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Old 11-28-2017, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Jurupa Valley, CA, USA 92509
1,377 posts, read 1,436,194 times
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So, you want to move to the Coachella Valley, do you? Well then, look no further, because I will go ever each of the nine main cities (aka, the Desert Cities), which are Palm Springs, Desert Hot Springs, Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, La Quinta, Indio, and Coachella, as well as the surrounding census-designated places and rural areas on the outskirts of the east and west halves of the Coachella Valley. The descriptions of each area will primarily be based on my first-hand experience and knowledge. This thread will give a better idea of what the Coachella Valley is like overall and let newcomers determine which areas of the general area are best for one or another to relocate to.

Many newcomers ask about what the general area is like to live, among other things. As stated above, this thread will be used for this very purpose.

Weather

Remember: the Coachella Valley is in the desert of Southern CA, the low desert, to be precise. So, this can only mean one thing, and that is the summers here are brutally baking HOT!!! Summer high temps here often reach 110-117°F on end, and on some days, the temp can even reach above 120°F. There have been days in the past where the record high temps have reached and hovered around 125°F. Summer nights do not cool off as much as the areas up in the high desert (e.g., Yucca Valley, Barstow, Victorville, Lancaster, etc.). For at least five months of the year will the weather remain like this, so please, do consider this in mind when thinking about relocating to any city or town in the Coachella Valley. With that being said, you'll probably, and most likely, will not go outside. If you do plan to go outside, however, it is best recommended that you do so in the early hours of the morning or in the evening when it actually cools off (it doesn't sometimes). This is especially important if you decide to do certain activities, such as walking your dog, hiking, jogging, and so on. Oh, and make sure you drink LOTS and LOTS of water, and also make sure to wear light clothing, and, if you must, wear a wide-brimmed hat. Otherwise, that's what a swimming pool in your backyard is for. After all, "too much sun is no fun!" On the bright side, you will enjoy the winters here in our valley! Here's why: the winters in the Coachella Valley are pretty mild, meaning that you'll actually be able to wear a short-sleeved shirt and shorts if you want to! Just don't wear that at nighttime or in the early morning in the winter, you'll regret it. Winter highs here are generally in the mid-60's, 70's, and/or 80's temperature ranges, while winter lows can commonly drop below 50°F, 40°F, or even 30°F (okay, maybe not that much, but it has happened). I have read on some weather website that the record low in winter in the Coachella Valley is slightly below 20°F, but I could be wrong about that. The winter is also great because that time of year is when the people from much colder places up north (commonly known as"snowbirds") come down here for warmer winters, and this results in increased business, mainly for tourism, but the downside is more traffic. The winters last from mid or late December to about mid-March. Another thing, too: the Coachella Valley can get WINDY! It sometimes doesn't matter what season it is, it just... gets windy pretty much when the weather feels like it. From my experience, it gets the windiest in the area of the Coachella Valley where the wind turbines are placed. Cities and towns that suffer from the most wind are those closest or within the San Gorgonio Pass (aka, Banning Pass), which are Desert Hot Springs, Palm Springs, North Palm Springs, Whitewater, Bonnie Bell, Snow Creek, and Cabazon (some consider it to be in the Inland Empire, others consider it to be in the Coachella Valley, who knows what this town is truly part of).

Economy

The economy here in the Coachella Valley primarily consists of two main things: agriculture and tourism. In fact, pretty much all of the main cities were originally agricultural (the cities of Indio and Coachella are still a bit agricultural today). Were it not for agriculture, our beautiful valley would still remain as a barren wasteland.

Electricity

The Coachella Valley is served by two electric companies: Southern California Edison (SCE) and Imperial Irrigation District (IID). SCE serves the west side of the Coachella Valley (anything west of Washington Street), while IID serves the east side (anything east of Washington Street). From what I heard, SCE tends to suffer from more power outages than IID does and costs a lot more for electricity bills. IID, on the other hand, costs lower and does not suffer from power outages as much. Generally, the cutoff (or dividing line) between SCE and IID is Washington Street.

Education

Education in the Coachella Valley isn't exactly my strong suit of knowledge. I have only attended schools in Indio and one middle school in Desert Hot Springs (I graduated from Indio High School in 2016), so I'm not exactly sure about other schools in the valley. But, I will say this: there are three school districts in the Coachella Valley, and they are the Palm Springs Unified School District, the Desert Sands Unified School District, and the Coachella Valley Unified School District. PSUSD serves Palm Springs, Desert Hot Springs, Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, and Thousand Palms. DSUSD serves Palm Desert, Indian Wells, La Quinta, Bermuda Dunes, and Indio. CVUSD serves Indio, Coachella, Thermal, Mecca, Oasis, and (strangely) Salton City. When relocating to the Coachella Valley, and if you have kids, be prepared to decide between a school district, and if you can afford to live in an area that you desire, then go for it. If not, then you may have to settle for some other school district, or you can get an inter-district transfer. Visit the nearest school district building for more information.

So... anyway, without further ado, let's get right into it!

Cities

Palm Springs - Ah, yes. Let's start with the most obvious and well-known city in the Coachella Valley, Palm Springs. Known for its golf courses, stylish hotels, hot springs, spas, and its many fine examples of mid-century architecture (modernism), Palm Springs is basically the principal city of the Valley. It is also the largest city by area, and is also home to some of the highest concentration of same-sex couples of any community in California and perhaps the nation. This is also where more than half of the events in the Coachella Valley happen, some of which include the Greater Palm Springs Pride Celebration, the White Party, and the Stonewall Equality Concert. Palm Springs is also home to Wet'n'Wild Palm Springs (formerly operated as Knott's Soak City by Cedar Fair Entertainment Company), so a great place to take your kids during the baking HOT summer! It also has one of the three main hospitals in the Coachella Valley, the Desert Regional Medical Center. At one point, it was home to many Hollywood movie stars, and there is a neighborhood in Palm Springs called Movie Star Colony. Sadly though, it's not all "sunshines and rainbows" in this city, if you know what I mean. Palm Springs suffers from a high crime rate, and now has the highest in the Coachella Valley, higher than that of Indio, Coachella, and even Desert Hot Springs. It said to be higher than in 93% of U.S. cities, but I wouldn't worry about it too much. Yes, there is quite a bit of gang activity in Palm Springs (I won't tell you what gangs are exactly out here in the Coachella Valley either, but they are primarily Sureño street gangs), but if you look into the right neighborhoods, you shouldn't have much to worry about. That being said, avoid the eastern and northern portions of Palm Springs, and look into west and south. The northwest portions get EXTREMELY windy (due to being closest to the wind turbines), so if you can, avoid that area.

