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Old 06-11-2008, 06:06 PM
 
122 posts, read 478,549 times
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Mojo, I am a teacher so maybe I can give you some insight. Letter and number recognition is not actually as important as recitation. More than likely, he does know some of the letters and numbers, but has no interest in participating in activities. There are many things you can do you bring letters and numbers into his daily activities. One such activity that I think works the best is getting a clear name tag and blank index cards. Pin the name tag on him and put a card in it with one letter. Every half hour or so ask him what the letter is. Make it a big deal when he says it correctly. Cheer or give him one skittle. Then the next day, write a new card with the previous letter and a new letter. Then ask him what each letter is. I would start with the letters in his name. That is the goal of public school pre-k programs by the end of the year. I would combine the name tag activity with an activity that allows him to write or trace the letters himself. One activity, if you don't mind a mess, is shaving cream or sand. You can smear it on a table or in a pie pan. Then you write a letter really large on a white sheet of paper. Then help your son write it in his sand or shaving cream. Again, use his name to start. Sometimes it just takes something different to make them interested. If he is going to school, tell his teachers about his name tag activity, and they should be more than happy to help you out.

As far as the g/t programs go, you can have a gifted student who goes all the way through school without ever being in a g/t program. For instance, you might have a g/t student who grows more by staying in the classroom it the "average" students, because they can help them. It is important for the teacher to notice this as a positive thing, rather than an overly social student. There are endless theories on g/t students. The MOST IMPORTANT thing is to figure out how that particular child will grow the most, bottom line. For some its special training, for others its peer-work, etc.

There are specialized schools for everything in San Antonio. Starting in pre-school all the way through high school, you can find programs for science, arts, mechanics, etc.
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Old 06-12-2008, 01:05 AM
 
Location: in my mind
2,745 posts, read 13,098,826 times
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I think that it's a good thing that you are aware and wanting this to be recognized in your child. A G/T kid who is not acknowledged as such can easily "fall through the cracks". Yeah, I'm one of them! Or was? LOL.

I was reading by 3.5. My mom was told that I was gifted, but didn't really know what to do with that info. By high school I was miserable, hated school, bored to tears. Dropped out in 10th grade... I am the quintessential underachiever at (gulp) 36 years of age.

So, good for you parents who recognize your child's uniqueness and are trying to do your best for them.
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Old 06-12-2008, 01:10 AM
 
Location: in my mind
2,745 posts, read 13,098,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mojokitty View Post
Haha! I think this is funny because people look at my son in amazement at the way he talks too! He said yesterday, "mom, I can't watch Curious George, it is too disturbing". Then today he said that penguins "salivate". Ummm...huh?



He loves math! He says, "mom, do more!" when we play the addition and subtraction game. He just gets it. He can go off and say "one plus one is 2, 2 plus 2 is four...etc." Now me, I'm HORRIBLE at math! So...good luck kid!

I guess I'll just wait until he is 5 and then he can be tested. I'll try to just let him lead me the way he wants to be lead when it comes to learning stuff. Oh, and keep pushing for those numbers and alphabet! Thanks again!
That's really funny. I have a 10 year old like that (with regard to the way he speaks). He's been that way forever, my mom calls him "Little Professor". Sometimes he'll say something, and my 16 year old will respond "Okay, stop it. You're trying to make me feel dumb, aren't you!"

Actually both of my sons, according to my teacher friends, would most likely be "G/T" kids if they were in mainstream public schools. I'm concerned because they are in a charter school with no GT program. Other benefits of this school seemed to outweigh this but sometimes I wonder if it's the right choice. They keep wanting to put my 10 year old ahead a grade... but I am not sure if THAT is the right choice either. It's hard to know what's best.
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Old 06-12-2008, 06:32 AM
Status: "just keep scrolling then?" (set 20 days ago)
 
14,614 posts, read 31,157,176 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fierce_flawless View Post
I think that it's a good thing that you are aware and wanting this to be recognized in your child. A G/T kid who is not acknowledged as such can easily "fall through the cracks". Yeah, I'm one of them! Or was? LOL.

