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Old 05-29-2007, 04:38 PM
 
52 posts, read 227,802 times
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I read a post about possible upcoming flooding in SA and a bad flood in 1998. Was all of SA effected? How bad was it (damage)? What area's were hit most? I'm planning a camping/house seeking trip with my family in mid June and don't want to get caught in any storm. Any info?

Thanks,

jjuranko
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Old 05-29-2007, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Western Bexar County
3,823 posts, read 9,976,449 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjuranko View Post
I read a post about possible upcoming flooding in SA and a bad flood in 1998. Was all of SA effected? How bad was it (damage)? What area's were hit most? I'm planning a camping/house seeking trip with my family in mid June and don't want to get caught in any storm. Any info?

Thanks,

jjuranko
If you see Noah's Ark, then all of San Antonio would be affected by a major flood. Otherwise, the low lying areas near creek beds (wet or dry types) or rivers. If you see a dip in a road with a measure marker next to it (5 foot), then it could be prone to flooding during heavy rains. The city/county will put barriers in front of flooded areas. DO NOT attempt to go around them. If stranded by the water, and you have to be rescued, consider yourself lucky that you will just get a ticket ($400 fine) and a rescue fee of $400 per person instead of drowning. Stay away from these areas during big storms and you will be OK.
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Old 05-30-2007, 07:51 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
545 posts, read 1,623,385 times
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If you're coming in June, you should be OK...Monsoon season around here is March/April and October...
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Old 05-30-2007, 09:06 AM
 
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In the 1998 flood the Olmos Basin area off of 281 flooded. 281 was covered in water.

I can't remember for sure, but I don't think that that area was affected as drastically in the flood in 2002. The area primarily affected then was the Medina Dam area because there were structural problems with the dam that caused water to leak through.

The pp is right, though. The high water crossings are always the biggest danger when there are flash floods.
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Old 05-30-2007, 05:53 PM
 
Location: I10 Bexar county line
15 posts, read 71,691 times
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San Antonio is really semi-arid, and wetter as you go east. However, what sets us apart is we are on the edge of the Edwards Plateau. Sudden rains, soaked soil, will rapidly cause flash flooding. It does not help that our streets are utilized to drain the water in rains.

I'd recomend the PBS movie if you can find it. Interesting case studies about the city of New Braunfels.

Some references & readings:

1998 flood
The San Antonio Flood of 1998
Heavy Rains of October 1998 Flood Over South Central Texas - National Weather Service Forecast Office - WFO, Austin/San Antonio, Texas (http://www.srh.noaa.gov/ewx/html/wxevent/2005/Midoct.htm - broken link)

2002 flood
July 2002 Floods - National Weather Service Forecast Office - WFO, Austin/San Antonio, Texas (http://www.srh.noaa.gov/ewx/html/wxevent/2002/jul2002/julfld2002.htm - broken link)

“Texas Flood” PBS Movie This one-hour movie follows the lives of five
Texans who rebuild after the great Central Texas flood of 1998.

Their stories unfold to show how the rapidly growing corridor from Austin to San Antonio is the most flash-flood prone area in all of North America.

Tens of thousands live in harm’s way with no comprehensive program to address the issue.

The community of New Braunfels serves as a case study for several floodplain issues. New Braunfels actually lowered their floodplain (more than ten feet) in the mid-1980s and now has hundreds of homes in harm’s way. All this was done despite a tremendous flood history, explained along with more than a dozen of Texas’ 255 major and catastrophic floods via a great collection of historic flood footage and photographs.

Our character’s choices to rebuild and the larger issues behind such decisions are then highlighted in the dramatic repeat flood of July 2002 that reduced some of the rebuilt homes to concrete slabs.

“Texas Flood” was made as the initial model for a PBS series entitled “The Water’s Edge” which will provide a national critique of the problems of
continuing floodplain developments and the associated costs (personal devastation, tax payer burden, and loss of habitat).

This series will also include a brief history of national flood losses, a critique of building practices and current policies, and a vision for the appropriate use of floodplains with issues like flood-proofing, open space and habitat restoration.

reference: Marshall Frech U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Flood Risk Outreach and the Public’s Need to Know, UNIVERSITIES COUNCIL ON WATER RESOURCES JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY WATER RESEARCH & EDUCATION ISSUE 130, PAGES 61-69, MARCH 2005
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Old 05-30-2007, 06:17 PM
 
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Thanks for this. It's not clear from the pictures whether any personal property was under water. Did Shearer Hills flood? Areas in or near Olmos Park? It looks like some houses probably ended up under water near 281. Which ones?
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Old 05-30-2007, 07:12 PM
 
Location: I10 Bexar county line
15 posts, read 71,691 times
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Wink salado creek ... olmos creek ... leon creek

West Avenue around Walker Ranch park was closed for days.
Heimer Road near the horse stables ( I have not been over there in a long time at Heimer )

Basically anywhere near these main creeks:
Cibolo Creek (north boundary of Bexar County)

Salado Creek (north and central SA)
http://www.sara-tx.org/site/flood_control/flood_retention/flood-water-retention-dams.jpg (broken link)

Leon Creek (north central and west SA)

Olmos Creek was held back by the Olmos dam, otherwise downtown would have flooded. Since Olmos creek is part of the San Antonio River, here's some interesting info on that system.

The San Antonio River (http://64.233.167.104/search?q=cache:Rm2pn8J6l34J:www.edwardsaquifer.net/sariver.html+Olmos+dam+san+antonio&hl=en&ct=clnk&c d=1&gl=us - broken link)
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Old 05-30-2007, 09:44 PM
 
52 posts, read 227,802 times
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Tens of thousands live in harmís way with no comprehensive program to address the issue.

The community of New Braunfels serves as a case study for several floodplain issues. New Braunfels actually lowered their floodplain (more than ten feet) in the mid-1980s and now has hundreds of homes in harmís way. All this was done despite a tremendous flood history, explained along with more than a dozen of Texasí 255 major and catastrophic floods via a great collection of historic flood footage and photographs.

Great info SOTXAG62! Is this why homes in NB seem to be so economical? I really need input because NB is on our list of possible cities to relocate. Visiting this June.

jjuranko
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Old 05-30-2007, 11:40 PM
 
Location: Western Bexar County
3,823 posts, read 9,976,449 times
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A couple of years ago, SAWS used to collect a couple of bucks each month for Storm Water fee. I guess they stopped that as not much was shown for the money. The only place in San Antonio that is well protected is the River Walk that has underground tunnels to divert the excess water.
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Old 05-31-2007, 01:37 PM
 
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Unless you live in a flood plain, you shouldn't have a problem. The flooding that you've probably heard of (and is the subject of the PBS movie referenced above) was really no surprise to most. If you live on a river/creek in Texas (or anywhere for that matter) expect to have to deal with floods on periodic basis. FEMA, along with local agencies prepare flood maps for this very reason. The flood maps in developed areas are pretty well defined and new construction of habitable structures in a floodplain is prohibited. The two floods in 1998 and 2002 were '500-yr' floods. The term 500-yr flood doesn't mean that it only happens every 500 years, it just means on average the chance of having a flood of that magnitude is one ever 500 years. Another (better) way of saying it would be there is a 0.2% chance that large of a flood will happen in any given year. The 100-yr flood would be a 1% chance, and so on.

Several websites have basic flood information: BRWM for Bexar County and Comal County Engineers Office for Comal County (New Braunfels). On Comal County's website you can look at the maps themselves or also use their online GIS mapping to zoom into a specific area. For other areas, you can look at FEMA's official maps at this site: FEMA Map Service Center.
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