Desert Hot Springs - Also known by locals as "DHS" or "Spa City," Desert Hot Springs is the only city in the Coachella Valley to be located entirely north of Interstate 10, while the other eight Desert Cities are located mostly south of there and are connected to each other. Incorporated in 1963, Desert Hot Springs is home to "the best mineral water on Earth," and that's where the nickname "Spa City" is derived from. It is also the third smallest city in the Coachella Valley, and sits at the highest elevation of 1,064 feet above sea level. Like Palm Springs, Desert Hot Springs suffers from a pretty high crime rate as well, and at one point or another, it was about two or three times above the national average. Several street gangs started forming in the mid or late 1990's, and now have taken hold of several neighborhoods, such as Browns Town, West Drive (and the streets running off it), and the Upper Compound. There have even been gang injunctions set in Desert Hot Springs from time to time as the population continues to grow, with the most recent one that happened earlier this year. Desert Hot Springs has also received other nicknames derived from its highly negative reputation such as "Desperate Hot Springs" and "Meth Capital of California." LOTS of wind there, too! But, not to worry. There are still good neighborhoods in this small city to choose from, such as the Mission Lakes Country Club. Desert Hot Springs is one of the cheapest areas to buy or rent in the Coachella Valley, and is still affordable by California standards. Just as long as you look into the right areas, I believe you'll do just fine and dandy.

Cathedral City - Known by locals as "Cat City," "The Spirit of the Desert," or "Cats City," Cathedral City is the second largest city in the Coachella Valley by population, and is also the second youngest city. It is home to the Desert Ice Palace, which is an ice-skating rink that first opened in 2011. The amusement park, Boomer's!, is also located in Cathedral City. The one area that I would advise you to avoid is the Palm Springs Dream Home Estates (or also known as simply "Dream Homes"). This is where more than half of gang activity in Cathedral City takes place. There are a couple more areas with this problem, but the Dream Homes area is the most known and common one for this specific activity. If you plan to look into Cathedral City, look into the areas that are closer to neighboring Rancho Mirage. It is the third cheapest city in the Coachella Valley to buy or rent. An upside is that you are literally a stone's throw away from Palm Springs, so there's that!

Rancho Mirage - Rancho Mirage... I'm not sure if I have much of a say on this one, but I'll try. Incorporated in 1973, it is home to the Ritz-Carlton, The River at Rancho Mirage shopping outlet, and the Eisenhower Medical Center, which is another of the three main Coachella Valley hospitals. Rancho Mirage is the second smallest city only behind Indian Wells. Gang activity in Rancho Mirage is definitely non-existent, and it's the safest Coachella Valley city that I have listed so far. In fact, pretty much all of Rancho Mirage is pretty safe and upscale! Generally speaking, however, the nicer and more upscale a city is overall, the more expensive it will be. With that being said, Rancho Mirage is the second most expensive area to buy or rent in the Coachella Valley, and if you actually happen to be wealthy enough, then I'd say go for it.

Palm Desert - Centrally located in the heart of the Coachella Valley, Palm Desert is sometimes known as "The Hub of the Valley." It is home to several points of interest, such as the Westfield Mall Palm Desert, the Desert Springs Marriott, the Vintage, and the El Paseo Shopping District, one of the most upscale shopping areas (and snootiest ) in the Coachella Valley. Palm Desert is also home to the original campus of College of the Desert, which was established in 1958. No, there isn't any gang activity in that city. Palm Desert is the first area that I would recommend for someone looking to relocate to the Coachella Valley because it is still affordable (kind of) by California standards. Plus, in this city, you're centrally located to many activities around you if you're a younger individual, such as parks, fine dining, hiking, and so on.

Indian Wells - Indian Wells is the most expensive (and exclusive) area in the Coachella Valley to buy or rent. The smallest city and incorporated in 1967, Indian Wells mainly consists of gated country clubs, and is home to the Indian Wells Tennis Garden and the Hyatt Regency. Naturally, Indian Wells serves as one giant gated community, and it's the safest city in the Coachella Valley that I have listed. No gang activity in Indian Wells at all. Do not look into Indian Wells unless you're somehow EXTREMELY well off.

La Quinta - Also known as "The Gem of the Desert," La Quinta is the youngest city in the Coachella Valley (incorporated in 1982). It is home to three IB World Schools, Benjamin Franklin Elementary School, Amelia Earhart Elementary School, and La Quinta High School. So, with that being said, if you have kids and plan to look into La Quinta, then this could be an excellent area for you to relocate to and enjoy! However, the only area of La Quinta that I would advise you to take caution of is the La Quinta Cove. Some people have said to have something stolen or have their house broken into, but I could be wrong. I read somewhere that this specific area of La Quinta even suffers from a bit of gang activity, but again, I could be wrong, I'm not quite sure. Crime there mainly consists of theft, break-in, vandalism, and/or car-jackings. Nothing that much major, really. Aside from the Cove, La Quinta is overall a superb city to live in, but it's the third most expensive area in the Coachella Valley to buy or rent. If you're able to buy or rent there, then I think you'll be quite happy!

