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Old 01-14-2010, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Potranco/1604
358 posts, read 721,391 times
Reputation: 205

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Quattro, sounds like you're already well into the process if you have the mold identified and a remediation plan drawn up. I'd suggest that you forget any "remediation" and just hire a decent contractor, have him make the same repairs, more or less, that he'd make without any mold present and just spray a germicide in the area before closing it back up. Think about it. You've been in that house for however long with the mold present and you don't mention that anyone has gotten seriously ill. This whole thing of containment areas, negative air, enviro suits, respirators, etc is crap. Mold, even the dreaded "black mold", is everywhere and for 99.9% of us it's not a problem. You eat cheese, don't you? LOL!

Seriously, don't buy into the hype. It's the lawyers and the remediation industry who created the hysteria over nothing as a way to make big bucks for themselves. You'll notice now that most insurance companies exclude it in no uncertain terms from their homeowner's policies, the lawyers have moved onto other issues and most of the "remediation" companies have gone out of business. That tells you a lot about the supposed seriousness of it. When the money from the insurance companies went away, suddenly mold was no longer a problem...
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Old 01-14-2010, 05:48 PM
 
4,796 posts, read 13,713,541 times
Reputation: 2709
I suppose I'm the odd gal out here causing they hype and hysteria. I freely admit that our situation was not the norm....but it was serious.

Two things that are not correct and are not "hysteria"....One do not treat mold with a germacide. You need a biocide that kills MOLD. It's similar to chlorine without the toxic fumes. Most contractors know where to get it.

The second point.... go with your gut feelings. You're getting advice from people here that think it's nothing to people like me who have lived through a nightmare. No one here can really give advice since none of us know all the particulars to your situation. Hopefully WillG can give you some good advice. If you still have questions, call and ask any unanswered questions at either of these two places. Someone should be able to point you in the right direction for your specific problem. Best of luck....

Greater San Antonio Builders Association
3625 Paesanos Parkway San Antonio, TX 78231
Phone 210.696.3800 Fax 210.692-3459

Texas Residential Construction Commission
311 E. 14th Street
P.O. Box 13509
Austin, Texas 78711-3509
877-651-TRCC (8722)
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Old 01-14-2010, 07:40 PM
 
4,796 posts, read 13,713,541 times
Reputation: 2709
Quote:
Originally Posted by bg2ntst View Post
Think about it. You've been in that house for however long with the mold present and you don't mention that anyone has gotten seriously ill. This whole thing of containment areas, negative air, enviro suits, respirators, etc is crap. Mold, even the dreaded "black mold", is everywhere and for 99.9% of us it's not a problem. You eat cheese, don't you? LOL!

Seriously, don't buy into the hype.
bh2....just came back to this thread and re-read your comment here. You are correct that some attorneys have hyped some of the dangers due to 60 minutes doing shows where whole houses had to be left behind and destroyed...contents and all. Those stories are actually true, but rare. I agree that Quattro's situation isn't that dire.

You're also correct about mold being in the environment. You could set a petri dish on the curb for 10 minutes and probably grow mold spores. The problem is in the concentration. That's why areas that are exposed to outside air cannot be used for testing....ie garages, enclosed patios etc.

I'm not contesting anything you're saying here....other than saying it's not a problem. Yes...we walk among mold spores daily, but an enclosed, often unseen area that stays damp and warm can grow enough mold to make someone very ill. It doesn't even have to be the lethal black mold. (yes...there are several varieties.) I won't go into the personal experiences my family lived through, but he needs more than a city forum to decide how serious it is. I don't mean to harp on this, but that tiny nail hole inside an exterior wall took four years to grow enough mold over time to finally penetrate the inside of the house. Unfortunately for us, we got sick before we found the mold. The medical bills were outrageous, but the builder did the repairs and mold remediation. Once we move out, everyone regained their health.

