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Old 08-18-2009, 08:30 PM
 
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Last year Dolly, which hit the Valley area, gave us a tornado just a few miles from my home. It hit near Steves Ave/Presa St/Mitchell St on the south side. Pretty scary.

Hurricanes usually affect the city in other ways though, as "All Roads Lead to San Antonio," which means everyone who evacuates comes here....

Ike could have done significant damage if it didn't shift north before it made landfall.

But yes, bigger problem is flooding.
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Old 08-18-2009, 08:32 PM
 
Location: AGRESTIC
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First I hope no one is negatively effected by a hurricane, now that I have said that bring them on, we need the rain this year.
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Old 08-18-2009, 08:34 PM
 
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2DMaxx, better to hope for El Nino - just rain, less wind damage, and more guarantee of rain. Except for Dolly, we seem to get the hot/windy/dry side of the hurricanes more often than not.
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Old 08-18-2009, 08:44 PM
 
Location: AGRESTIC
325 posts, read 695,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaka View Post
2DMaxx, better to hope for El Nino - just rain, less wind damage, and more guarantee of rain. Except for Dolly, we seem to get the hot/windy/dry side of the hurricanes more often than not.
Your thinking is correct, but I did move here in September 98... I remember setting on my friends front porch in Timberwood Park (OCT98) and thinking, damn it rains hard down here.
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Old 08-18-2009, 08:47 PM
 
Location: San Antonio North
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaka View Post
2DMaxx, better to hope for El Nino - just rain, less wind damage, and more guarantee of rain. Except for Dolly, we seem to get the hot/windy/dry side of the hurricanes more often than not.
Tropical Storm Erin gave us a good soaking. Claudette even killed a few people in our neck of the woods six years ago.
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Old 08-19-2009, 01:04 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
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Sorry for showing up late to the party., disagreeing with most of the posts on this forum, and for potentially scaring you. None of the above are my intentions. However, that said, San Antonio CAN be affected directly by a hurricane. The thing is, it's very rare and the last time we have seen anything remotely of hurricane force winds was in the 1940s.

We are quite inland, but not inland enough to allow for a hurricane to completely dissipate before making it into town. Hypothetical (but serious) models show that if a category 4 or 5 storm were to strike Corpus Christi and maintain a northwesterly motion towards San Antonio, we would see sustained winds of hurricane force AND possibly in excess of 100 MPH. Now those are strong winds and will do a lot of damage, but I would hardly consider it catastrophic. It'll take a lot more than that to change the face of SA forever as we know it.

Do not let that alarm you, it is within the realm of possibilities, but it has never happened yet. Many places near the coast have suffered that fate and have rebuilt quickly. Just make sure you have a plan for when mother nature decides to strike (which basically means have food, batteries, medicine, first aid kits, etc.). As others have previously stated, the most frequent natural disaster here (other than drought -- for our agricultural friends this is catastrophic) is flash flooding. Make sure you don't live in flood plain. If you do, well you need to work on your backup plans for the next flooding event.
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Old 08-19-2009, 12:09 PM
 
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The hurricane that spawned tornados in northwest San Antonio was Gilbert in September 1988. The HEB on Huebner and Babcock was damaged and some apartments in the Medical Center area had significant damage.
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Old 11-09-2011, 04:31 AM
 
Location: Texas
4,346 posts, read 5,719,899 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowglobe View Post
The hurricane that spawned tornados in northwest San Antonio was Gilbert in September 1988. The HEB on Huebner and Babcock was damaged and some apartments in the Medical Center area had significant damage.
I was outside my home in Babcock north subdivision seconds before debris began hitting my house. My wife looked out the window and saw a tree up in the sky and that's when we realized what was happening. It did a lot of damage in both Babcock north and Oxbow subdivisions.

I heard mayor Henry Cisneros downplaying the strength of the twisters on the radio but my neighbors garage was GONE, sucked right off his house. A small boat was deposited in my backyard as well as a big heavy wooden porch swing. Our porch swing was gone as well as our porch pillars. Large, very large trees were uprooted and one stood upside down on it's branches in the middle of the next street with it's roots 30 or so feet in the air. Weirdest thing I've ever seen. Small flying debris damaged our house and car. Another neighbor had a gaping hole in his roof and yet another neighbor's house burned completely down as debris snapped his gas meter off and a downed power line fell on his metal shed sparking and igniting the open gas line under the eve of the house. We stood there helplessly and watched it burn.

True, these were small twisters but people could have easily been killed if in the wrong place at the wrong time. A small piece of roof decking and shingle punched a hole through my 3 year old daughters bedroom wall just inches from her bed (we were all taking shelter in the bathroom at the time). I gained a lot of respect and fear for even small twisters. Unbelievable experience.
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Old 11-09-2011, 05:10 AM
Status: "Amused by Blue" (set 11 days ago)
 
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Try finding a loaf of bread or a D battery if there is a sliiiiiiiight chance of heavy rain from a hurricane.
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Old 11-09-2011, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Universal City, Texas
3,109 posts, read 8,717,254 times
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Please don't forget Hurricane Ike. We were lucky that the hurricane was east of us. Ike went north and caused great destruction in several states including Indiana. It was a rare storm but it packed a wollop!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_Ike

On September 14, after Ike became extratropical and was enhanced by an upper level shortwave trough, a major wind event took place across the lower and middle Ohio Valley and lower Great Lakes, and significant rainfall and flooding took place to the west. Several areas in Illinois and Indiana, already flooded by the frontal boundary to the north, saw significant additional rainfall.[120] Due to flooding in Chicago, Todd Stroger declared a state of emergency for Cook County due to flooding of the Des Plaines River. Hurricane-force wind gusts were reported to the east of the center across parts of Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio and Pennsylvania with significant wind damage including structural damage to buildings and trees. The Louisville area declared a state of emergency due to major damage, and the Louisville International Airport was closed temporarily. A LG&E spokesperson said that this was the worst power outage in 30 years.[121] Later in the day, a statewide state of emergency was declared in Kentucky by Governor Steve Beshear.[122] Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky International Airport was also temporarily shut down, and the control tower was evacuated. In Shannon County Missouri, an outdoor music festival was taking place; though a large tree fell causing a power outage and Sinking Creek was high there were no injuries reported. In Cincinnati, numerous reports of roof damage were called in to law enforcement, and on September 15, most of the schools in Hamilton County, Butler County, and Clermont County had classes cancelled because of power outages, some of which lasted seven days. Wind gusts of 75 miles per hour (121 km/h) were recorded at Columbus, which is equivalent to sustained wind levels found in a Category 1 hurricane.[123] Additionally, a state of emergency was declared in Ohio on Monday.[124] Also in Salem, Indiana, wind gusts up to 81 miles per hour (130 km/h) were recorded. In Floyds Knobs, Indiana near Louisville, Kentucky, winds were reported in excess of 70 mph. In Indiana, high winds caused more than 200,000 customers to be without power throughout the state. Wind gusts of 63 miles per hour (101 km/h) were recorded at Indianapolis International Airport. Coming to Indianapolis, on September 14, Ike also caused damages to the first-ever motorcycle Grand Prix held in Indianapolis, stopping both 125cc and MotoGP races after the two thirds of the distance, and causing the cancellation of the 250cc race.

Last edited by gy2020; 11-09-2011 at 06:49 AM..
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