Indio - Okay, this is the city that I happen to know the most about, and quite well. Also known as the "City of Festivals," "Ciudad de Festivales," or "The Place to Be," Indio truly lives up to its nickname(s). Some annual festivals include, but not limited to, the Riverside County Fair and National Date Festival, the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival (commonly known as "Coachella Fest"), the Stagecoach Country Music Festival, the Desert Trip, and the International Tamale Festival. Indio is the oldest and largest city in the Coachella Valley (it boasts almost 100,000 permanent residents), and primarily consists of blue-collar Hispanics (about 75% of Indio) that are friendly and down-to-earth people. It also still bears its agricultural and railroad roots, and as a result, it's the main freight train hub of the Coachella Valley. Indio is also home to three high schools, which are Indio High School, Shadow Hills High School, and Amistad High School, and John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital, the other of the three main Coachella Valley hospitals. It is also home to the Coachella Valley History Museum, which depicts the early history of Indio and the Coachella Valley. It's worth the look! Oh, and let's not forget about Shield's Date Garden, which has some of THE best tasting date shakes in the Coachella Valley. While it has indeed grown substantially, a growing population means an increase in criminal element, and this city is no different. Indio is home to the largest number of street gangs in the Coachella Valley, and has at least ten (I won't name them here), and gang activity seems to be mainly concentrated in areas south of Interstate 10. Several areas include, but not limited to, the old North Indio (north of the railroad but south of Interstate 10), the apartment complexes across from the Food 4 Less, the eastern areas along Avenue 48, and so on. The poverty is quite a bit high in Indio as well. My advice is if you're planning to look into Indio, check out the new developments that are north of Interstate 10 or areas closest to La Quinta. Indio is my most favorite area in the Coachella Valley due to having so many memories (I was born and raised here) of this city and just the feel of it!

Coachella - Also known as the "Gateway to the Salton Sea" or the "City of Eternal Sunshine," Coachella is the easternmost main city in the Coachella Valley, and has the highest Hispanic population (about 95-98%) due to its roots in the agricultural industry. Incorporated in 1946, Coachella is home to the only Coca-Cola bottling facility in the Coachella Valley, Grapefruit Boulevard, and Spotlight 29 Casino. It is also near the oldest high school in the Coachella Valley, Coachella Valley High School, which was founded in 1910. This city is quite a bit different from the other Desert Cities in that it still has some farming going on in the outer fringes of the city limits. Citrus, dates, carrots, lettuce, and other varieties of produce are what is commonly grown in Coachella and neighboring Indio, and they are perfect locations for growing due to the year-round warm weather (especially winter). Coachella also surprisingly has quite some greenery and quite a bit of trees due to irrigation from agricultural land and the Coachella Canal. However, Coachella also suffers from some gang activity as well. Gang activity is primarily concentrated in and around Avenues 50, 51, 52, and 53, and the Pueblo Viejo District (from First to Seventh Street). There have been quite some gang injunctions from time to time, but the overall crime has lowered down, and back then, the crime in Coachella was pretty high. The poverty is quite a bit high there, too. At one point, Coachella ranked third lowest in average personal income of any city in California, and one of ten poorest cities in the state. If you must look into this city, I'd recommend to start looking into The Vineyards and Bella Cielo gated communities. Coachella is the second cheapest city in the Coachella Valley to buy or rent. Coachella is my second most favorite area of the Coachella Valley due to its uniqueness to the area and I personally wouldn't mind living there if the opportunity presented itself.

Census-designated places/towns

Alright, now that I got all of the nine main cities of the Coachella Valley out of the way, I will now go through the census-designated places/towns. Let's go!

Thermal, Mecca, Vista Santa Rosa, Oasis - The communities of Thermal, Mecca, Vista Santa Rosa, and Oasis are small farming communities located southeast of Indio and Coachella. These areas are some of the poorest and most impoverished areas of the Coachella Valley. Thermal, Mecca, and Oasis seem to have one street gang each, but I'm not sure. There are plenty of trailer parks, some of which are in inadequate condition (sadly enough), and LOTS of produce are grown out that way.

North Shore - North Shore is a community located on the northern Shore of the Salton Sea (hence its name). It is home to the North Shore Yacht Club and a newly-made community center.

Indio Hills, Sky Valley - Indio Hills and Sky Valley are northern Coachella Valley communities that are quite similar to each other. A lot of the residences (house or trailer) up in those areas are very widely spaced out, at least five miles from each other. Indio Hills and Sky Valley are more targeted towards hardcore desert rats and pioneer types. However, they also target a bad element: folks who do meth and vandalism. Due to the areas being sporadically policed, both Indio Hills and Sky Valley seem to be quite the perfect place for these said activities. So, this is just something to consider if you plan to live more "out of the way" in the Coachella Valley.

Bermuda Dunes - Bermuda Dunes is essentially an extended suburb of either La Quinta or Indio. Personally, I'd say it fits more to La Quinta, but that's just me. It's a pretty nice area overall.

Thousand Palms - Thousand Palms is a community primarily consisting of older single-family homes and trailer parks. It is home to several nurseries, and despite having the name "Thousand Palms," there are actually not 1,000 palm trees there. Thousand Palms does have a little bitty-bit gang activity (one or two gangs there), but I wouldn't worry too much.

Desert Edge, Desert Palms, Garnet - There isn't really much to say about Desert Edge, Desert Palms, and Garnet. They're just a few spots on the map, each of which just have scatterings of houses, and are hardly worth a look and/or mention.

North Palm Springs - It is a small town just several miles southwest of Desert Hot Springs. North Palm Springs is home to The Windmill Shop, which serves some of the best date shakes in the Coachella Valley. It is also home to Jalisco Tires and the Desert Resource Center, which was a homeless shelter for the west side of the Coachella Valley, that has unfortunately been permanently shut down since June of this year. It is VERY windy there, too, and kind of run-down, so just keep that in mind.

