 posts, read 7,239,832 times
Reputation: 1009
Some like the suburbs.

I like the suburbs. I really wish they had a different building model than strip and big box that is cot effective here. People we live in an economy fuled by profit. Right now in San Antonio suburban development is profitable.

Now where is my beautiful Cali girl to tell me what she thinks?
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Old 05-27-2008, 08:50 PM
 
4,268 posts, read 8,385,156 times
Reputation: 1785
One of the nice things about downtown san antonio is that you can live in or very near (10 min walk) downtown and still have a house/trees. We love living in the urban core, except for the lack of grocery stores, which is an ongoing problem.

And we have .25 acres, tons of mature trees. We're paying for it in sweat (home renovations), but wouldn't live anywhere else in San Antonio.

Alas, Europe is not immue. Mr Chaka is European and I've lived in Europe before. While there are still more urban centers and less focus on suburban sprawl, I've seen fields and fields of former farm land be transformed into housing developments and strip malls. They're not as obnoxious as in the US, but they still exist
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Old 05-27-2008, 09:14 PM
 
Location: SoCal-So Proud!
4,263 posts, read 9,717,838 times
Reputation: 1551
Quote:
Originally Posted by 42JetSet View Post
Unfortunately wherever you have a large city, you get "sprawl". Europe, my dear, is not immune! Have you never taken a train (or driven) into a major European metro area? London, Paris, Munich, Frankfurt, Rome, heck, even the water-bound Amsterdam, etc.... ALL have "suburbia". It's less expensive to live there than in the middle of a city (do you know how much it would cost a small family of four to live in the middle of Paris?! Dude!). Strip malls aren't exciting, but what is also not exciting (and expensive) is driving or commuting many miles for basics (drycleaner, grocery store, etc.). And I'm not just yammering. I LIVE in Europe RIGHT NOW. No, strip malls aren't lovely, but somehow necessary. Sub-Divisions (as unpleasant as you think they are) house the people that keep the city's industries functioning. It is not practical nor logical to think a city can progress without it.
42JetSet mentioned that earlier in the thread.
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Old 05-27-2008, 09:45 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, Texas
634 posts, read 2,708,811 times
Reputation: 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpoiledWife View Post
I love all the suburban sprawl.

Beautiful homes, beautiful people.

Living in a dense urban area is just plain gross.
Yeah and what about the pollution it causes to drive to your workplace, the land it takes up that was once natural...
England does well with building on land that was already developed in the past. They aren't really going into the countryside to build. You don't see huge land consuming shopping centers developed right out of former countryside like you do here.

Also, everything including the shopping is usually located in the downtown areas throughout most of Europe. Public transportation and walking make sure that their economy is stable. They have what... $8 per gallon over there?

It's pretty sad when people don't consider the effects on our planet with our "American" lifestyle. No wonder people hate us, we have a terrible attitude and are still waying down the earth with our wastefulness.

With higher gas prices, I'm hoping this will knock off that ignorant mind set.

I'm not blaming any of you... it's the way our country was planned. Unfortunately we can't keep on living this lifestyle forever unless alternative fuel is developed pronto.
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Old 05-27-2008, 09:59 PM
 
4,268 posts, read 8,385,156 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hyun-Soo View Post
Yeah and what about the pollution it causes to drive to your workplace, the land it takes up that was once natural...
England does well with building on land that was already developed in the past. They aren't really going into the countryside to build. You don't see huge land consuming shopping centers developed right out of former countryside like you do here.

Also, everything including the shopping is usually located in the downtown areas throughout most of Europe. Public transportation and walking make sure that their economy is stable. They have what... $8 per gallon over there?

It's pretty sad when people don't consider the effects on our planet with our "American" lifestyle. No wonder people hate us, we have a terrible attitude and are still waying down the earth with our wastefulness.

With higher gas prices, I'm hoping this will knock off that ignorant mind set.

I'm not blaming any of you... it's the way our country was planned. Unfortunately we can't keep on living this lifestyle forever unless alternative fuel is developed pronto.
I'mm with you 100%, but unfortunately I have to disagree that Europe isn't experiencing the horrible suburban sprawl. overall housing is still much more dense in the US, but driving across Europe you see big swaths of former farm land turned over to mega-stores and strip malls. A lot of land is protected, but the strip malls have arrived.
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Old 05-27-2008, 10:09 PM
 
Location: SoCal-So Proud!
4,263 posts, read 9,717,838 times
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So, which one is it? One person saying vast amounts of land being cleared...the other saying the opposite (building on land that was already built on in the past). From my experiences in Europe, I have seen some sprawl..but not much.
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Old 05-27-2008, 10:17 PM
 
4,268 posts, read 8,385,156 times
Reputation: 1785
FCF - both. I've lived in England and spent a ton of time in Switzerland.

In both countries, for the most part, farmland is protected and not being built on in the way it is in the US. You don't see nearly the type of sprawl you see here. However, I've seen more than I care to of strip malls and suburbs to in both countries.

houses are still built as semi-detached or terraced rather than detached as they are in the US, but there are plenty of suburbs outside every large European city.

Drive up the highway (can't remember the #) from Geneva to Lausanne, then split off north towards Neuchatal, and you'll see TONS of strip malls. They tend not to be as ubiquitous as we've seen in SA, but they're still all around. There are little housing developments tucked all over into old vineyards....

It's been a few years since I've spent a lot of time in England, but when I did, there were already major super-centers going up and new developments.

Is it like the US or San Antonio? No. It's still more high density than here, by default. But there are now plenty of 'bedroom' communities where you have to drive to get anywhere.

(FWIW - because we have family/friends there or have lived there, our experience has been a bit different than when just visiting)

Last edited by Chaka; 05-27-2008 at 10:43 PM..
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Old 05-27-2008, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC & San Antonio, TX
790 posts, read 3,623,041 times
Reputation: 516
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaka View Post
You don't see nearly the type of sprawl you see here. However, I've seen more than I care to of strip malls and suburbs than I care to in both countries. <snip> It's been a few years since I've spent a lot of time in England, but when I did, there were already major super-centers going up and new developments. Is it like the US or San Antonio? No. It's still more high density than here, by default. But there are now plenty of 'bedroom' communities where you have to drive to get anywhere.
I've observed the same trend during the last 3-4 visits to my family in Spain (Madrid & Granada). As recently as 8 years ago, there was a very definite cutoff between the city of Madrid and the outlying small towns... by 18 months ago all that space had been filled with strip malls and detached home suburbs. Now it's nonstop development all the way to El Escorial (nearly 60 km away, where we lived when I was a kid). Madrid's inner core is as densely populated as ever, and the increased population has to flow somewhere... so suburbs are mushrooming. It's not quite as sprawled as in the US, in large part because they have better public transportation infrastructure. But they've got the same development problems we have. Ugly. Sad. Reality.
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