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Old 03-12-2007, 04:35 PM
210
 
Location: san antonio - 210
1,722 posts, read 1,644,469 times
Reputation: 235

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Nov, I lived in Stone Oak, funny how you seem to know what Stone Oakians are thinking when you don't even live there, are Stone Oak residents are not that pretentious by no means. If you buy a 150,000 home you're the laughing stock... I'm just laughing at that one. For god sakes, the median house in Stone Oak is priced at $229,400, not that big of a gap between 150 and 230. It's a upper middle class masterplanned community with 700,000-800,000 dollar mansions sprinklied about.

Anyway, here are some homes in Stone Oak priced between 150 and 170.

$170,000


$169,000


$169,000


$168,000


$164,900


$149,000
http://homepics.realtor.com/image10/http/sanantonio/listings/large/059/639290.jpg (broken link)
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Old 03-12-2007, 07:14 PM
 
Location: NW KCMO 64151
483 posts, read 1,424,487 times
Reputation: 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by n0vemberHAWK View Post
I also LOVE Schertz and Cibolo.
I'm moving back to SA in a couple of weeks and I don't know too much about that area (I've lived mostly in Northcentral). Are houses still relatively cheap and spread out, or is it going to become another Stone Oak/Frisco (i.e., typical suburban landscape)?
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Old 03-12-2007, 08:20 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
944 posts, read 2,802,343 times
Reputation: 263
I would say move to Stone Oak (or one of those other areas farther out) if you can. Most of the inner neighborhoods (with the exception of the obvious Monte Vista, Alamo, blah blah blah) are really only very sporadically sprinkled with do-able places among complete trash. I've been in the market myself, trying to decide what to do, and I keep wavering. One the one hand I think I could find a gem in a not-so-great area, but then I'd have to drive through a war zone on the way to and from my gem on a daily basis, and live among trash (e.g., brown lawns, weeds, rusted carports, old toys in lawn, auto parts tossed about, etc.), including trashy views out the windows, which is EXTREMELY important to me to avoid. If my views are of the neighbors' trash or run-down property, it's like living IN the trash myself, no matter how much of a gem I found there.

Then I thought I would compromise and get one of these late 1960s ranch houses. What I'm finding is that these places with their concrete slab foundations have HORRIBLE foundation issues--ALL of them I've seen--and they are for the mostpart run-down too. To get them livable (including having all of the early Americana knobby posts, and wallpaper with the bald eagle printed on it removed) would cost more than buying much newer in Stone Oak or one of the neighborhoods with "less character." For 150,000 you are jammed up against your neighbor no matter where you live in SA (at least to the side). AND some very amateur people are trying to buy and "flip" some of these older ranch houses now, and it's just a joke. Yes, I've watched HGTV too, but come on! The work is so poorly done I'm embarrassed for them. I saw one recently on which they had replaced the front door with a hollow interior door like you find in the newer apartment complexes!! In the end, buy new to avoid the money pit and to not to have to look out your kitchen window every morning at Grapes of Wrath scenery while waiting for your toast to pop up from the toaster. I'd rather stare out at a neighbor's new brick wall at this point.
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Old 03-12-2007, 09:12 PM
 
443 posts, read 1,359,346 times
Reputation: 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by 210 View Post
Nov, I lived in Stone Oak, funny how you seem to know what Stone Oakians are thinking when you don't even live there, are Stone Oak residents are not that pretentious by no means. If you buy a 150,000 home you're the laughing stock... I'm just laughing at that one. For god sakes, the median house in Stone Oak is priced at $229,400, not that big of a gap between 150 and 230. It's a upper middle class masterplanned community with 700,000-800,000 dollar mansions sprinklied about.

Anyway, here are some homes in Stone Oak priced between 150 and 170.

$170,000


$169,000


$169,000


$168,000


$164,900


$149,000
http://homepics.realtor.com/image10/http/sanantonio/listings/large/059/639290.jpg (broken link)
210, in which neighborhood are these? I have a friend that was looking to buy a house, and he like stone oak but he is priced out. He can't seem to find houses in stone oak in the 170's. But maybe he didn't look hard. he ended up in a neighborhood the NE in 1604. He did get a nice bigger house for the price, but of course it's not in stone oak..

BTW, I'm just a little confused, what exactly is the boundary of stone oak?
i know its from blanco/1604 to stone oak/281, right? Is the NE side of 281 still stone oak? is wilderness oak/blanco still stone oak? how about knights cross/promontory?

thanks!
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Old 03-12-2007, 10:03 PM
 
546 posts, read 2,820,499 times
Reputation: 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by m95roadster View Post
I was about to purchase in Stone Oak, but I wasn't impressed at all! It's a decent area with good schools, but it ain't all that!!
Agreed, not impressed at all with Stone Oak...IMO, Stone Oak is the flavor-of-the-month, one of those flash-in-the-pan areas - like San Pedro/410 in the late 60's when it was the "hot" new area. Or Windcrest when it was spankin' new and considered very ritzy. Everyone wants new-new-new, then when its aged a few years, begins to fall apart (and believe me, Stone Oak WILL fall apart soon enough, terrible shoddy construction, even on the more expensive homes), and all the "luxury" apartments begin to attract a less-than-stellar tenant base, everyone wil just move further out, to the NEXT Stone Oak. It's inevitable and ALWAYS follows a pattern, it ain't rocket science to imagine Stone Oak in 20 years as a complete dump.
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Old 03-12-2007, 10:54 PM
 