Whitewater - Whitewater is a run-down community that consists of a scattering of houses and a rock quarry. Oh, and lots of windmills, too. It's also VERY windy. There is also a hiking trail, the Pacific Crest Trail, which leads all the way up to Canada, and the Whitewater River.

Bonnie Bell - The only thing I can say for sure about Bonnie Bell is that it has just a few residences, some of which are shaded by tamarisk trees. The only road going in and out of Bonnie Bell is a rural road, and that is Whitewater Cutoff Road. It also gets VERY windy there. That's about it.

Snow Creek - Snow Creek is a secluded enclave just several miles northwest of Palm Springs. It is completely surrounded by open land, and consists of less than 40 dwellings, some of which are odd adobes that were created by certain artists. Snow Creek is where the desert and the coastal currents literally meet, and as such, is VERY windy, with a wide array of flora. Basically, a peaceful, full-of-art village. Not even many people in nearby Palm Springs have ever heard of this little, unique locale. It's pretty difficult to describe, actually. You just have to go check out Snow Creek for your own self.

Cabazon - Last, but certainly not least, there is lovely Cabazon. This small town is mainly known for the roadside Cabazon Dinosaurs and the shopping outlets (Cabazon Outlets and Desert Hills Premium Outlets). It's also VERY windy there, too. Some locals say that Cabazon is part of the Inland Empire, while others say that it is part of the Coachella Valley. But, I'll just put this one in there anyway just because...

Okay, that about covers every single one of the communities in the Coachella Valley!

Now, a few notes of advice:

1. Get a feel for the area until you are sure that the area is where you would like to live. It is best to rent first in an area that you're interested in living. At least six months would probably help.

2. Do not complain about the weather too much if you can help it. I know, I know... we all know that the heat sucks a lot of the time, but believe it or not, you actually become acclimated to it overtime. This takes time, too, but that's okay.

3. Always take precaution wherever you are, even in the good areas. Lock your car doors, try to avoid the bad areas/neighborhoods, and always, ALWAYS stay aware of your surroundings.

4. Don't expect to come up with a job quickly (if you don't have a job already). Remember, this is a tourist area (well, mainly in the west side of the Coachella Valley), so most jobs here are mainly seasonal.

So, I believe that about covers it all! If any of you have any further questions about the Coachella Valley, don't be afraid to ask. I'll try to do my own best to answer any questions that any of you might have.

Thank you all for taking the time to read!

Last edited by Brandon Graves; 11-28-2017 at 07:26 PM..
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Old 11-29-2017, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Jurupa Valley, CA, USA 92509
1,377 posts, read 1,436,194 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Graves View Post
So, you want to move to the Coachella Valley, do you? Well then, look no further, because I will go ever each of the nine main cities (aka, the Desert Cities), which are Palm Springs, Desert Hot Springs, Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, La Quinta, Indio, and Coachella, as well as the surrounding census-designated places and rural areas on the outskirts of the east and west halves of the Coachella Valley. The descriptions of each area will primarily be based on my first-hand experience and knowledge. This thread will give a better idea of what the Coachella Valley is like overall and let newcomers determine which areas of the general area are best for one or another to relocate to.

Many newcomers ask about what the general area is like to live, among other things. As stated above, this thread will be used for this very purpose.

Weather

Remember: the Coachella Valley is in the desert of Southern CA, the low desert, to be precise. So, this can only mean one thing, and that is the summers here are brutally baking HOT!!! Summer high temps here often reach 110-117°F on end, and on some days, the temp can even reach above 120°F. There have been days in the past where the record high temps have reached and hovered around 125°F. Summer nights do not cool off as much as the areas up in the high desert (e.g., Yucca Valley, Barstow, Victorville, Lancaster, etc.). For at least five months of the year will the weather remain like this, so please, do consider this in mind when thinking about relocating to any city or town in the Coachella Valley. With that being said, you'll probably, and most likely, will not go outside. If you do plan to go outside, however, it is best recommended that you do so in the early hours of the morning or in the evening when it actually cools off (it doesn't sometimes). This is especially important if you decide to do certain activities, such as walking your dog, hiking, jogging, and so on. Oh, and make sure you drink LOTS and LOTS of water, and also make sure to wear light clothing, and, if you must, wear a wide-brimmed hat. Otherwise, that's what a swimming pool in your backyard is for. After all, "too much sun is no fun!" On the bright side, you will enjoy the winters here in our valley! Here's why: the winters in the Coachella Valley are pretty mild, meaning that you'll actually be able to wear a short-sleeved shirt and shorts if you want to! Just don't wear that at nighttime or in the early morning in the winter, you'll regret it. Winter highs here are generally in the mid-60's, 70's, and/or 80's temperature ranges, while winter lows can commonly drop below 50°F, 40°F, or even 30°F (okay, maybe not that much, but it has happened). I think the communities of Coachella, Thermal, and Vista Santa Rosa all become the coldest in the winter. I'm not exactly sure as to why that is because they are all below sea level, but a bit interesting, nonetheless. I have read on some weather website that the record low in winter in the Coachella Valley is slightly below 20°F, but I could be wrong about that. The winter is also great because that time of year is when the people from much colder places up north (commonly known as"snowbirds") come down here for warmer winters, and this results in increased business, mainly for tourism, but the downside is more traffic. The winters last from mid or late December to about mid-March. Another thing, too: the Coachella Valley can get WINDY! It sometimes doesn't matter what season it is, it just... gets windy pretty much when the weather feels like it. From my experience, it gets the windiest in the area of the Coachella Valley where the wind turbines are placed. Cities and towns that suffer from the most wind are those closest or within the San Gorgonio Pass (aka, Banning Pass), which are Desert Hot Springs, Palm Springs, North Palm Springs, Whitewater, Bonnie Bell, Snow Creek, and Cabazon (some consider it to be in the Inland Empire, others consider it to be in the Coachella Valley, who knows what this town is truly part of).

