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Old 01-26-2010, 10:37 AM
 
4,796 posts, read 13,717,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brenty13 View Post
I have a geologist friend who works at Southwest Research Institute. I'll see if I can get a hold of him to find out more info for you.
Thanks! if he can just look at the photo would be awesome!
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Old 01-26-2010, 10:45 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasNick View Post
Read something the other day that blew my mind:

To get an idea of how long the dinosaur era spanned, you can place one T-Rex in Los Angeles in single file all the way to Brooklyn, while compared to human existence, humans only can span the length of Madison Square Garden.

Plenty of fossil fuels.
Nick...I read a little about the Cretaceous period and in the simplest non educated explanation, it began with a huge meteor that hit the gulf around the Yucatan peninsula. That began the end of the dinosaurs, and why Texas and our region is so "oil" wealthy. But it took about 146 million years for the majority of living plants and animals to become extinct. That's a heck of a long time. Anything that survived adapted and evolved to suit the changes in climate. Most of what survived were flying mammals....not sure why.

Obviously it's MUCH more complex than that...but that event was sort of the conception of Texas and much of the South that surrounds the gulf.
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Old 01-26-2010, 10:57 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
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If you are into Geology you may want to check out the Gem and Mineral show that is put on annually here by the Sowthwest Gem and Mineral Society. It's coming up in March. They have a good mix of gems, jewelry and mineral specimins to look at or purchase. The universities have a booth where you can look at different minerals under there microscopes. Here is a link to their show.
Southwest Gem and Mineral Society-Fiesta of Gems
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Old 01-26-2010, 03:23 PM
 
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Default Very Interestin gy2020 ,

I found a mommoth tooth in the bank of Culebra Creek in 1984. It had fallen down to the dry creek bottom and was just laying there. Just inside Loop 1604 , 100 yards west of the overpass on F.M. 471. right before Les Harrison Dr. going towards town. I still have it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gy2020 View Post
Cat, I was a geology major and took courses at SAC and later UT Austin. Math was my downfall. I later took some courses at UTSA long after my Business Degree from UT Austin. San Antonio's southside has seen about 70 shorelines since the Cretaceous, 65,000,000 years ago. That's why all the sand on the southside. The northside of Bexar County (hill country) is Cretaceous, the southside much more recent. There are many dinosaur footprints from Bandera, Blanco and in between. Also around Canyon Lake. Over in Bandera County you can see some Allasaurus prints. The prints near Blanco are sauropods. Most of the prints are in the Glen Rose formation which dates 100,000,000 years. This is the same formation that you see in Glen Rose, Texas, where Dinosaur State Park exists.

Back in this time, the ocean ran from the Gulf to Canada slicing the US in half. During the Cretaceous we were in the ocean. West Texas up to Canada along the Rocky Mountain spine is where you can find dinosaur bones. All we seem to find are footprints. When you do find bones in this are they tend to be of marine variey. Back about 1988 a young boy, and his father, were walking along Slaughter Creek in South Austin and the boy spotted some bones. The father contacted UT Paleo dept and they uncovered a Marine Reptile, similar to Lock Ness monster (a plesiosaur, that is long neck, long tail and four flippers. It appeared it ran into an underwater rock formation that broke its neck.

If you do see large bones, that many interpret as dinosaurs in this region, they are usually mammoths that ranged the area up to about 10,000 years ago.

Back in 1987, a friend and I started the Geology Club of San Antonio. I no longer attend, but I was there untill 1999 when I moved to St. Louis. The current president is Larry Tillick and his email is ltillick@sbcglobal.net. The club meets monthly and has a field trip each month. I'm sure they would like to hear from you and anyone else interested in this hobby.
gy2020
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Old 01-27-2010, 06:23 PM
 
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Gy...I meant to thank you for all the good info. I'm really not wanting to spend a lot of time learning geology at this time....although it's on my bucket list.

I really just want a professional geologist to look at the external fossil image in this rock and see what they think it is.

RE: plesiosaur....a very large one was discovered in DFW when they were excavating the land for the airport back in the 70's. It was assembled and was on display for years in the Braniff terminal (another dinosaur!) Now it's been relocated to some obscure place on the airport where no one can enjoy it.
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Old 01-29-2010, 04:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brenty13 View Post
I have a geologist friend who works at Southwest Research Institute. I'll see if I can get a hold of him to find out more info for you.
Cat, the geologist I had hoped could help has moved on to another job/state. Sorry I couldn't help further.
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Old 01-29-2010, 04:48 PM
 
4,796 posts, read 13,717,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brenty13 View Post
Cat, the geologist I had hoped could help has moved on to another job/state. Sorry I couldn't help further.
No problem....thanks for trying.
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Old 01-29-2010, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Universal City, Texas
3,109 posts, read 8,700,417 times
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cat: Just run over to the geology dept at UTSA. Take your pics with you. I'm sure they would be glad to help. I took about 12 hours there in the late 80's. They are good people. If St. Marys is closer or Trinity Univ. All good depts. They all came to the club and gave talks as did UT Austin.
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