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Old 11-09-2011, 08:41 AM
 
Location: San Antonio-Westover Hills
6,878 posts, read 18,167,358 times
Reputation: 5152

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gy2020 View Post
Please don't forget Hurricane Ike. We were lucky that the hurricane was east of us. Ike went north and caused great destruction in several states including Indiana. It was a rare storm but it packed a wollop!

Hurricane Ike - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

On September 14, after Ike became extratropical and was enhanced by an upper level shortwave trough, a major wind event took place across the lower and middle Ohio Valley and lower Great Lakes, and significant rainfall and flooding took place to the west. Several areas in Illinois and Indiana, already flooded by the frontal boundary to the north, saw significant additional rainfall.[120] Due to flooding in Chicago, Todd Stroger declared a state of emergency for Cook County due to flooding of the Des Plaines River. Hurricane-force wind gusts were reported to the east of the center across parts of Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio and Pennsylvania with significant wind damage including structural damage to buildings and trees. The Louisville area declared a state of emergency due to major damage, and the Louisville International Airport was closed temporarily. A LG&E spokesperson said that this was the worst power outage in 30 years.[121] Later in the day, a statewide state of emergency was declared in Kentucky by Governor Steve Beshear.[122] Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky International Airport was also temporarily shut down, and the control tower was evacuated. In Shannon County Missouri, an outdoor music festival was taking place; though a large tree fell causing a power outage and Sinking Creek was high there were no injuries reported. In Cincinnati, numerous reports of roof damage were called in to law enforcement, and on September 15, most of the schools in Hamilton County, Butler County, and Clermont County had classes cancelled because of power outages, some of which lasted seven days. Wind gusts of 75 miles per hour (121 km/h) were recorded at Columbus, which is equivalent to sustained wind levels found in a Category 1 hurricane.[123] Additionally, a state of emergency was declared in Ohio on Monday.[124] Also in Salem, Indiana, wind gusts up to 81 miles per hour (130 km/h) were recorded. In Floyds Knobs, Indiana near Louisville, Kentucky, winds were reported in excess of 70 mph. In Indiana, high winds caused more than 200,000 customers to be without power throughout the state. Wind gusts of 63 miles per hour (101 km/h) were recorded at Indianapolis International Airport. Coming to Indianapolis, on September 14, Ike also caused damages to the first-ever motorcycle Grand Prix held in Indianapolis, stopping both 125cc and MotoGP races after the two thirds of the distance, and causing the cancellation of the 250cc race.

Having grown up in Houston, most hurricanes that hit there tend to go north and east, not west. I lived through Ike. I had a 3 year old and a 6 month old baby and we had no power for a week. We made do. Our friends southeast of us did not fare so well. Galveston especially. I don't think San Antonio has ever seen that kind of destruction...?
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Old 11-09-2011, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Universal City, Texas
3,109 posts, read 8,691,372 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom2Feebs View Post
Having grown up in Houston, most hurricanes that hit there tend to go north and east, not west. I lived through Ike. I had a 3 year old and a 6 month old baby and we had no power for a week. We made do. Our friends southeast of us did not fare so well. Galveston especially. I don't think San Antonio has ever seen that kind of destruction...?
Mom2Feebs: i think I was suggesting that if Ike came in further south than Galveston, we could have been in its path. And for a while, we thought it would.
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Old 11-10-2011, 09:15 AM
 
2,721 posts, read 3,405,594 times
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Default Hurricane Carla,

Reached inland pretty much all the way to San Antonio. So I say ,yes, S.A. could be affected, but not likely. It was truly a really bad storm, I remember looking out a window and seeing a very dark sky and the Chinaberry trees blowing over sideways from the force of the wind. At the coast wind speeds were 150 m.p.h.
South of S.A., Poteet etc. got far worse storm damage, but the storm path did come directly through San Antonio.
It was the worst storm I have ever experienced anywhere. I don't remember power outages but then I was only 9 years old. Carla was the 2nd most powerful hurricane ever to hit Texas.
What I can also remember was the taking and storing of food and water supplies at elementary school along with the practice drills of hiding under desks in case of nuclear attack during what I now know to have been the Bay of Pigs time.
Back then I did not understand why we were doing this. They did not tell us
we might be blown up..
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom2Feebs View Post
Having grown up in Houston, most hurricanes that hit there tend to go north and east, not west. I lived through Ike. I had a 3 year old and a 6 month old baby and we had no power for a week. We made do. Our friends southeast of us did not fare so well. Galveston especially. I don't think San Antonio has ever seen that kind of destruction...?
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Old 11-10-2011, 11:07 AM
 
