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Old 06-23-2009, 09:41 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
898 posts, read 2,273,380 times
Reputation: 490

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paka View Post
Dang...looking at the temps that ya'll set your A/C at I must be part eskimo!
Same here....its about 76-78 during the day and 72 at night at my house. And the heater is turned on maybe 3 or 4 times during the winter.
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Old 06-23-2009, 10:42 PM
cwh
 
345 posts, read 856,115 times
Reputation: 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by scuba steve View Post
Just fine, actually. I think I have a picture somewhere with half of the windows done, but in the daytime the view is about the same. At night they get a bit reflective on the inside though, but the blinds are usually closed then like most people do so nobody can see in.



I did it as a DIY job; it's really not that hard but it's much easier to handle in the cooler months. The stuff came from a place called Radiant Guard and ships from somewhere near Dallas. Whatever you want to know about doing it I can fill you in on...
How did it impact you electric bill and attic temp? I am thinking about doing it in the near future.
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Old 06-23-2009, 11:12 PM
 
1,740 posts, read 5,186,587 times
Reputation: 336
Quote:
Originally Posted by scuba steve View Post
Replacing the windows with a brick exterior would've been a royal pain no matter which way you look at it. The tint should be good for about a decade, then it's time to take it off and either re-tint or go with solar screens. But until then I'll enjoy cooler temperatures. Pick your poison, there are drawbacks with all three alternatives.
My parents home is all brick - but they had their windows replaced professionally. Not sure of the cost - but it was pricy. They had 20 windows replaced. Took about three days to do all of them. Long term they should come out ahead - especially with rising energy prices.
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Old 06-24-2009, 05:01 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
7,629 posts, read 14,345,854 times
Reputation: 18705
Quote:
Originally Posted by scuba steve View Post
Replacing the windows with a brick exterior would've been a royal pain no matter which way you look at it. The tint should be good for about a decade, then it's time to take it off and either re-tint or go with solar screens. But until then I'll enjoy cooler temperatures. Pick your poison, there are drawbacks with all three alternatives.
Acutally no....the company that replaced all 31 of our windows did a fantastic job with no issues and our home is brick. In fact, two huge 6x4 ft windows in our master bath over our garden tub we had them do in the rain glass for privacy, and now they are functions opening from the top or bottom for fresh air, vs the non functions view only windows they were when the house was built. We are VERY pleased altho it was a major investment...I think well worth the money over the years of savings. The house (especially western exposure) is much more cool with this low-e than it was with solar screens we use to have.

We used:

http://www.windowworld.com/

and were very please with the experience and would certainly recommend them based on our experience. In fact we have to some friends, satisfied as well. You are also eligible for a NICE rebate from CPS and I think on your Fed Taxes this year. Check with your tax person on that last part.
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Old 06-24-2009, 06:06 AM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
5,615 posts, read 12,798,966 times
Reputation: 2534
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwh View Post
How did it impact you electric bill and attic temp? I am thinking about doing it in the near future.
I'm not sure how it impacted the bill - I bought the place just over a year ago and didn't start the project until around October. But I did shoot both the exposed and unexposed areas with the temperature gun every day for a while this spring and came up with about a 25 degree difference between the temperature of the bottom of the decking vs. the temperature of the barrier. The temperature of the ceiling dropped 6 or 8 degrees from what I remember. My first year over year bill will come next week so check back then. What will go along well with the barrier is installing a ridge vent at the top of the attic so the superheated air has a better way to escape. It's often a good idea to add additional soffit venting as well.

Scientific study on radiant barrier effectiveness showing 60% reduction in ceiling heat load:
http://txspace.tamu.edu/bitstream/ha...pdf?sequence=1

Another experiment showing about a 20% cooling load reduction:
http://txspace.tamu.edu/bitstream/ha...pdf?sequence=3

Bunches more experiments at this link
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&c...udy+experiment

Quote:
Originally Posted by banker View Post
My parents home is all brick - but they had their windows replaced professionally. Not sure of the cost - but it was pricy. They had 20 windows replaced. Took about three days to do all of them. Long term they should come out ahead - especially with rising energy prices.
I've done lots of research on what it'd take... since the brick runs up to the window frame it would require lots of work. Neither option is pretty if it's to look original (I'm not a fan of the of the insert-style). In my case the windows were installed from the outside before the brick veneer went up. The way they're trimmed out I'd have to either have a mason remove enough brick to access the original mounting tabs, or remove all the trim and enough drywall to get the rough framing and go at it from the inside. Not pretty either way you look at it. To do just everything facing the back yard I'm looking at 18 windows. Double that for everything else if the whole house is supposed to match, although everything facing the front has a wood frame mounted in the brick veneer so they're easier.

