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Unread 04-06-2012, 01:16 PM
 
39 posts, read 50,477 times
Reputation: 23
this thread is very informative. thank you all for sharing your "inside".
I throw in a few of my "observations":
1) Most Job Req out there are "crazy". I mean it requires potential candidates to know (or expert) in different area.
2) In tough time, ppl that still have job are just hunker down
3) Some employers are looking for the next Steve Wozniak
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Unread 04-06-2012, 01:22 PM
 
1,371 posts, read 557,492 times
Reputation: 1384
Quote:
Originally Posted by shmoov_groovzsd View Post
Huck, salary is not the issue for me and what I am looking for. Its actual talent here. I can find talent in other parts of the country, thats not the problem, I would just rather employ a San Diegan.

An app developer for 120k is completely out of touch with reality, even for a good one. Granted if they are providing a service post launch then that is a different story.
Perhaps, if it were you, instead who would consider relocating to a more "high tech" area such as San Jose, or Boston, you would have better luck. This is what happens when weather becomes a higher priority, than location.
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Unread 04-06-2012, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Lemon Grove, CA, 91945
4,276 posts, read 3,619,426 times
Reputation: 1438
Quote:
Originally Posted by photo4fun View Post
this thread is very informative. thank you all for sharing your "inside".
I throw in a few of my "observations":
1) Most Job Req out there are "crazy". I mean it requires potential candidates to know (or expert) in different area.
2) In tough time, ppl that still have job are just hunker down
3) Some employers are looking for the next Steve Wozniak

Well the reasons I helped start a company was because there is a need for a particular service in the industry. When that happens, it is difficult sometimes to find a prerequisite for experience except a combination of various skills or talents.

In business you are either pioneering or status quo. Nothing wrong with either one because they are both needed to fulfill a desired result.

Steve Wozniak is Steve Wozniak. Anyone 'looking for' the next Woz is living a pipe dream. It doesnt mean someone that isnt in tech doesnt have a clever idea for something.
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Unread 04-06-2012, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Lemon Grove, CA, 91945
4,276 posts, read 3,619,426 times
Reputation: 1438
Quote:
Originally Posted by 9162 View Post
Perhaps, if it were you, instead who would consider relocating to a more "high tech" area such as San Jose, or Boston, you would have better luck. This is what happens when weather becomes a higher priority, than location.
Thanks 9162, I made the mention in my OP re having to go out in the past to Seattle and the bay area to get hire some folks.

The whole premise of this thread is about local talent in SD and some of challenges I have met. Its not impossible to find the talent here, its just been an interesting exercise compared to several years ago. For the people that are in positions to hire, I was curious about some of their successes and or challenges.
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Unread 04-06-2012, 02:12 PM
 
Location: San Diego
17 posts, read 22,076 times
Reputation: 31
Wow, this is an interesting thread for me.

I am a senior level software developer (mostly database-centric Microsoft Enterprise Intranet systems) working in Phoenix, and am seriously contemplating a move to SD. I am a native Californian and totally understand the sunshine tax, the cost of living, and the resistance to hiring non-locals. I am willing to move to SD without a permanent job and am prepared to support myself financially for an extended period of time (6 months+). The tone of the conversation here leads me to believe that I may be worrying more about finding employment than I need to?
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Unread 04-06-2012, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Lemon Grove, CA, 91945
4,276 posts, read 3,619,426 times
Reputation: 1438
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottKag View Post
Wow, this is an interesting thread for me.

I am a senior level software developer (mostly database-centric Microsoft Enterprise Intranet systems) working in Phoenix, and am seriously contemplating a move to SD. I am a native Californian and totally understand the sunshine tax, the cost of living, and the resistance to hiring non-locals. I am willing to move to SD without a permanent job and am prepared to support myself financially for an extended period of time (6 months+). The tone of the conversation here leads me to believe that I may be worrying more about finding employment than I need to?
Hi ScottKag,

I really dont know much about your end, even though they are inherently related at some level in the tech eco system.

The conversation may have snowballed sideways a little tad.

The intention of my post was intended to be pretty straight forward and geared more towards people that in hiring positions and the challenges, if they are having any, here in San Diego.

