U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > San Diego
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-20-2011, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Barrio Logan/Shelltown
8,790 posts, read 12,341,593 times
Reputation: 4741

Advertisements

And there are also 100's of applicants for each teaching position, and most of them are local.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-20-2011, 01:04 PM
 
Location: San Diego/Lake Murray
554 posts, read 761,883 times
Reputation: 401
My wife's good, but she's not so good to beat out 100 applicants every time. Maybe the competition is tough, but there are possibilities out there, especially, once again, at the charter and private schools. The OP is already coming out here with her husband (this isn't the case of some 22-year-old college graduate from Wisconsin who has no safety net and no experience) so I'm just saying, yes, there are some openings somewhere on the net that my wife found . . . and you'll probably see a few more in the next couple of weeks (I'm sure my wife's last school will be one of them!).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2011, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Santaluz - San Diego, CA
4,301 posts, read 4,197,058 times
Reputation: 1746
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExpatYelli View Post
Thanks earlyretirement. However, most of the threads have to do with brand new teachers, teaching in other subject areas (that are hard to find jobs in other parts of the country) and specifically San Diego.

Maybe the suburbs are hiring? Specifically the northern or inland suburbs? Poway?

I have experience, grants and am told I am teaching in a high need area (chem, bio etc...) Do those things not apply in the SD area? My husband is a scientist but that isn't the most lucrative position.

Thanks in advance.
You're welcome. But actually there are several posts from experienced teachers that have had problems finding a job here. As well, I personally know several people that were in a similar situation as you and just couldn't find a full-time teaching job. (albeit they weren't in science so maybe you'll have an easier time?).

There are so many teachers already here that have been working that are getting laid off so there are a large pool of teachers to draw from. When a position does open up, I'd imagine there are hundreds of applications.

Definitely I'm not saying that you won't find a job but I think it's wise to at least go into your move being aware of what the job market is like for your field. And definitely as Clevelandgal mentioned, it's VERY wise to budget on only your husband's salary for now.

No one is trying to sound "dire". I just believe it's wise to really go into moving to San Diego with a realistic pulse of how the local market is. Too many people go into the move way too optimistic and they are severely disappointed. So better to set expectations lower and be pleasantly surprised.

Best of luck to you and keep us posted how things go.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2011, 04:19 PM
 
5 posts, read 8,435 times
Reputation: 11
Thank you very much everyone. I really appreciate it. I have been one of those annoying people who have been checking the job searches every other week/day or so. I was certainly surprised to find that no districts were even posting positions but it seems as if those (even if those are only a few!) will come in time as districts in my area start posting jobs rather early in Spring.

I already talked to one school district today about a job and it seemed promising.

As far as credentialing goes, my state has supposed reciprocity but California red tape seems even more bureaucratic than anything I have seen before (and I lived in Germany!). Do I really need to take every test on the books to prove I can teach...again?

I will try to keep all updated. Again, thank you for your help.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2011, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Barrio Logan/Shelltown
8,790 posts, read 12,341,593 times
Reputation: 4741
Talking to a school district about a job and getting one are two different things entirely. If you want to teach in California, you'll have to jump through the hoops that they want you too. You might try subbing, but not all school districts are hiring subs anymore, because they have enough substitute teachers already.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2011, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Ocean Beach, San Diego
1,470 posts, read 1,693,348 times
Reputation: 549
actually districts ...if they are hiring new staff.....and if they don't have to hire back layed off teachers... love brand new teachers, very malleable and entergetic. Once upon a time, before my husband got a Ph.D and went into higher ed, he was a public school teacher and administrator who hired teachers, so I have heard his war stories. I can't speak for the people hoping to relocate, but I feel pretty sure these folks coming from the midwest or east coast are making good money in public schools and are not going to be thrilled to work for a fly by night charter with no retirement and horrible benifits for 29,000 a year.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2011, 08:50 PM
 
513 posts, read 734,951 times
Reputation: 371
you might want to check with San Marcos Unified School District because the district has been expanding rapidly since the late 1990s (average of ~500 new students/year- grew by 600 last year). This means that they are usually looking for teachers as opposed to laying off. For instance, San Marcos High just hired 2 or 3 science teachers last year alone. The school had about 2000 students last year, 2200 this year, but is expected to reach 3,000+ in a few years. Mission Hills High is also expected to grow to around 3,000. The same goes for San Elijo Middle school, which will grow tremendously in the next few years. A commute from La Jolla wouldn't be too fun, but at least you would have a job and you are driving against the flow of rush hour traffic... Plus you could always live in Del Mar, Solana Beach, or Encinitas and neither commute would be bad...

Oh and the good thing about teaching high school in San Marcos is that one of the high schools (Mission Hills) is only 5 years old, while San Marcos high is being completely rebuilt over the next two years- meaning nice teaching facilities and modern equipment. Plus San Marcos offers a more competitive salary once you move up in seniority and they typically do not have to lay off teachers because the district is growing. Jobs are less secure in school districts such as Vista, San Diego, or Grossmont because enrollment is declining. In California, this really means a lot with our budget uncertainties.

oh and on that edjoin website, there are about 7 job postings for SMUSD teachers. None of them are high school science teachers unfortunately (one math thought), but the point is, you should keep checking because the district annually adds more people to its payroll to accommodate the growing number of students or replace retiring teachers. Graduating classes have close to 1300 students, while the youngest classes are closer to 1700...

Last edited by rhanifin; 06-20-2011 at 09:05 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2011, 10:31 PM
 
Location: San Diego/Lake Murray
554 posts, read 761,883 times
Reputation: 401
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clevelandgal View Post
actually districts ...if they are hiring new staff.....and if they don't have to hire back layed off teachers... love brand new teachers, very malleable and entergetic. Once upon a time, before my husband got a Ph.D and went into higher ed, he was a public school teacher and administrator who hired teachers, so I have heard his war stories. I can't speak for the people hoping to relocate, but I feel pretty sure these folks coming from the midwest or east coast are making good money in public schools and are not going to be thrilled to work for a fly by night charter with no retirement and horrible benifits for 29,000 a year.
My wife is getting over 50,000 a year at a charter school. It has pay increases each year with service. She chose the charter school over the public school because of pay and benefits. There is no tenure but with all the public school budget cuts, there isn't as much security in the public schools anymore either.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2011, 11:04 PM
 
Location: Ocean Beach, San Diego
1,470 posts, read 1,693,348 times
Reputation: 549
well I stand happily corrected. In other cities I have lived charters did not pay as much as other schools. I would think an outsider would have much better luck finding one of these positions because the system is not as instutionalized (for better or worse) as the school districts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2011, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Ocean Beach, San Diego
1,470 posts, read 1,693,348 times
Reputation: 549
here is a teaching job for all teachers looking for work. Sure to be challenging, but rewarding too
Your Selection Results... (http://www.npworks.org/job_seeker/job_detail.asp?category=Programs&job_id=6991 - broken link)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > San Diego

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top