I was reading by 3.5. My mom was told that I was gifted, but didn't really know what to do with that info. By high school I was miserable, hated school, bored to tears. Dropped out in 10th grade... I am the quintessential underachiever at (gulp) 36 years of age.

So, good for you parents who recognize your child's uniqueness and are trying to do your best for them.
That's so sad! I hope you are able to get back in school (or where you think you need to be--school is not for everyone, I know) and use all your talents. There are a lot of kids out there that are not encouraged, or they are underestimated due to whatever reason, and that stigma carries through into their adult lives. Such a waste of years.

mojo--if nothing else comes from this thread--please take fierce's experience as an example and know that your son is in good hands with you--someone who is going to take the time to lead him in the right way!! Good for you (and him!).
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Old 06-12-2008, 07:11 AM
 
1,836 posts, read 3,332,646 times
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Let's just keep in mind folks that a simple G/T (ie, IQ) test can't and won't determine whether your little bundle of joy is an Einstein. It's theoretically impossible that one source can verify such a thing and, frankly, it's irresponsible to assume those who don't pass with flying colors are dullards.

Some kids just aren't confident test-takers. It's been my problem with the system since I was in it: From grade-school on up, school systems are far too reliant on standardized test taking and not on fostering a child's natural-born abilities. It gets even worse when applying to university.

And this is coming from a guy who was G/T, as well as in Mensa and things like Odyssey of the Mind (in high school).

Did any of these things help me further along in life? No. Did getting a 1480 on my SAT mean anything? No. What meant most to me was simply finding a good job, medical insurance and a partner who is an incredibly fantastic person.


IMO, standardized testing can eat it




BN
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Old 06-12-2008, 07:18 AM
 
1,066 posts, read 3,179,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mojokitty View Post
He is 3 right now, going to be 4 in August. He will start pre-school then, so we haven't had him in school yet. I just think I'd like to get him tested. He just seems very intelligent for his age. I know all parents say that, but I really see something unique with him.
Oh, and we adopted him, so there isn't any link between what my husband and my IQ's or intelligence is. So, that is another reason that I'd really like for a professional to see him. I don't know exactly what to look for with him.

His vocabulary is amazing. He loves to learn about certain things, right now he is especially into the body and how things work. He could tell you all types of things about how the heart, lungs, muscles, brains work. He is very curious and busy. He loves to "explore" and sometimes I need to keep a very close eye on him so he doesn't wander off. His imagination is like nothing I've seen on a 3 yr old. The questions NEVER stop. Instead of looking at fish in the aquarium, he wants to see where the filter is or how it works. He loves to try to take things apart to see how they work or he wants to know what makes things go. He is also very creative with manipulation to my husband and I. He will come up with all sorts of schemes or solutions to get around my husband and my rules. I know this isn't describing him very well, makes him seem like a normal 3 yr old, but I as well as others sort of see something special in him. I'm always being told how smart he is for 3 by other people. I'm NOT trying to brag, I'm just trying to get him possibly into a program that can suit him better if that be the case. If not, then I'm trying to direct him in a way to embrace his intelligence. Thanks for your help and understanding!
Your child seems to have some strong memory and recital skills which will most likely equate to good grades. I am not necessarily sure he is gifted.
High IQ/Genius Level/ "2%ers" is simply a meaure of your problem solving abilities and or logic. TTrue intelligence is the ability to understand data, apply it, develop a solution.
I was a student of the GT/TIPS system (it was called Promise Back then) in NISD. They didn't start identifying/Testing kids until 3rd-4th grade. And you didn't asked to be tested...teachers identified you..you then went through testing. Parents that asked for their kid to be tested where typically ignored. "Not everyone gets to be an astronaut, the world needs ditch diggers too". Interesting only about half of the GT kids in my grade made good grades. I tested as high as 141 on one IQ exam, so I was considered a mid-level genius, far from being the smartest guy in the GT system. BTW- I did not make great grades, I made A, B, Cs without even trying. I made horrible grades in college.
I really wouldn't be concerned with his possible gifted ability at such a young age. If he was a super genius, and was doing amazing things at that age I would suggest getting him into a program, but I don't consider him to be displaying anything out of the ordinary.
But if you really want to get him tested, there are various free IQ test available on the internet. I remember the test they used on us, could be used to test a retarted person up to a super genuis, it was all in the same brief case. He will typically need to score in the top 1-2% to be considered gifted. He should be able to sovle the problems effortlessly, without getting fustrated . Whatever you do, don't push him. Good luck
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Old 06-12-2008, 10:11 AM
 
