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Old 08-04-2008, 10:11 PM
 
Location: North Central S.A.
1,221 posts, read 2,318,580 times
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I was wondering if new residents of SA had to adjust to anything in the city. Maybe "culture shock" is too strong of a term...but what did you find different or surprising with SA?
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Old 08-04-2008, 10:17 PM
 
Location: South Central Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buffyfan View Post
I was wondering if new residents of SA had to adjust to anything in the city. Maybe "culture shock" is too strong of a term...but what did you find different or surprising with SA?
Good topic! I'd be curious to know. I've lived here all my life , so nothing " shocks" me.

'
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Old 08-05-2008, 05:50 AM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
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My fiance and I have had some... I'd repost horribly negative one but this thread would quickly derail and become a forum fire about what happened.

But other than that, everything is MUCH slower here. And conservative, but not really in the political sense but when it comes to change in general. Especially when it's change that's outside the established norm. Culture is much less diverse here, but I moved from somewhere with large asian populations along with European (mostly Russian), American, Canadian groups. None of that is so much of a shock to me though but a difference.

All of this is neither positive or negative, it just is what it is.

edit: kinda forgot one real culture shock that might get a little touchy. Here people are a lot, uh... bigger around for some reason. Kids and adults. But yeah it's something you notice right away.

Last edited by scuba steve; 08-05-2008 at 06:06 AM..
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Old 08-05-2008, 07:05 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
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Culture shock? No. Climate shock! Positively!

The two times we moved here it was from Europe (Germany and Belgium), so adjusting to the weather here was harder than the culture. Maybe it was because we were used to moving to many different places over the years that the whole concept of "culture shock" just doesn't effect us. Everyplace is different and has its own positives and negatives, and for the most part we felt the cultural aspects of this city are a positive contributing factor towards its identity. The presence of the Hispanic influence is what one should expect in this part of the world, and the other cultures that have taken root here (German) are proof that other cultures can blend in with the existing culture.

But Scuba Steve makes a good point about the obesity (call it what it is) that I know is culturally-related but to be honest I wouldn't blame culture for it as much as I would lifestyle, as I don't find it to be limited to one race (I see just as many overweight white people as I do Hispanics). I am German, was born there and lived there on numerous occassions during my life. Germans for the most part are "larger," but are much more active and therefore usually in better health than the larger folks you see here. And trust me, German food is just as good and in some opinions (mine) better than Tex-Mex! Same is true with their beer. But again I think this phenomenon may be more related to the climate here than the culture.

But that really doesn't answer the OP's question, does it?

So, for us there was little "culture shock." We pretty much expected things to be the way they were when we moved here, and very little surprised us.

Cheers! M2
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Old 08-05-2008, 07:22 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
1,893 posts, read 4,863,338 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scuba steve View Post
My fiance and I have had some... I'd repost horribly negative one but this thread would quickly derail and become a forum fire about what happened.

But other than that, everything is MUCH slower here. And conservative, but not really in the political sense but when it comes to change in general. Especially when it's change that's outside the established norm. Culture is much less diverse here, but I moved from somewhere with large asian populations along with European (mostly Russian), American, Canadian groups. None of that is so much of a shock to me though but a difference.

All of this is neither positive or negative, it just is what it is.

edit: kinda forgot one real culture shock that might get a little touchy. Here people are a lot, uh... bigger around for some reason. Kids and adults. But yeah it's something you notice right away.
It's the tortillas Steve. Those big round flour tortillas. If you eat enough of them you begin to be round also.
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Old 08-05-2008, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SnappyBob View Post
It's the tortillas Steve. Those big round flour tortillas. If you eat enough of them you begin to be round also.
Good to know... I eat a lot of asian and seafood so I'll be ok. I also like biking and have been meaning to start up a thread about a good trail out there for a while now.
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Old 08-05-2008, 08:32 AM
 
Location: North Central S.A.
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Our city is very dependant on driving...don't forget about that. As well as the tortillas...
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Old 08-05-2008, 09:21 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
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What did we find different? Well the obvious major difference from where we moved & have lived all our lives is the hispanic culture and population....was it a shock though? No, absolutely not. It was to be expected. The hispanics were the early settlers of this area (as well as the german) and that heritage is highly evident. Not sure where you are from, but also the pace of life is slower....I've always lived in the south, so that's what I'm used to (and I like it!). The people are unbelievably friendly and I thought I was used to friendly cause I've felt I lived in a friendly area all my life - but they ARE friendlier here (another thing I love).

Oh, and another thing we've noticed....people eat out a lot (restaurants are almost always crowded at night..we eat out about once a week) AND they bring the whole family - kids and all (back "home" the restaurants are more geared toward adults although there's a few children..mostly adults though). Plus people eat early (restaurants start getting really busy by 6 p.m.). The area is very family oriented (we're empty nesters) lots of kids.
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Old 08-05-2008, 10:49 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, Texas
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We moved here from Va, and we have had some good & bad shocks adjusting to life here. It may be long, sorry.

Everyone is really nice here- much nicer than where we were from. People will hold a door for you, say hello and smile, or just start talking to you while waiting in line somewhere. I have seen some people complain about drivers being rude, but I have found the opposite. (but they really run those red lights!) It can be a shock when you expect the worst from most people.

I have been really impressed with the city's services and accessibility. My husband is totally disabled/ wheelchair bound, and we have found this to be a much friendlier place for him. I wish the river walk was more accessible,(less treacherous I mean, try steering around people in a wheelchair without taking a swim!) but hey- can't win them all. He has been to many more places than we would have imagined and people never gawked at him (he has very noticeable problems) or treated him with any less dignity. That can be a priceless quality of life issue.

The heat is a definite shock- we knew it would be hot but it seems like the sun is much more intense here. Might just be us. We had a clear four seasons in Va. and we miss the changes a lot. It has made it hard to get into celebrating many holidays or simply being able to get a grasp on the month because it just simply doesn't feel like October or January. For me, it has been real depressing sometimes. It is really cool to have nice weather on Christmas though!

Not being familiar with Hispanic culture made it tough when we moved here, to be honest. We felt very out of place, almost like an intruder. We had done some reading, tried to learn more about the area before moving here of course- but book learning is one thing and seeing & experiencing is another. We have found it wonderful how welcoming everyone is and how ready everyone is to explain things and include you here. That has been great. We're still learning. We really love the Texas spirit and pride everyone has here.

Food is certainly plentiful here and cheaper than back east and I have never seen so many fast food restaurants! It's nice to go out to eat but it would be nice to see more parks or places to work off the food too. The amount of stores and businesses is wild to us.... coming from a smaller town, it is overwhelming at times. We like the convenience of stores closer to us and variety of places to shop but hate the price we pay for it. (traffic, lack of scenery)

We love that we could afford our first home here but hate that we are part of the glut of suburbs that ruin the area. We have driven in parts of the city that look just like ours- same type of neutral color houses, same stores, same landscaping, etc. We nearly fainted going through areas where all we saw were rooftops- hills and hills of rooftops. I guess coming from living in smaller cities made that a shock for us.

We're still adjusting, and still learning. I look forward to reading other responses here. Thanks for letting me express my thoughts.
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Old 08-05-2008, 01:15 PM
 
546 posts, read 2,820,218 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scuba steve View Post
kinda forgot one real culture shock that might get a little touchy. Here people are a lot, uh... bigger around for some reason. Kids and adults. But yeah it's something you notice right away.
A buddy of mine calls it "Tortilla Blowout."

http://i154.photobucket.com/albums/s247/theweirdone1971/tortillablowout.jpg (broken link)
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