If you are SWDev then you are probably aware of all the different sides to software between QA, certification, validation, design etc.
My position was that for what I hire or am looking for, the senior guys are great, I am just saturated and the needs of my clients both from a paygrade and skill level are in a gap that seems somewhat on the thinner side. I am not sure if this has to do with timing when IT and tech started booming, but there is a huge disparity between the 15 yr veterans, the 5 year guys and the post graduate newbies. Some for more obvious reasons but others not so much.
In my world, if you are not providing something more than a what can be done offshore, its a dead end. So some degree of ingenuity and creativity are very helpful in that sense.

I will let some of the other posters chime in on what its like for your sector.
Good luck
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Unread 04-06-2012, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Australia
4,008 posts, read 2,026,630 times
Reputation: 6501
Quote:
Originally Posted by shmoov_groovzsd View Post
Thanks 9162, I made the mention in my OP re having to go out in the past to Seattle and the bay area to get hire some folks.

The whole premise of this thread is about local talent in SD and some of challenges I have met. Its not impossible to find the talent here, its just been an interesting exercise compared to several years ago. For the people that are in positions to hire, I was curious about some of their successes and or challenges.

I like how specialised businesses think they just get to sit around and pick and choose from an endless pool of good candidates just dying to work for THEM.

You have said several times that new graduates in your field are just not up to scratch - how about your company actually contribute a solution to this problem by taking on apprentices/new graduates and helping TRAIN them? Most are not stupid, are desperate to work, and with a small amount of guidance can probably quickly do more basic tasks, leaving your experienced staff to focus where they are needed, and share their knowlege while they are at it. Involving yourself in mentoring the young and inexperienced is NOT a new idea, it has worked for centuries...you may also experience a similarly archaic bonus in the workplace as a result - LOYALTY.

Remember, in the workplace - if you're not part of the solution, you are part of the problem.
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Unread 04-06-2012, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Rolando, San Diego CA 92115
7,049 posts, read 16,816,054 times
Reputation: 2798
Quote:
Originally Posted by 9162 View Post
Perhaps, if it were you, instead who would consider relocating to a more "high tech" area such as San Jose, or Boston, you would have better luck. This is what happens when weather becomes a higher priority, than location.
This is the truth. San Diego is not as attractive a destination as it may seem for many reasons.
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Unread 04-06-2012, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Rolando, San Diego CA 92115
7,049 posts, read 16,816,054 times
Reputation: 2798
Quote:
Originally Posted by MsAnnThrope View Post
You have said several times that new graduates in your field are just not up to scratch - how about your company actually contribute a solution to this problem by taking on apprentices/new graduates and helping TRAIN them?
While this in and of itself is a great idea and a good thing to do, this is not an appropriate solution to hiring for experienced experts in the field.
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Unread 04-06-2012, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Lemon Grove, CA, 91945
4,276 posts, read 3,619,426 times
Reputation: 1438
Quote:
Originally Posted by MsAnnThrope View Post
I like how specialised businesses think they just get to sit around and pick and choose from an endless pool of good candidates just dying to work for THEM.

You have said several times that new graduates in your field are just not up to scratch - how about your company actually contribute a solution to this problem by taking on apprentices/new graduates and helping TRAIN them? Most are not stupid, are desperate to work, and with a small amount of guidance can probably quickly do more basic tasks, leaving your experienced staff to focus where they are needed, and share their knowlege while they are at it. Involving yourself in mentoring the young and inexperienced is NOT a new idea, it has worked for centuries...you may also experience a similarly archaic bonus in the workplace as a result - LOYALTY.

Remember, in the workplace - if you're not part of the solution, you are part of the problem.
Jeez, talk about this thread going sideways...

We do have an apprenticeship and internship program. That is not the issue.

I have mentored and continue to mentor them even when their programs are finished.

If you read any of my other posts, I have a 0 turnover rate and am more than fair. These guys can easily can start their own companies or move onto other companies, but they really enjoy working on their teams because they feel they contribute to the overall success. As far as I know that's about as loyal as it gets. Plus I like giving them paid time off when workload is slow.
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