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Old 03-12-2007, 09:29 PM
 
4,796 posts, read 13,718,331 times
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Cabs is just pulling our leg. That's been going around a lot lately from seeing the little trash cans by a lot of the topics. Boys being silly....

It's nice to see there are grown ups here that can roll with the punches. Nice group!
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Old 03-13-2007, 10:11 AM
 
260 posts, read 1,032,433 times
Reputation: 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabs1982 View Post
I didn't italicize my last post... so whatever.
Boy. You take this hill thing seriously, don't you? Loosen up. All I was really trying to say is that I have seen, in other areas of the country, hills that would seem like mountains compared to those... thing is... they WOULDN'T be mountains. Just like those AREN'T hills.
Boy - I bet Jack and Jill were tired - no wonder they fell down. You'd think a hill is an odd place to put a well, anyway - wouldn't you have to go down even further to get to the water table? Maybe it tapped into a natural spring...
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Old 04-18-2007, 10:03 AM
 
1,740 posts, read 5,187,430 times
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My parents used to have a place in a subdivision named Country Place - on Ramblewood for those that know the area - house was up on a hill for sure. The back side of the foundation was about 12 inches high - the front of the house was about 20 feet off the yard. That is a 19 foot drop in elevation over about a 50 foot span. If that isn't a hill I don't know what is?

Now my parents live inside 1604 in Vista Del Norte up on a hill. From their front yard you can see the buildings that line IH/10 many miles away. They are well within the city limits - up on a hill.

Those that insist there are no "hills" inside the city limites should drive Bitters road going west from HWY 281 to 1604 and count the hills you drive up and down.

This guy makes him look pretty ignorant by saying there are no hills in San Antonio...
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Old 11-23-2007, 08:37 PM
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Location: Ohio
16,816 posts, read 33,147,671 times
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When it floods here, it's good to be living on one of those hills.
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Old 11-24-2007, 06:31 AM
 
3,219 posts, read 7,992,718 times
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To the doubters walk up Wurzbach betweern Fred Rd and I 10. When you out of breath we will bring you some oxygen and water.
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Old 11-24-2007, 07:37 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
8,400 posts, read 20,119,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imaterry78259 View Post
To the doubters walk up Wurzbach betweern Fred Rd and I 10. When you out of breath we will bring you some oxygen and water.
For most San Antonians that wouldn't be because it is a hill...

Cheers! M2
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Old 11-24-2007, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Texas
2,703 posts, read 2,595,836 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imaterry78259 View Post
To the doubters walk up Wurzbach betweern Fred Rd and I 10. When you out of breath we will bring you some oxygen and water.
I wouldn't be out of breath. It isn't that high up in elevation (nothing compared to Colorado Springs/Denver).
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Old 11-25-2007, 11:58 PM
 
138 posts, read 381,678 times
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cabs- I have to agree with you- don't know where you're from, but those are not hills!! I will be leaving my summer home in north/western Wyoming to come down for the winter. Now, up here, I HAVE HILLS!! SA= nope,nada! I miss mountains terribly when I am in the south- it is sort of like 'no sunshine'.
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Old 11-26-2007, 12:00 AM
 
925 posts, read 894,853 times
Reputation: 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilmd View Post
cabs- I have to agree with you- don't know where you're from, but those are not hills!! I will be leaving my summer home in north/western Wyoming to come down for the winter. Now, up here, I HAVE HILLS!! SA= nope,nada! I miss mountains terribly when I am in the south- it is sort of like 'no sunshine'.
Everyone has differing opinions and this is no different however to say those aren't hills or SA doesn't have them is beyond foolishness, just stubbornness.
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Old 11-26-2007, 06:56 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
8,400 posts, read 20,119,473 times
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Quote:
The distinction between a hill and a mountain is unclear and largely subjective, but a hill is generally somewhat lower and less steep than a mountain. In the United Kingdom it is popularly believed that the Ordnance Survey defines a "mountain" as a peak greater than 1000 feet (305 meters) above sea level, a belief which forms the basis of the film The Englishman Who Went Up a Hill But Came Down a Mountain; in fact the OS maintains no such distinction today. The Oxford English Dictionary, by contrast, suggests a limit of 2000 ft (610 m). Mountains in Scotland are frequently referred to as "hills" no matter what their height, as reflected in names such as the Cuillin Hills and the Torridon Hills.
Technically, the definition of a hill is "a landform that extends above the surrounding terrain, in a limited area. Hills often have a distinct summit, although in areas with scarp/dip topography a hill may refer to a particular section of scarp slope without a well-defined summit (e.g. Box Hill)." As such, there are most definitely hills in San Antonio, despite what some people believe...and using the UK Ordnance Survey--widely regarded as the most systematic and thorough mapping institution in the world--standards, there are technically mountains near San Antonio as there are formations greater than 1000 ft!

And before anyone accuses me of being a flatlander, I was atop the Zugspitze (9,718 feet) in southern Bavaria just a few months ago, and regularly hike mountains in Europe!

Cheers! M2
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