General Feel

The Coachella Valley has seen a ton of substantial growth and development over the past several decades, and as such, is its own metro area (and is a lot smaller and unique one at that), and it's still growing. However, this area is primarily suburban (but it still has a bit of an urban feel), so there are not many tall buildings. The most obvious and well-known city, Palm Springs, probably has the most urban feel to the area. The total population of the Coachella Valley is approximately 450,000 year-round residents with an increase of about 25-30% seasonally to 600,000 residents during the popular winter and spring months when the area is home to visitors and "snowbirds" — part-time seasonal residents who own or rent second homes in the Coachella Valley. This metro area in California is pretty unique due to being located east of the mountain ranges (San Bernardino mountains and San Jacinto mountains) that separate itself from other metro areas further west (the LA Area, Orange County, the San Diego Metro, the Inland Empire), having a different climate (hot (low) desert climate), and having more of a resort feel to it. In fact, the Coachella Valley, as a whole, is also sometimes referred to as the "Greater Palm Springs Area," the "Palm Springs Metro," the "Desert Empire," the "Valle de Coachella," the "Desert Cities," or simply, "the Desert," to further differentiate itself from other Southern CA metros. The cities of Palm Springs, Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, La Quinta, Indio, and Coachella all sit mostly south of Interstate 10 and connect to each other, while Desert Hot Springs sits entirely north of it. All nine of the Desert Cities have a primarily suburban feel to it, while the other areas west, north, and southeast of them have a more rural and laid-back feel.

Demographics

The Coachella Valley as a whole is mainly consisted of a high Hispanic population (about 65-75%), especially in the east side of the valley (Indio, Coachella, and areas southeast of there), with non-Hispanic whites being the second largest race group here, and includes other races such as African-Americans, Asians, Pacific Islanders, etc.. As you may or may not have guessed, the Coachella Valley is primarily a resort/retirement area (mainly west of Indio), so this means LOTS of retirees that have settled down.

Activities/Entertainment/Nightlife

The Coachella Valley provides a wide array of activities for one to be determined to do. Some activities here include, but not limited to, golfing (if you're a lot older), hiking, parks, cycling, fine dining, and so on. Entertainment in the Coachella Valley is somewhat limited, and so is nightlife, and one of the main ways for entertainment is going to a casino (Agua Caliente, Fantasy Springs, Spotlight 29, Augustine, Morongo). For other forms of entertainment or activities, one would have to drive to the nearest major cities (San Bernardino, Fontana, Rancho Cucamonga, Ontario, Riverside, Moreno Valley, Corona, Temecula), and of course, LA, Orange County, and San Diego are just a couple of hours and some minutes away.

Crime/Safety

As with every other area in the nation, you can find and/or experience crime. The Coachella Valley is certainly no different. Some years, it was higher. Other years, it was lower. You'll also find nice, safe, and upscale neighborhoods, and poor, run-down, and higher crime neighborhoods in pretty much anywhere in the nation (and the world). Again, the Coachella Valley is certainly not an exception to this, as well. For the safest areas in the Coachella Valley, you can check out Indian Wells, Palm Desert, and Rancho Mirage. It is possible to find good and safe areas in cities with more crime. Desert Hot Springs, Palm Springs, and Indio are examples of this. Yes, crime in the Coachella Valley can be bad, depending on where you are, but I wouldn't say as much as say, certain parts of the LA Area or certain parts of the Inland Empire. Yes, there are also street gangs in the Coachella Valley, but again, not nearly as much as you would find in say the LA Area or the Inland Empire. From my experience living here for almost all of my life, I would say that the cities of Indio, Coachella, and Desert Hot Springs probably experience the most gang activity in the Coachella Valley. It's not as prevalent as it was in the past, but it's still there. It's not Compton, but they are around. Other areas of the Coachella Valley (aside from the three I mentioned) that experience gang activity (albeit on a far smaller scale) are Palm Springs, Cathedral City, La Quinta (oddly enough), Thousand Palms, Thermal, Mecca, and Oasis. Other areas of the Coachella Valley, such as Palm Desert, Rancho Mirage, and Indian Wells experience no gang activity whatsoever. So, just be sure to look into the right neighborhoods of whichever you desire to live in, and go from there. And, remember, ALWAYS be aware of your surroundings, and don't leave anything unlocked.

Economy

The economy here in the Coachella Valley primarily consists of two main things: agriculture and tourism. In fact, pretty much all of the main cities were originally agricultural (the cities of Indio and Coachella are still a bit agricultural today). Were it not for agriculture, our beautiful valley would still remain as a barren wasteland.

Electricity

The Coachella Valley is served by two electric companies: Southern California Edison (SCE) and Imperial Irrigation District (IID). SCE serves the west side of the Coachella Valley (anything west of Washington Street), while IID serves the east side (anything east of Washington Street). From what I heard, SCE tends to suffer from more power outages than IID does and costs a lot more for electricity bills. IID, on the other hand, costs lower and does not suffer from power outages as much. Generally, the cutoff (or dividing line) between SCE and IID is Washington Street.

Education

Education in the Coachella Valley isn't exactly my strong suit of knowledge. I have only attended schools in Indio and one middle school in Desert Hot Springs (I graduated from Indio High School in 2016), so I'm not exactly sure about other schools in the valley. But, I will say this: there are three school districts in the Coachella Valley, and they are the Palm Springs Unified School District, the Desert Sands Unified School District, and the Coachella Valley Unified School District. PSUSD serves Palm Springs, Desert Hot Springs, Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, and Thousand Palms. DSUSD serves Palm Desert, Indian Wells, La Quinta, Bermuda Dunes, and Indio. CVUSD serves Indio, Coachella, Thermal, Mecca, Oasis, and (strangely) Salton City. When relocating to the Coachella Valley, and if you have kids, be prepared to decide between a school district, and if you can afford to live in an area that you desire, then go for it. If not, then you may have to settle for some other school district, or you can get an inter-district transfer. Visit the nearest school district building for more information.