All that work because only the bedroom windows get a full sun exposure. IMO a more cost-effective way to go is to tint the windows for now, and plant something that will grow taller over time and shade the windows because heat hasn't been an issue anywhere there's shade.
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Old 06-24-2009, 10:29 AM
 
1,740 posts, read 5,186,587 times
Reputation: 336
June 2009:

Square feet: 3,214 (2778 downstairs / 436 upstairs)
Age of home: 1 year
AC Units: Carrier 14 SEER - one unit three zones (one zone upstairs two downstairs)
Radiant barrier: Yes
People home during the day: 3 (Wife and two kids)
Temp: 77 downstairs on primary living space and 78 on bedrooms (77 at night on bedrooms) and 84 upstairs - (unless out of town company visiting)
Shade: none at all

Electric Bill - $141.76 - 1,572 kWh used
Natural Gass - 15.60- 9 ccf used

Not a bad jump over last months bill considering how hot June has been.
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Old 06-24-2009, 10:43 AM
 
1,740 posts, read 5,186,587 times
Reputation: 336
I just checked this site History : Weather Underground (great info if you get into weather) and we had 12 days at or above 99 degrees last month. So this should be about as hot as it gets this summer...I don't expect July and August bills to be much more than June. Hopefully anyway.
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Old 06-24-2009, 11:35 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
11,933 posts, read 12,806,403 times
Reputation: 17166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paka View Post
Acutally no....the company that replaced all 31 of our windows did a fantastic job with no issues and our home is brick. In fact, two huge 6x4 ft windows in our master bath over our garden tub we had them do in the rain glass for privacy, and now they are functions opening from the top or bottom for fresh air, vs the non functions view only windows they were when the house was built. We are VERY pleased altho it was a major investment...I think well worth the money over the years of savings. The house (especially western exposure) is much more cool with this low-e than it was with solar screens we use to have.

We used:

Window World | Replacement Windows | Energy Tax Credit Windows | Window Replacements

and were very please with the experience and would certainly recommend them based on our experience. In fact we have to some friends, satisfied as well. You are also eligible for a NICE rebate from CPS and I think on your Fed Taxes this year. Check with your tax person on that last part.
Thanks for the post Paka! We're looking into replacing about half the windows in our house. The double panes have split and it's all foggy. Just hate to have to spend all that $$!!
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Old 06-24-2009, 07:22 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX, USA
5,142 posts, read 11,450,589 times
Reputation: 2505
840 Sq Ft Apartment 1 Bedroom, 2 floor apartment building with 3 floors, built in 2006, unsure about unit specs, approx. bill $50-75/month.
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Old 06-24-2009, 09:21 PM
cwh
 
345 posts, read 856,115 times
Reputation: 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by scuba steve View Post
I'm not sure how it impacted the bill - I bought the place just over a year ago and didn't start the project until around October. But I did shoot both the exposed and unexposed areas with the temperature gun every day for a while this spring and came up with about a 25 degree difference between the temperature of the bottom of the decking vs. the temperature of the barrier. The temperature of the ceiling dropped 6 or 8 degrees from what I remember. My first year over year bill will come next week so check back then. What will go along well with the barrier is installing a ridge vent at the top of the attic so the superheated air has a better way to escape. It's often a good idea to add additional soffit venting as well.
I think I am going to to order some the foil this week and at least get the hot half of the house done.

I do have ridge vents, but I think about 1/2 of soffit vents are useless. I have cathedral ceiling one on of side of the house and I dont think there is good path from the soffit to the ridge vent. However, I started to monitor the attic and temp and does appear to be dropping off pretty quickly, so maybe there is enough ventilation up there.
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