Location: San Antonio-Westover Hills
6,878 posts, read 18,167,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gy2020 View Post
Mom2Feebs: i think I was suggesting that if Ike came in further south than Galveston, we could have been in its path. And for a while, we thought it would.
My apologies. I didn't read that well enough.
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Old 11-10-2011, 08:01 PM
 
365 posts, read 438,005 times
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Hurricanes are good for San Antonio because they bring us rain. Not much else. Lightning and flooding are the two biggest concerns here.
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Old 11-10-2011, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,619 posts, read 12,900,351 times
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Yeah, occasionally SA gets hammered by a hurricane but the greatest fear is from the tornadoes that comes with it. If your house was built after 2005, the new building codes from that time forward are for hurricane force winds. So the construction techniques are in the house to withstand hurricane force winds. I guess you can thank Katrina for that. We hardly ever see that kind of wind but it does happen.
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Old 11-10-2011, 09:30 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, Texas
4,274 posts, read 6,624,238 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by huckster View Post
Reached inland pretty much all the way to San Antonio. So I say ,yes, S.A. could be affected, but not likely. It was truly a really bad storm, I remember looking out a window and seeing a very dark sky and the Chinaberry trees blowing over sideways from the force of the wind. At the coast wind speeds were 150 m.p.h.
South of S.A., Poteet etc. got far worse storm damage, but the storm path did come directly through San Antonio.
It was the worst storm I have ever experienced anywhere. I don't remember power outages but then I was only 9 years old. Carla was the 2nd most powerful hurricane ever to hit Texas.
What I can also remember was the taking and storing of food and water supplies at elementary school along with the practice drills of hiding under desks in case of nuclear attack during what I now know to have been the Bay of Pigs time.
Back then I did not understand why we were doing this. They did not tell us
we might be blown up..
And did we blow you up?! NO, we didn't! Told you so!!! Bwahahahaha

*maniacal laughter*

I remember Hurricane Emily, though. Didn't she blow through San Antonio directly?
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Old 11-11-2011, 09:44 AM
 
498 posts, read 676,974 times
Reputation: 264
The flood of 1998 in SA was caused by remnants of Hurricane Madeline. Madeline started in the Pacific came across Mexico and dumped torrential rains over south central TX and SA. I received 17 inches of rain on a Saturday and two more on Sunday at my house on October 17 and 18. Wide spread flash flooding occurred over SA's main water sheds SA River, Salado and Leon creeks. The city bought out and demolished some homes in the Salado Creek area around Dreamland, Perrin Beitel and MLK months later. I remember seeing news clips of dead horses from a stable logged way up in the trees near Ira Lee Dr. in the OakWell Farms area on the northeast side near NE Loop 410. Several high water rescues were made and many drowned that weekend in SA. The media had helicopters and live footage from the flooding nonstop on TV, parts of the city I knew well were hard to recognize under so much water.
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Old 11-16-2011, 12:29 AM
 
Location: Texas
4,346 posts, read 5,703,036 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom2Feebs View Post
Having grown up in Houston, most hurricanes that hit there tend to go north and east, not west. I lived through Ike. I had a 3 year old and a 6 month old baby and we had no power for a week. We made do. Our friends southeast of us did not fare so well. Galveston especially. I don't think San Antonio has ever seen that kind of destruction...?
Absolutely correct. We are often effected but damage is generally very minor.
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Old 11-16-2011, 06:54 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
3,542 posts, read 7,522,243 times
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Hurricanes here are incredibly rare, but they are completely possible -- and not just in theory. The center of the famous Indianola Hurricane of 1886 tracked right over Downtown San Antonio as a Category 2 (winds 96-110 mph). Records from back then mention there was significant damage in town from that storm.
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