443 posts, read 1,359,346 times
Reputation: 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by googie2525 View Post
Agreed, not impressed at all with Stone Oak...IMO, Stone Oak is the flavor-of-the-month, one of those flash-in-the-pan areas - like San Pedro/410 in the late 60's when it was the "hot" new area. Or Windcrest when it was spankin' new and considered very ritzy. Everyone wants new-new-new, then when its aged a few years, begins to fall apart (and believe me, Stone Oak WILL fall apart soon enough, terrible shoddy construction, even on the more expensive homes), and all the "luxury" apartments begin to attract a less-than-stellar tenant base, everyone wil just move further out, to the NEXT Stone Oak. It's inevitable and ALWAYS follows a pattern, it ain't rocket science to imagine Stone Oak in 20 years as a complete dump.
I've read this quite a few times already in this forum, it just makes me upset how some people tend to be pessimitic out of something good. So what is your point? Don't patronize new developments? Don't live in new nice community because its gonna get old in a few years time anyway? It's like saying why take a bath if you gonna get dirty at the end of the day. Dude, everything changes and passes away. will there be newer communities? of course everybody knows that, world population is growing. Now in relation to your scientific prophecy 20 years from now about stone oak, well i also predict civilation may extinct then due to world war 3 or global warming if you want me to be double your pessimism.
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Old 03-12-2007, 11:44 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
944 posts, read 2,802,343 times
Reputation: 263
Googie2525, you make an excellent point (I always seem to agree with you). In your opinion, where would one find better values that will not crap out over time? That is, when was the latest decade or neighborhood in which they built things to last? The foundations on the ranch houses sure aren't holding up around San Pedro/410, or in some of the Brady areas in the NW. I literally walked into a number of them and teetered about for balance like it was New Year's Eve on the ocean liner Poseidon, the floors were so unlevel. Reading the inspector reports on these houses is quite depressing.
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Old 03-12-2007, 11:54 PM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
314 posts, read 2,378,987 times
Reputation: 202
We also moved here from the Seattle area a year ago, and we also planned to spend around $150,000. We found quite a few homes that we liked online for that price, but when we got here from Seattle, it was a different story. Long story short, we ended up spending a little more to live in a nicer neighborhood. Since you are planning to rent first, you have plenty of time to search for the right neighborhood for you. Try Westcreek, it's just outside 1604 between Military and Potranco on the far west side. It's only 20 minutes from downtown, traffic is much better than most of the rest of the city, and it's not as expensive, or as crowded as Stone Oak.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mlee70 View Post
Hello,

We are considering moving from Seattle, Washington to San Antonio.
What are the neighborhoods like around St. Mary's University? Also, what about the North Central area? We have read a lot of information, however, without being there, it is diffiuclt to know what the neighborhoods are really like. We are looking for affordable and centrally located neighborhoods to rent in and eventually buy ($150,000 range).
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Old 03-13-2007, 08:43 PM
 
23 posts, read 75,824 times
Reputation: 15
I so agree with you guys, it makes me sad how San Antonio just keeps expanding with surburban sprawl (destroying the hill country while we're at it) instead of people moving back into town and fixing up all the homes, schools, etc. that are already there. Population is definetely moving out of the city or else 9 SAISD schools would not be closing. I understand that it is cheaper to buy a new house in the suburbs than fixing up a run-down one, so i don't know what the solution is. I kind of wish land was more expensive here so it wouldn't be so cheap to keep building new subdivisons and then we'd be forced to move back into the city... but what do i know?
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Old 03-14-2007, 05:50 AM
 
154 posts, read 579,177 times
Reputation: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by emilie View Post
I so agree with you guys, it makes me sad how San Antonio just keeps expanding with surburban sprawl (destroying the hill country while we're at it) instead of people moving back into town and fixing up all the homes, schools, etc. that are already there. Population is definetely moving out of the city or else 9 SAISD schools would not be closing. I understand that it is cheaper to buy a new house in the suburbs than fixing up a run-down one, so i don't know what the solution is. I kind of wish land was more expensive here so it wouldn't be so cheap to keep building new subdivisons and then we'd be forced to move back into the city... but what do i know?
It will happen eventually, emilie. I've seen it happen in too many cities already, and the pattern is always the same. Eventually, the suburbs get too far out, and all of a sudden all those older close-in homes start looking better and better.

When it does, pockets of the inner areas start revitalizing, and the quality/price of the inner neighborhoods start climbing. It happened here in Charleston, SC - you had your historic district, which was always pricey, then blocks and blocks of virtual falling-down ghetto outside of that. About 10 years ago, people got sick of driving an hour to get to downtown, and now those old shacks are being snapped up and remodeled for a pretty penny. It's insane. The lot may be worth more than the house now.

San Antonio has not fully hit that turning point yet, and I can't say when it will, but it ALWAYS happens.
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