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Old 01-18-2011, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Verona, WI
1,094 posts, read 1,657,201 times
Reputation: 630

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The primary thing I don't like about San Diego is that I don't live there...yet.
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Old 01-18-2011, 09:47 AM
 
1,963 posts, read 3,905,133 times
Reputation: 1416
Theoloham, the thread was about what you didn`t like about SD and I answered. There is no need for your attitude,DUDE! Keep it to yourself....
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Old 01-18-2011, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Lemon Grove, CA, 91945
4,558 posts, read 7,738,634 times
Reputation: 1749
The weather in 2010....barely no summer and just blah. Very un-San Diego like.

2010 is over and 2011 weather has been killer so far!
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Old 01-18-2011, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Palm Springs, CA
25,759 posts, read 21,828,180 times
Reputation: 6991
Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Damon View Post
Also up right up there with egregious planning decisions was Balboa Naval Hospital in friggin' Balboa Park. Yeah, the original small schoolhouse-like building was there but why the f*ck put a huge hospital complex in the middle of the park?
Not to mention - running a freeway (163) through the middle of a park. That would never happen today. We're much more environmentally conscious than we used to be.

When I look around the inner city neighborhoods of San Diego, I see one planning disaster after another. I get the impression that there were virtually no rules or restrictions on what developers could from about 1940-1980.
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Old 01-18-2011, 12:54 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
15,705 posts, read 18,859,095 times
Reputation: 7943
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnUnidentifiedMale View Post
Not to mention - running a freeway (163) through the middle of a park. That would never happen today. We're much more environmentally conscious than we used to be.

When I look around the inner city neighborhoods of San Diego, I see one planning disaster after another. I get the impression that there were virtually no rules or restrictions on what developers could from about 1940-1980.
Remember 52 goes right through a park (Mission Trails) as well.
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Old 01-18-2011, 01:41 PM
 
227 posts, read 378,580 times
Reputation: 83
As a native of San Diego, I can answer honestly

Unemployment
High cost of living(with any california city)
Earthquakes
Wildfires
Superficial people
California Government


With that said there are still alot of pros about San Diego
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Old 01-18-2011, 01:44 PM
 
4,814 posts, read 7,867,206 times
Reputation: 2716
Socialist politics taking over the state.(not a San Diego thing though, more like Bay Area/SF)

As a native myself, I hate the wildfires and earthquakes too but they happen a lot less than tornados and hurricanes so I try not to complain.

The pros outweight the negatives in my opinion.
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Old 01-18-2011, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Tijuana Exurbs
3,550 posts, read 9,226,980 times
Reputation: 3381
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnUnidentifiedMale View Post
When I look around the inner city neighborhoods of San Diego, I see one planning disaster after another. I get the impression that there were virtually no rules or restrictions on what developers could from about 1940-1980.
In a sense, you are correct. It will take an expert to get the dates right on this, but essentially California was built without land use zoning. What developers did was create zoning through deed covenants. A developer would buy up a large piece of property, subdivide it, and attach covenants to the property such that only single family residences could be built there. Smart buyers knew they wanted covenants because they didn't want a dry cleaners or machine shop built next to their home (see Barrio Logan). The covenants also stated that the house that was built had to cost at least X,xxx amount of dollars to keep out the riff-raff. Often times there were race and religious exclusions as well.

However, not knowing what the future would hold, covenants about the types and uses of buildings would run for 25 or 50 years. In areas where the covenants ran only 25 years, (1929 + 25 = 1954 or 1940 + 25 = 1965), there was a Free-For-All period where anything could be built (see Ray Huffman in the post above) and was. I'm not exactly sure when San Diego City or County implemented government based zoning but it was probably some time in the late 1950s to mid 1960s.

By the time government zoning was implemented enough Huffman style apartments had been built in many of our core urban neighborhoods, that government assumed:

A) who would want to live in these old small houses anyway, they are trash, and everybody wants a new house. If you ever watch HGTV that's all any of their first time homebuyers are interested in, so there is a lot of that mentality still around.

B) these neighborhoods have already been substantially changed, there's nothing that we can do, and besides these areas are old and not worth saving (see A above).

C) these houses are mostly occupied by renters. Our concern is for the landlords not the renters.

Areas where the deed covenants ran 50 years (1929 + 50 = 1979), were still under protection of their covenants when government zoning was implemented. They were still intact owner-occupied, single family neighborhoods, and zoning was implemented to keep them that way.

Areas where the deed covenants lasted only 25 years, were substantially altered by the time the zoning came into force. Landlords of houses didn't want to see the value of their rental properties diminished by losing the right to Huffmanize them, and in the late 50s and early 60s their concerns held sway so that Huffmanization continued into the 1970s, with a variant of the Huffman persisting into the 1980s (the variant had more landscaping in front and a pitched roof).

It took time for neighborhood opposition to galvanize. It required the development of a core of concerned owner-occupied residents who purchased their homes precisely BECAUSE they were old and the streets were people-oriented rather than auto-oriented to finally begin to change the rules. It's likely that in the earlier period, Huffmanization didn't generate a lot of opposition from homeowners in these areas because the owners themselves were people who thought newer was better and were just looking to move out once they had enough money to live in Clairemont. It's the difference in attitude of people who live in an urban areas by choice rather than by financial circumstance.
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Old 01-18-2011, 05:47 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
14,133 posts, read 21,364,277 times
Reputation: 7675
How do people hate earthquakes in SD? They aren't even that big here and never cause damage, and never have. You don't really have to worry about major quakes in SD compared to LA and SF. I actually kind of liked the mild quakes we would get here.

My list of things I did not like about SD:
-crappy roads
-low quality public services and crappy city govt
-high cost of living/salaries that don't match the high COL
-limited job opportunities
-bad planning as others have already mentioned. Too suburban in some parts.

There are prob more but they're minor and too subjective to bother listing. The pros outweigh the cons overall imo.
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Old 01-18-2011, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Sandy Eggo - Kensington
4,472 posts, read 9,542,840 times
Reputation: 2204
Yup, the 70's were a bad time for San Diego's inner ring neighborhoods

My dream would be to replace all of the six-packs with rowhomes a la Baltimore or St. Louis style..... At least some dingbats make you go, "that's kinda cool", but I'll never say that about the Huffmans.

Residential Infill, 70's-Style | Planetizen
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