He's fortunate enough to apparently have found the mold before it got to the saturation point we lived with. At any rate, it needs to be treated correctly and repaired correctly....without hype or hysteria, nor does it need to be dismissed as something unimportant. The point I was hoping to make and sorely missed, was that it needs to be treated before it becomes severe.
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Old 01-14-2010, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Potranco/1604
358 posts, read 721,391 times
Reputation: 205
Quote:
Originally Posted by wCat View Post
bh2....just came back to this thread and re-read your comment here. You are correct that some attorneys have hyped some of the dangers due to 60 minutes doing shows where whole houses had to be left behind and destroyed...contents and all. Those stories are actually true, but rare. I agree that Quattro's situation isn't that dire.

You're also correct about mold being in the environment. You could set a petri dish on the curb for 10 minutes and probably grow mold spores. The problem is in the concentration. That's why areas that are exposed to outside air cannot be used for testing....ie garages, enclosed patios etc.

I'm not contesting anything you're saying here....other than saying it's not a problem. Yes...we walk among mold spores daily, but an enclosed, often unseen area that stays damp and warm can grow enough mold to make someone very ill. It doesn't even have to be the lethal black mold. (yes...there are several varieties.) I won't go into the personal experiences my family lived through, but he needs more than a city forum to decide how serious it is. I don't mean to harp on this, but that tiny nail hole inside an exterior wall took four years to grow enough mold over time to finally penetrate the inside of the house. Unfortunately for us, we got sick before we found the mold. The medical bills were outrageous, but the builder did the repairs and mold remediation. Once we move out, everyone regained their health.

He's fortunate enough to apparently have found the mold before it got to the saturation point we lived with. At any rate, it needs to be treated correctly and repaired correctly....without hype or hysteria, nor does it need to be dismissed as something unimportant. The point I was hoping to make and sorely missed, was that it needs to be treated before it becomes severe.
While I can't get into the particulars in a public forum, I happen to be very familiar with this subject. Again, there may be some people that might have adverse reactions to mold, but you have to ask yourself...why was it never a huge or well-known "problem" until the personal injury lawyers got hold of it after 60 Minutes did the story on the family in Dripping Springs? Why weren't the lawyers all over it back in the 80's, 70's, 60's , etc? I think we all know why...it wasn't, and isn't, truly a health problem for any but a few of us. It was, and is, a created "problem" by the plaintiff's bar (just like the silicone breast implant hysteria). And now that the insurance money has mostly dried up... Ay-yi-yi, don't get me started. LOL!!

Don't misunderstand me. You and your family may be in the very small percentage of people who really do get sick from mold. And the OP does need to get repairs done correctly. But it can be done much less expensively by avoiding all the "remediation" baloney.
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Old 01-15-2010, 02:26 PM
 
Location: South Texas
810 posts, read 1,246,231 times
Reputation: 466
Based on the assessment of our situation, a contractor/construction company would do just fine for what we need. I think for some jobs that have more mold damage, a remediation company may be the choice.

We worked with a Certified Industrial Hygienist and he did a excellent job in his investigation and testing of the mold. He is a one-man-show company and a lot more affordable than the other bigger players in town. His attention to client service is exceptional and we highly recommend him over other Industrial Hygienists in town. He will be honest with you on “tests” you don’t need regardless of what other companies may tell you and he is a scientist. Cole Technologies - Home.
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Old 01-15-2010, 03:28 PM
 
337 posts, read 741,143 times
Reputation: 157
First of all MOLD is an allergen. Mold is everywhere all the time. It is impossible to not find mold.

The EPA and the State of Texas have mold remediation guidelines that certified mold remediators must follow based on the contiguous amount of mold found.

Educate yourself, don't let someone who is not trained or doesn't really understand what is going on steer you to being afraid of "toxic mold".

I can assure you the mold portion should not cost more that a few thousand dollars. From what you are describing it is contained in a fairly small area and can easily be taken care of. It doesn't matter what type of mold you have, the protocol is the same no matter what type it is.