So... anyway, without further ado, let's get right into it!

Cities

Palm Springs - Ah, yes. Let's start with the most obvious and well-known city in the Coachella Valley, Palm Springs. Known for its golf courses, stylish hotels, hot springs, spas, and its many fine examples of mid-century architecture (modernism), Palm Springs is basically the principal city of the Valley. It is also the largest city by area, and is also home to some of the highest concentration of same-sex couples of any community in California and perhaps the nation. This is also where more than half of the events in the Coachella Valley happen, some of which include the Greater Palm Springs Pride Celebration, the White Party, and the Stonewall Equality Concert. Palm Springs is also home to Wet'n'Wild Palm Springs (formerly operated as Knott's Soak City by Cedar Fair Entertainment Company), so a great place to take your kids during the baking HOT summer! It also has one of the three main hospitals in the Coachella Valley, the Desert Regional Medical Center. At one point, it was home to many Hollywood movie stars, and there is a neighborhood in Palm Springs called Movie Star Colony. Sadly though, it's not all "sunshines and rainbows" in this city, if you know what I mean. Palm Springs suffers from a high crime rate, and now has the highest in the Coachella Valley, higher than that of Indio, Coachella, and even Desert Hot Springs. It said to be higher than in 93% of U.S. cities, but I wouldn't worry about it too much. Yes, there is quite a bit of gang activity in Palm Springs (I won't tell you what gangs are exactly out here in the Coachella Valley either, but they are primarily Sureño street gangs), but if you look into the right neighborhoods, you shouldn't have much to worry about. That being said, avoid the eastern and northern portions of Palm Springs, and look into west and south. The northwest portions get EXTREMELY windy (due to being closest to the wind turbines), so if you can, avoid that area.

Desert Hot Springs - Also known by locals as "DHS" or "Spa City," Desert Hot Springs is the only city in the Coachella Valley to be located entirely north of Interstate 10, while the other eight Desert Cities are located mostly south of there and are connected to each other. Incorporated in 1963, Desert Hot Springs is home to "the best mineral water on Earth," and that's where the nickname "Spa City" is derived from. It is also the third smallest city in the Coachella Valley, and sits at the highest elevation of 1,064 feet above sea level. Like Palm Springs, Desert Hot Springs suffers from a pretty high crime rate as well, and at one point or another, it was about two or three times above the national average. Several street gangs started forming in the mid or late 1990's, and now have taken hold of several neighborhoods, such as Browns Town, West Drive (and the streets running off it), and the Upper Compound. There have even been gang injunctions set in Desert Hot Springs from time to time as the population continues to grow, with the most recent one that happened earlier this year. Desert Hot Springs has also received other nicknames derived from its highly negative reputation such as "Desperate Hot Springs" and "Meth Capital of California." LOTS of wind there, too! But, not to worry. There are still good neighborhoods in this small city to choose from, such as the Mission Lakes Country Club. Desert Hot Springs is one of the cheapest areas to buy or rent in the Coachella Valley, and is still affordable by California standards. Just as long as you look into the right areas, I believe you'll do just fine and dandy.

Cathedral City - Known by locals as "Cat City," "The Spirit of the Desert," or "Cats City," Cathedral City is the second largest city in the Coachella Valley by population, and is also the second youngest city. It is home to the Desert Ice Palace, which is an ice-skating rink that first opened in 2011. The amusement park, Boomer's!, is also located in Cathedral City. The one area that I would advise you to avoid is the Palm Springs Dream Home Estates (or also known as simply "Dream Homes"). This is where more than half of gang activity in Cathedral City takes place. There are a couple more areas with this problem, but the Dream Homes area is the most known and common one for this specific activity. If you plan to look into Cathedral City, look into the areas that are closer to neighboring Rancho Mirage. It is the third cheapest city in the Coachella Valley to buy or rent. An upside is that you are literally a stone's throw away from Palm Springs, so there's that!

Rancho Mirage - Rancho Mirage... I'm not sure if I have much of a say on this one, but I'll try. Incorporated in 1973, it is home to the Ritz-Carlton, The River at Rancho Mirage shopping outlet, and the Eisenhower Medical Center, which is another of the three main Coachella Valley hospitals. Rancho Mirage is the second smallest city only behind Indian Wells. Gang activity in Rancho Mirage is definitely non-existent, and it's the safest Coachella Valley city that I have listed so far. In fact, pretty much all of Rancho Mirage is pretty safe and upscale! Generally speaking, however, the nicer and more upscale a city is overall, the more expensive it will be. With that being said, Rancho Mirage is the second most expensive area to buy or rent in the Coachella Valley, and if you actually happen to be wealthy enough, then I'd say go for it.

Palm Desert - Centrally located in the heart of the Coachella Valley, Palm Desert is sometimes known as "The Hub of the Valley." It is home to several points of interest, such as the Westfield Mall Palm Desert, the Desert Springs Marriott, the Vintage, and the El Paseo Shopping District, one of the most upscale shopping areas (and snootiest ) in the Coachella Valley. Palm Desert is also home to the original campus of College of the Desert, which was established in 1958. No, there isn't any gang activity in that city. Palm Desert is the first area that I would recommend for someone looking to relocate to the Coachella Valley because it is still affordable (kind of) by California standards. Plus, in this city, you're centrally located to many activities around you if you're a younger individual, such as parks, fine dining, hiking, and so on.