3,468 posts, read 7,738,325 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Primo View Post
I would suggest getting him into a program, but I don't consider him to be displaying anything out of the ordinary.
. Whatever you do, don't push him. Good luck
It's cause you haven't met him. I have. The kid is brilliant! Seriously. Freakin'. Genius. If he were my son, I'd be wanting to channel all the amazing-ness, too.
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Old 06-12-2008, 10:59 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
1,532 posts, read 3,336,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jules07 View Post
It's cause you haven't met him. I have. The kid is brilliant! Seriously. Freakin'. Genius. If he were my son, I'd be wanting to channel all the amazing-ness, too.
HAHa! Thanks Jules! He's a pretty smart kid...genius might be pushing it. I just want to make sure I'm giving him all of the opportunities there are to help him move along...academically. He gets bored if he is not learning stuff or being engaged. I just want to make sure he doesn't slip through the cracks as just another hyper active, doesn't pay attention, doesn't have a chance type of person. He needs someone special to understand his "energy" and his thirst for knowledge. Does this make sense? Thank you again for those who are giving their honest opinion, it's what I really needed and was looking for!
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Old 06-12-2008, 11:24 AM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
2,397 posts, read 5,846,173 times
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My son was one of those who "fell through the cracks." He had been placed in GT classes in elementary school, but when he went on to middle school, they placed him in regular classes. I wasn't aware of this until his grades took a dive. He brought them back up, but went on this rollercoaster with his schoolwork. I finally called his school to see if something could be done. I was attributing his fluctuating grades on being lazy and just outright rebellion. Turns out the li'l sucker was bored out of his mind! He knew all the work, just wasn't doing it because HE thought it was a waste of time, i.e. "why do it, if I already know it." I asked why he had been placed in regular classes instead of GT and I was told that his paperwork didn't follow him. They wouldn't even retest him because the claim was that he should've been tested in elementary and oh, well, too bad the paperwork was "lost."

Both of my kids had an extensive vocabulary before beginning elementary school, but I attributed this to the fact that they were the only children in a sea of adults at home and socially. No one ever used "baby" talk with them and having mom as the grammar police didn't hurt. *lol*
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Old 08-25-2008, 03:57 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,976 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SanAntoQT View Post
My son was one of those who "fell through the cracks." He had been placed in GT classes in elementary school, but when he went on to middle school, they placed him in regular classes. I wasn't aware of this until his grades took a dive. He brought them back up, but went on this rollercoaster with his schoolwork. I finally called his school to see if something could be done. I was attributing his fluctuating grades on being lazy and just outright rebellion. Turns out the li'l sucker was bored out of his mind! He knew all the work, just wasn't doing it because HE thought it was a waste of time, i.e. "why do it, if I already know it." I asked why he had been placed in regular classes instead of GT and I was told that his paperwork didn't follow him. They wouldn't even retest him because the claim was that he should've been tested in elementary and oh, well, too bad the paperwork was "lost."

Both of my kids had an extensive vocabulary before beginning elementary school, but I attributed this to the fact that they were the only children in a sea of adults at home and socially. No one ever used "baby" talk with them and having mom as the grammar police didn't hurt. *lol*
If I were you, I'd consider getting a private test, although it can be kind of expensive, or see if you can get in contact with one of the 'higher ups' in the school board.
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