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Old 06-26-2009, 10:27 AM
 
656 posts, read 1,687,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobert View Post
What happens when the water table lowers beneath the tap root of mature trees? When we drain the aquifer to the point that our 30' tall oak trees and cedar elms start dying en mass, we're screwed. If I was the city of SA, I would ban HOA's from requiring fully sodded lawns. The grass is not that important, folks.
I'm doubtful any trees with the possible exception of Mesquite send roots down that far. Ground Level at the J17 index well is 730 feet. Currently the Aquifer level is 640, but that is well above the actual water formation due to pressure pushing the water up, (like in a spring). The Edwards is mostly better than 400 feet below ground level. I doubt trees have roots that deep.

See picture on page below:

The J-17 Index Well
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Old 06-26-2009, 12:06 PM
 
Location: West Creek
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watering restrictions dont affect those who live in city limits right? cause I like washing my car saturday morning.
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Old 06-26-2009, 12:34 PM
 
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Originally Posted by svg210 View Post
watering restrictions dont affect those who live in city limits right? cause I like washing my car saturday morning.
It affects all Edwards Aquifer water users, though restrictions are different for non-municipal users. Since they have to cut back a certain percent permitted pumping rights not the detailed watering restrictions we have.

Technically Bexar Met and SAWS only have to reduce to X% permitted pumping rights, if they are able to do that without requiring customers to cut back (For by example using non-Edwards aquifer water sources) then municipal users would not necessarily have to have restrictions.

I'm pretty sure you can still wash your car, but no hosing it down. Buckets only for wash and rinse.
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Old 06-26-2009, 03:50 PM
 
Location: West Creek
1,720 posts, read 4,017,802 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smitty12 View Post
It affects all Edwards Aquifer water users, though restrictions are different for non-municipal users. Since they have to cut back a certain percent permitted pumping rights not the detailed watering restrictions we have.

Technically Bexar Met and SAWS only have to reduce to X% permitted pumping rights, if they are able to do that without requiring customers to cut back (For by example using non-Edwards aquifer water sources) then municipal users would not necessarily have to have restrictions.

I'm pretty sure you can still wash your car, but no hosing it down. Buckets only for wash and rinse.

I use a pressure washer, that does 3.8 gallons a min, on the max, so I use the delicate nozzle which does 1.8gallons per min, so I only take about 10-20 seconds rinsing it.
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Old 06-26-2009, 08:09 PM
 
656 posts, read 1,687,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by svg210 View Post
I use a pressure washer, that does 3.8 gallons a min, on the max, so I use the delicate nozzle which does 1.8gallons per min, so I only take about 10-20 seconds rinsing it.
I suspect that isn't an exception to the rules....
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Old 06-27-2009, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Tampa
3,981 posts, read 9,433,225 times
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any thoughts on building some large reservoirs?

maybe damning up a few of those hills and pumping em full of water
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Old 06-27-2009, 07:05 AM
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Location: Ohio
16,826 posts, read 33,233,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystalblue View Post
any thoughts on building some large reservoirs?

maybe damning up a few of those hills and pumping em full of water
That'd be a tough sell. The underground aquifer water is better quality than reservoir water would be.
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Old 06-27-2009, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Tampa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bowie View Post
That'd be a tough sell. The underground aquifer water is better quality than reservoir water would be.
but, as you add hundreds of thousands of new residents, wont water restrictions come more often?

2008 Methodology for Texas Population Projections (http://txsdc.utsa.edu/cgi-bin/prj2008totnum.cgi - broken link)
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Old 06-27-2009, 07:45 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
1,262 posts, read 1,765,212 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystalblue View Post
any thoughts on building some large reservoirs?

maybe damning up a few of those hills and pumping em full of water
Yes, it has been examined. A solution was to catch the rain runoff during the wet years and pump it over the aquifer and allow for recharge.
Many in the area of catchment were incited to believe that it would become their drinking water and the plan scrapped.[Racial and geographic divisiveness at its best.]
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Old 06-27-2009, 08:56 AM
 
656 posts, read 1,687,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystalblue View Post
but, as you add hundreds of thousands of new residents, wont water restrictions come more often?

2008 Methodology for Texas Population Projections (http://txsdc.utsa.edu/cgi-bin/prj2008totnum.cgi - broken link)
We are also going to have restrictions more often than before 2007 because they raised all the thresholds 10 feet. Going forward we can probably expect to be in at least stage 1 25-30% of the time based on historical aquifer levels.

Note that despite San Antonio population increases over the last 20 years, aquifer pumping has not increased.

See chart earlier in this thread.
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