Indian Wells - Indian Wells is the most expensive (and exclusive) area in the Coachella Valley to buy or rent. The smallest city and incorporated in 1967, Indian Wells mainly consists of gated country clubs, and is home to the Indian Wells Tennis Garden and the Hyatt Regency. Naturally, Indian Wells serves as one giant gated community, and it's the safest city in the Coachella Valley that I have listed. No gang activity in Indian Wells at all. Do not look into Indian Wells unless you're somehow EXTREMELY well off.

La Quinta - Also known as "The Gem of the Desert," La Quinta is the youngest city in the Coachella Valley (incorporated in 1982). It is home to three IB World Schools, Benjamin Franklin Elementary School, Amelia Earhart Elementary School, and La Quinta High School. So, with that being said, if you have kids and plan to look into La Quinta, then this could be an excellent area for you to relocate to and enjoy! However, the only area of La Quinta that I would advise you to take caution of is the La Quinta Cove. Some people have said to have something stolen or have their house broken into, but I could be wrong. I read somewhere that this specific area of La Quinta even suffers from a bit of gang activity, but again, I could be wrong, I'm not quite sure. Crime there mainly consists of theft, break-in, vandalism, and/or car-jackings. Nothing that much major, really. Aside from the Cove, La Quinta is overall a superb city to live in, but it's the third most expensive area in the Coachella Valley to buy or rent. If you're able to buy or rent there, then I think you'll be quite happy!

Indio - Okay, this is the city that I happen to know the most about, and quite well. Also known as the "City of Festivals," "Ciudad de Festivales," or "The Place to Be," Indio truly lives up to its nickname(s). Some annual festivals include, but not limited to, the Riverside County Fair and National Date Festival, the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival (commonly known as "Coachella Fest"), the Stagecoach Country Music Festival, the Desert Trip, and the International Tamale Festival. Indio is the oldest and largest city in the Coachella Valley (it boasts almost 100,000 permanent residents), and primarily consists of blue-collar Hispanics (about 75% of Indio) that are friendly and down-to-earth people. It also still bears its agricultural and railroad roots, and as a result, it's the main freight train hub of the Coachella Valley. Indio is also home to three high schools, which are Indio High School, Shadow Hills High School, and Amistad High School, and John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital, the other of the three main Coachella Valley hospitals. It is also home to the Coachella Valley History Museum, which depicts the early history of Indio and the Coachella Valley. It's worth the look! Oh, and let's not forget about Shield's Date Garden, which has some of THE best tasting date shakes in the Coachella Valley. While it has indeed grown substantially, a growing population means an increase in criminal element, and this city is no different. Indio is home to the largest number of street gangs in the Coachella Valley, and has at least ten (I won't name them here), and gang activity seems to be mainly concentrated in areas south of Interstate 10. Several areas include, but not limited to, the old North Indio (north of the railroad but south of Interstate 10), the apartment complexes across from the Food 4 Less, the eastern areas along Avenue 48, and so on. The poverty is quite a bit high in Indio as well. My advice is if you're planning to look into Indio, check out the new developments that are north of Interstate 10 or areas closest to La Quinta. Indio is my most favorite area in the Coachella Valley due to having so many memories (I was born and raised here) of this city and just the feel of it!

Coachella - Also known as the "Gateway to the Salton Sea" or the "City of Eternal Sunshine," Coachella is the easternmost main city in the Coachella Valley, and has the highest Hispanic population (about 95-98%) due to its roots in the agricultural industry. Incorporated in 1946, Coachella is home to the only Coca-Cola bottling facility in the Coachella Valley, Grapefruit Boulevard, and Spotlight 29 Casino. It is also near the oldest high school in the Coachella Valley, Coachella Valley High School, which was founded in 1910. This city is quite a bit different from the other Desert Cities in that it still has some farming going on in the outer fringes of the city limits. Citrus, dates, carrots, lettuce, and other varieties of produce are what is commonly grown in Coachella and neighboring Indio, and they are perfect locations for growing due to the year-round warm weather (especially winter). Coachella also surprisingly has quite some greenery and quite a bit of trees due to irrigation from agricultural land and the Coachella Canal. However, Coachella also suffers from some gang activity as well. Gang activity is primarily concentrated in and around Avenues 50, 51, 52, and 53, and the Pueblo Viejo District (from First to Seventh Street). There have been quite some gang injunctions from time to time, but the overall crime has lowered down, and back then, the crime in Coachella was pretty high. The poverty is quite a bit high there, too. At one point, Coachella ranked third lowest in average personal income of any city in California, and one of ten poorest cities in the state. If you must look into this city, I'd recommend to start looking into The Vineyards and Bella Cielo gated communities. Coachella is the second cheapest city in the Coachella Valley to buy or rent. Coachella is my second most favorite area of the Coachella Valley due to its uniqueness to the area and I personally wouldn't mind living there if the opportunity presented itself.

Census-designated places/towns

Alright, now that I got all of the nine main cities of the Coachella Valley out of the way, I will now go through the census-designated places/towns. Let's go!

Thermal, Mecca, Vista Santa Rosa, Oasis - The communities of Thermal, Mecca, Vista Santa Rosa, and Oasis are small farming communities located southeast of Indio and Coachella. These areas are some of the poorest and most impoverished areas of the Coachella Valley. Thermal, Mecca, and Oasis seem to have one street gang each, but I'm not sure. There are plenty of trailer parks, some of which are in inadequate condition (sadly enough), and LOTS of produce are grown out that way.

North Shore - North Shore is a community located on the northern Shore of the Salton Sea (hence its name). It is home to the North Shore Yacht Club and a newly-made community center.

Indio Hills, Sky Valley - Indio Hills and Sky Valley are northern Coachella Valley communities that are quite similar to each other. A lot of the residences (house or trailer) up in those areas are very widely spaced out, at least five miles from each other. Indio Hills and Sky Valley are more targeted towards hardcore desert rats and pioneer types. However, they also target a bad element: folks who do meth and vandalism. Due to the areas being sporadically policed, both Indio Hills and Sky Valley seem to be quite the perfect place for these said activities. So, this is just something to consider if you plan to live more "out of the way" in the Coachella Valley.

