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Old 09-06-2009, 02:54 PM
 
88 posts, read 270,514 times
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Can I plant this tree myself or do I need to hire someone? I have never digged a hole to plant a tree before. Seems simple, but considering my backyard is mostly sod, is ok to do? How deep should of a whole should I dig, etc?
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Old 09-06-2009, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Universal City, Texas
3,109 posts, read 8,716,415 times
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You can do it yourself. Wait until the fall to plant the tree, dig a hole about 18 inches deep and place some Miracle Grow sod in the hole and plant your tree. Add mulch on the top layer. Water sparingly. I made the mistake of watering to often last year and the tree died back. It came back on its own this year and I only water about once every two weeks or so.
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Old 09-06-2009, 03:22 PM
 
88 posts, read 270,514 times
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Thanks!
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Old 09-06-2009, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Seaford, Delaware
3,471 posts, read 17,272,398 times
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The hole should be twice the size of the bucket the tree comes packed into. So, the rest of the info is correct. It's easy to do. Put mulch around the tree to keep it from drying out too fast between waterings.
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Old 09-06-2009, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Wiesbaden, Germany
13,807 posts, read 26,345,946 times
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You can start with those tiny ones too. Mine couldn't have been two feet tall when I first put them in the ground and I think they cost $3 or something like that. They were the smallest ones in the nursery and at a promotion price. Don't waste money on the big ones because you'll have big ones soon enough. Mine were reaching my second story roof within three years. I can't recommend the crepe myrtle enough for this area.
Make sure they have plenty of sun. You don't need to baby them at all.
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Old 09-06-2009, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Western Bexar County
3,823 posts, read 13,370,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rd2007 View Post
You can start with those tiny ones too. Mine couldn't have been two feet tall when I first put them in the ground and I think they cost $3 or something like that. They were the smallest ones in the nursery and at a promotion price. Don't waste money on the big ones because you'll have big ones soon enough. Mine were reaching my second story roof within three years. I can't recommend the crepe myrtle enough for this area.
Make sure they have plenty of sun. You don't need to baby them at all.
A very resilient tree. I cut all the branches off my crepe myrtle tree in late May and in two weeks there were many new buds coming out. In about 6 weeks the tree was full of leaves and started flowering this summer. Now the tree is as tall as it was before I cut it.
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Old 09-06-2009, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Wiesbaden, Germany
13,807 posts, read 26,345,946 times
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we sure have been agreeing on a lot of things lately..

I never even watered mine this year or anything. It's always a great idea to get a plant/tree that is native or native to a place that is even more vicious than this place. My Mexican Bird of Paradise Pride of Barbados (Plant Answers) are doing better than ever this year. I think them and the crepe myrtle along with roses and plumbago are the only things that actually thrive off disgustingly hot weather.
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Old 09-07-2009, 07:10 AM
 
Location: Kallison Ranch, San Antonio,TX.
1,668 posts, read 3,361,880 times
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Has anyone ever seen a Crepe Myrtle with two different colors of flowers? This one has pink and red flower. My Mom bought it at Rainbow Gardens on Thousand Oaks. It appears to be a dwarf.
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Old 09-07-2009, 12:28 PM
 
Location: in my mind
2,745 posts, read 13,115,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rd2007 View Post
we sure have been agreeing on a lot of things lately..

I never even watered mine this year or anything. It's always a great idea to get a plant/tree that is native or native to a place that is even more vicious than this place. My Mexican Bird of Paradise Pride of Barbados (Plant Answers) are doing better than ever this year. I think them and the crepe myrtle along with roses and plumbago are the only things that actually thrive off disgustingly hot weather.
Don't forget the Esperanza (Yellow Bells). Have you seen some of the huge ones by the highways?? Awesome!! I actually killed mine... well not ME, but there was a water leak under the yard that I didn't know about, until I noticed the Esperanza looking bad, and that lead me to the soggy area of the yard. The excessive moisture killed it. It was a beauty too, and big. Now that I fixed the problem I will have to replace it. I saw a sign out front of a nursery the other day advertising red (or was it orange?) Esperanzas, which I've never seen. Sounds pretty!

I have a question on the Crepemyrtles though. I have two that I planted last year. One is nice and tall, the other not so much because the dogs trampled it more than once. Anyway, they both get "wilty" looking in the hot weather. Should I not water them even though they look like they want water??

Both are nice and green, the bigger has bloomed a little, but they both get that awful "water me" look every few days when it's hot.

Also, what do y'all do with the crepemyrtles that sprout up near or under an existing tree? I have some crepemyrtles that were here long before I bought the house. They are 2 stories high and huge, but next to one, a couple feet away, branches with flowers have sprouted up in bush-form. I debated as to whether or not I should leave them. Can they turn into "trees" too if I prune them right?

Last edited by fierce_flawless; 09-07-2009 at 12:32 PM.. Reason: Something wrong with my PERIOD button, keep having to fix punctuation! Arrgh.
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Old 09-07-2009, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Wiesbaden, Germany
13,807 posts, read 26,345,946 times
Reputation: 3989
oh yeah, definitely cannot forget the Esperanza. I have one in the back yard and it takes care of itself too. It is next to some Texas Sage that is also a great hardy plant.
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