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Old 06-18-2009, 01:23 PM
 
4,796 posts, read 13,711,684 times
Reputation: 2709

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Quote:
Originally Posted by buffy888 View Post
I think I interpreted his post differently. I thought he was saying that officials can't catch every water-wasting business on their own, but if we see one that habitually wastes water/breaks rules, then we should report them to SAWS so they can take care of it.
Oh...if that's what he was saying, then he's doing the right thing. I just read that he didn't like being hammered when he didn't think anyone was hammering JITB. I know he has restrictions with his cell and phones at work due to security....and he mentioned that he couldn't report from work. I'd say hit speed dial on the way home! Whatever it is...he'll clarify.
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Old 06-18-2009, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Kallison Ranch, San Antonio,TX.
1,668 posts, read 3,351,670 times
Reputation: 720
When we entered Stage Two the EAA told Bexar Met, SAWS, and other water purveyors drawing from the Edwards to cut pumpage by 30% .SAWS crews are busting their butts daily repairing water main breaks. SAWS can't afford to over pump, if so they are looking at fines from the EAA. Who pays those?. We ratepayers do.
Our yards can survive with daily or everyother daily hand watering of course not during the heat of the day. If your lawn is cut 2 1/2 -3" it will take less water to survive. Its too late in the year but those without shade trees need to consider them. The shade will keep your yard from drying out as fast and they wil also shade your home which saves on you CPS bill.

*In my opinion the Stage One Restrictions should be year round no matter what the Aquifer Level is.This was the first year that SAWS is able to enforce into the City of San Antonio's ETJ

Some may say or think that it is up to SAWS to solely police the water wasters. That cannot hapen unless we all want to pay for a lot more off duty Park Rangers, SAPD, etc.
We can and should report water waste whenever we see it by calling 704-SAWS or file a complaint online at www.saws.org . You do not have to give your name.

No rain and those wasting water are putting us in site of Stage 3.

Last edited by wellguy; 06-18-2009 at 06:28 PM..
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Old 06-18-2009, 06:21 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
944 posts, read 2,801,807 times
Reputation: 263
I'd love a local meteorologist to speculate about WHY we have these stubborn high pressure ridges over much of the southern U.S., but they won't. Any mention of climate change would ruffle the feathers of the conservative viewership.
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Old 06-18-2009, 06:40 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
3,542 posts, read 7,524,520 times
Reputation: 3745
Quote:
Originally Posted by hello13685 View Post
I'd love a local meteorologist to speculate about WHY we have these stubborn high pressure ridges over much of the southern U.S., but they won't. Any mention of climate change would ruffle the feathers of the conservative viewership.
I wouldn't blame our drought on climate change. Yes, there's climate change, there's never been a "static" climate... but that is beside point. We just happen to live in a part of the world that is prone to severe droughts, and they have happened several times in recorded history. The worsts in the past 100 years being the current drought, the 1950s, and the 1910s. As I stated earlier in this thread, the lowest recorded aquifer level reading at the J-17 Well was in 1956 when it dipped all the way down to 612 ft asl. (on an interesting side note... it's interesting that the last three droughts of this magnitude have occurred approximately every 50 years).

Why are high pressure ridges the norm here? It just has to do with the Earth's natural wind cycle. See image:


The air has a tendency to LIFT (low pressure) at the Equator (0) and again at the upper latitudes (60 N/S).

The air has a tendency to SINK (high pressure) in the subtropics (30 N/S) and in the polar regions (90 N/S).

San Antonio is located at latitude 29.85N. Some of the largest deserts in the world share this same latitude. If it weren't for the Gulf of Mexico being nearby, we would more than likely be a full blown desert too.
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Old 06-18-2009, 07:40 PM
 
Location: NW San Antonio
214 posts, read 442,717 times
Reputation: 123
People need to understand that you can keep your lawn green by watering heavy once per week. There is NO NEED to any more often than this unless your lawn is all ST Augustine in full sun, which is a mistake anyway. Let that stuff die and let the Bermuda move in. It will take over with only occasional watering and it'll stay green in the nastiest droughts with just 45 minutes of watering every 10 days.
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Old 06-18-2009, 07:50 PM
 
4,796 posts, read 13,711,684 times
Reputation: 2709
Quote:
Originally Posted by hello13685 View Post
I'd love a local meteorologist to speculate about WHY we have these stubborn high pressure ridges over much of the southern U.S., but they won't. Any mention of climate change would ruffle the feathers of the conservative viewership.

Stop it. ANYONE speculating about any topic is accomplishing nothing. Why does every problem have to be politicized? Don't you believe in mother nature? Go read Grapes of Wrath.
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Old 06-18-2009, 07:55 PM
 
41 posts, read 216,280 times
Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by merc11ty View Post
You can still water by hand at any time- this is what I'll be doing.
On the SAWS website it says you can water once a week:
"In Stage 2,once-a-week watering with a sprinkler, soaker hose or irrigation system is allowed only during the hours of 3 a.m. to 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on your designated day."

Last Digit
of Street
Address Watering
Day 0 or 1 Monday 2 or 3 Tuesday 4 or 5 Wednesday 6 or 7 Thursday 8 or 9 Friday No watering on weekends with a sprinkler, soaker hose or irrigation system. Areas without a street address, such as medians and neighborhood entryways, water on Wednesday.
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Old 06-18-2009, 08:38 PM
 
322 posts, read 651,612 times
Reputation: 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by alka View Post
On the SAWS website it says you can water once a week:
"In Stage 2,once-a-week watering with a sprinkler, soaker hose or irrigation system is allowed only during the hours of 3 a.m. to 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on your designated day."

Last Digit
of Street
Address Watering
Day 0 or 1 Monday 2 or 3 Tuesday 4 or 5 Wednesday 6 or 7 Thursday 8 or 9 Friday No watering on weekends with a sprinkler, soaker hose or irrigation system. Areas without a street address, such as medians and neighborhood entryways, water on Wednesday.
What you say it true, and so is what mercity said.
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Old 06-18-2009, 08:47 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
323 posts, read 741,982 times
Reputation: 205
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reallybigshoe View Post
People need to understand that you can keep your lawn green by watering heavy once per week. There is NO NEED to any more often than this unless your lawn is all ST Augustine in full sun, which is a mistake anyway. Let that stuff die and let the Bermuda move in. It will take over with only occasional watering and it'll stay green in the nastiest droughts with just 45 minutes of watering every 10 days.
I totally agree. I took this picture of my lawn this afternoon. I've been watering once a week since the stage one went into effect, and I've had no problems at all. That is all that is needed. Actually, during non-dry periods, less than that, because the natural rain takes place of a watering day.
Stage 3 Water Restrictions (it's getting serious, folks!)-img_0426.jpg
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Old 06-18-2009, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Western Bexar County
3,823 posts, read 13,347,445 times
Reputation: 1905
Quote:
Originally Posted by franklin9150 View Post
I totally agree. I took this picture of my lawn this afternoon. I've been watering once a week since the stage one went into effect, and I've had no problems at all. That is all that is needed. Actually, during non-dry periods, less than that, because the natural rain takes place of a watering day.
Attachment 43674
Someone has a fairly new lawn (looks good). What's with all the drain plugs?
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