Bermuda Dunes - Bermuda Dunes is essentially an extended suburb of either La Quinta or Indio. Personally, I'd say it fits more to La Quinta, but that's just me. It's a pretty nice area overall.

Thousand Palms - Thousand Palms is a community primarily consisting of older single-family homes and trailer parks. It is home to several nurseries, and despite having the name "Thousand Palms," there are actually not 1,000 palm trees there. Thousand Palms does have a little bitty-bit gang activity (one or two gangs there), but I wouldn't worry too much.

Desert Edge, Desert Palms, Garnet - There isn't really much to say about Desert Edge, Desert Palms, and Garnet. They're just a few spots on the map, each of which just have scatterings of houses, and are hardly worth a look and/or mention.

North Palm Springs - It is a small town just several miles southwest of Desert Hot Springs. North Palm Springs is home to The Windmill Shop, which serves some of the best date shakes in the Coachella Valley. It is also home to Jalisco Tires and the Desert Resource Center, which was a homeless shelter for the west side of the Coachella Valley, that has unfortunately been permanently shut down since June of this year. It is VERY windy there, too, and kind of run-down, so just keep that in mind.

Whitewater - Whitewater is a run-down community that consists of a scattering of houses and a rock quarry. Oh, and lots of windmills, too. It's also VERY windy. There is also a hiking trail, the Pacific Crest Trail, which leads all the way up to Canada, and the Whitewater River.

Bonnie Bell - The only thing I can say for sure about Bonnie Bell is that it has just a few residences, some of which are shaded by tamarisk trees. The only road going in and out of Bonnie Bell is a rural road, and that is Whitewater Cutoff Road. It also gets VERY windy there. That's about it.

Snow Creek - Snow Creek is a secluded enclave just several miles northwest of Palm Springs. It is completely surrounded by open land, and consists of less than 40 dwellings, some of which are odd adobes that were created by certain artists. Snow Creek is where the desert and the coastal currents literally meet, and as such, is VERY windy, with a wide array of flora. Basically, a peaceful, full-of-art village. Not even many people in nearby Palm Springs have ever heard of this little, unique locale. It's pretty difficult to describe, actually. You just have to go check out Snow Creek for your own self.

Cabazon - Last, but certainly not least, there is lovely Cabazon. This small town is mainly known for the roadside Cabazon Dinosaurs and the shopping outlets (Cabazon Outlets and Desert Hills Premium Outlets). It's also VERY windy there, too. Some locals say that Cabazon is part of the Inland Empire, while others say that it is part of the Coachella Valley. But, I'll just put this one in there anyway just because...

Okay, that about covers every single one of the communities in the Coachella Valley!

Now, a few notes of advice:

1. Get a feel for the area until you are sure that the area is where you would like to live. It is best to rent first in an area that you're interested in living. At least six months would probably help.

2. Do not complain about the weather too much if you can help it. I know, I know... we all know that the heat sucks a lot of the time, but believe it or not, you actually become acclimated to it overtime. This takes time, too, but that's okay.

3. Always take precaution wherever you are, even in the good areas. Lock your car doors, try to avoid the bad areas/neighborhoods, and always, ALWAYS stay aware of your surroundings.

4. Don't expect to come up with a job quickly (if you don't have a job already). Remember, this is a tourist area (well, mainly in the west side of the Coachella Valley), so most jobs here are mainly seasonal.

So, I believe that about covers it all! If any of you have any further questions about the Coachella Valley, don't be afraid to ask. I'll try to do my own best to answer any questions that any of you might have.

I love the Coachella Valley, it will always be home for me! I hope that you may love it here too once you're settled!

Thank you all for taking the time to read!
This message has been updated. Please, read this one instead. Once again, thank you all for taking the time to read!

Last edited by Brandon Graves; 11-29-2017 at 02:46 PM..
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Old 12-04-2017, 09:01 PM
 
71 posts, read 82,592 times
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Originally Posted by Brandon Graves View Post
This message has been updated. Please, read this one instead. Once again, thank you all for taking the time to read!
You have high jacked this entire sub forum and turned it into useless drabble. Congratulations!
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Old 12-05-2017, 12:13 AM
 
Location: TOVCCA
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Brandon, good job. Maybe you could become the next Huell Howser.
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Old 12-05-2017, 01:13 PM
 
7,879 posts, read 3,892,345 times
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You have high jacked this entire sub forum and turned it into useless drabble. Congratulations!
Lighten up, Francis.
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Old 12-05-2017, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Jurupa Valley, CA, USA 92509
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Originally Posted by AFtrEFkt View Post
Lighten up, Francis.
Right?
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Old 12-05-2017, 06:27 PM
 
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Originally Posted by AFtrEFkt View Post
Lighten up, Francis.
You're Brandon! One of many...
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Old 12-06-2017, 12:34 AM
 
5,162 posts, read 3,387,422 times
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You're Brandon! One of many...
Cool your jets. There was a lot of research in that post...it wasn’t exactly a one- or two-sentence troll, now, was it?
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Old 12-06-2017, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Riverside County / Maricopa County
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Originally Posted by EdRoth View Post
You have high jacked this entire sub forum and turned it into useless drabble. Congratulations!
This Brandon post is actually kind of useful, it's much better than the 'arguing with himself using a different screen name' debacle.
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Old 12-06-2017, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Jurupa Valley, CA, USA 92509
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Originally Posted by TBCasino View Post
This Brandon post is actually kind of useful, it's much better than the 'arguing with himself using a different screen name' debacle.
Let's not bring this up anymore, okay? It's now a thing of the past.
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