Good luck!
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Old 01-15-2010, 03:54 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
9 posts, read 15,114 times
Reputation: 17
I'd direct forum readers to: Update: Pulmonary Hemorrhage/Hemosiderosis Among Infants --- Cleveland, Ohio, 1993-1996. Here one will find a very concise explanation by the Centers for Disease Control as to the origin of the myth of the killer, black mold most often referred to as Stachy. Also, Ms. 01 Snake is correct in stating that there are 'guidelines' for cleanup for mold, but these are precisely what they are and nothing more (Especially in the case of EPA and NY State). I would direct forum readers to: Mold Program: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs). Here one may read about the great range of flexibility in the TX rules and regulations.
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Old 01-16-2010, 08:43 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
9 posts, read 15,114 times
Reputation: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by bg2ntst View Post
Quattro, sounds like you're already well into the process if you have the mold identified and a remediation plan drawn up. I'd suggest that you forget any "remediation" and just hire a decent contractor, have him make the same repairs, more or less, that he'd make without any mold present and just spray a germicide in the area before closing it back up. Think about it. You've been in that house for however long with the mold present and you don't mention that anyone has gotten seriously ill. This whole thing of containment areas, negative air, enviro suits, respirators, etc is crap. Mold, even the dreaded "black mold", is everywhere and for 99.9% of us it's not a problem. You eat cheese, don't you? LOL!

Seriously, don't buy into the hype. It's the lawyers and the remediation industry who created the hysteria over nothing as a way to make big bucks for themselves. You'll notice now that most insurance companies exclude it in no uncertain terms from their homeowner's policies, the lawyers have moved onto other issues and most of the "remediation" companies have gone out of business. That tells you a lot about the supposed seriousness of it. When the money from the insurance companies went away, suddenly mold was no longer a problem...
I think the inform decision maker will consider a number of things prior to concluding whether to attempting a self-fix, subcontracting, or hiring a mold remediation company. Some are practical issues such as is the building owner handy enough to effect repairs, are the water leak(s) stoppable, and mold contamination not widespread (>10-25 sq.ft.). Additionally, inhalation exposure to mold spores, hyphae, microbial volatile organic chemicals, and mycotoxins can exacerbate pre-existing respiratory ailments, such as nose and throat irritation, allergies, asthma. There is a recognized link between mold exposure and such deleterious health effects. In the final analysis, individuals will need to find a comfort level with risk, and what they considered cost-benefit return on their project investment.
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Old 01-17-2010, 07:16 PM
 
337 posts, read 741,143 times
Reputation: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by ngiardino View Post
I'd direct forum readers to: Update: Pulmonary Hemorrhage/Hemosiderosis Among Infants --- Cleveland, Ohio, 1993-1996. Here one will find a very concise explanation by the Centers for Disease Control as to the origin of the myth of the killer, black mold most often referred to as Stachy. Also, Ms. 01 Snake is correct in stating that there are 'guidelines' for cleanup for mold, but these are precisely what they are and nothing more (Especially in the case of EPA and NY State). I would direct forum readers to: Mold Program: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs). Here one may read about the great range of flexibility in the TX rules and regulations.
Actually they are state required in Texas and states that do not have state specific rules follow the EPA. These are not suggestions and certified mold remediation companies are required to follow these. Please do not believe these are suggestions.

Good luck getting any contractor do touch mold without following these Guidelines.
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Old 01-19-2010, 10:35 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
9 posts, read 15,114 times
Reputation: 17
The regulations are written so the remediators are minimally trained to exercise minimal standards of care in conducting their work. It is the job of the mold assessment consultant to determine the water damage and mold contamination, as well as write a protocol for the remediator, which directs the manner in which clean up and clearnace will be done. A remediator may indeed be a state licensed company, or a home owner (<25 contiguous sq. ft.), a real estate agent, or for that matter a construction company (See 295.303. EXCEPTIONS AND EXEMPTIONS of the TX Mold Regulations).
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