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Old 06-07-2012, 03:00 AM
 
Location: San Diego A.K.A "D.A.Y.G.O City"
998 posts, read 1,564,034 times
Reputation: 738
Default SD still a Republican stronghold?

Ok maybe it's because of where I live, but I voted for (D) Rudy Reye's for County Board of Supervisors. He went up against the forever long lasting hack (R) Diane Jacobs. I also voted against Duncan Hunter, but his name is a staple in Alpine/El Cajon area's so he will always get re-elected like his father did numerous times over the years.

I was shocked seeing that she got 77% of the vote in this part of East County. Now I know East County has diversified somewhat over the past 10 years, not just ethnically, but by age wise as well. So I was really surprised by how much of a lead Jacobs had over Reyes. I thought maybe the slow changes in Demographics would of helped, but I guess in certain ways nothing has changed.

Will East County ever change to become more progressive in another 10-20 years once all the older Repubs die off? I specifically speak of East County because it feels the most socially conservative part of the County which has to do with the type of people that live here, from Iraqi refugees, to Hispanics, Blacks, and mostly rednecks and or conservative Angelo Christian groups.

I know I am generalizing, but this is what I see everyday in my neighborhood. A lot of people here just have stern conservative look to them.

Now the differences between East County, and North Inland County couldn't be so different from each other. The North has all the wealth, so in my belief, the Republicans up there are fiscally conservative, and possibly more socially moderate than down here.

They are pretty much 2 different types of Repubs in SD, the wealthy (Northern SD, North County), and the middle to lower middle class Angelo Americans (East County) which the local Military has a lot to do with it being this way.

Now because the city has done the redistricting process, I believe one newer districts will now favor another Republican candidate. So simply, all the neighborhoods and it's districts north of the Interstate 8 will be all Repub, and all the ones south of I8 will be Dem.

Overall I kinda feel like SD is going backwards since the Prop A and B passed by wide margins, and all the people that were running for the County BOS are all Republicans, none are Democrats.

As much as we all love to talk about how we all live in harmony and like to be equally thought of as being one USA, that couldn't be further from the truth.

Politicians are the worst people that like to separate us by race, gender, age and income levels. We as citizens don't usually think this way, but sometimes you do have to look at the stats to see what your chances are, but politicians and campaign managers take it to a whole other level, and that is what I hate the most about politics.


So what does everyone think? Will SD County ever change to become more liberal in the future, or more progressive? SD city slightly leans Dem, but that statistic doesn't mean jack crap if these people arent voting.
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Old 06-07-2012, 07:28 AM
 
1,335 posts, read 973,756 times
Reputation: 1038
I agree with you. I voted against Duncan Hunter in 2010 and this year. I really don't like the guy. He hasn't really done anything. The only reason he was elected was because of his daddy. I have a love/hate relationship with East County. It is to me the worst part of San Diego County but the big reason for that is because of how Conservative it is (and how bland and boring. though La Mesa and Lemon Grove are the best and nicest parts)There are still racists and other ignorant people in East County. East County has the sort of people you would find in Texas and Oklahoma. The older people who vote Republican have had kids and they passed their beliefs down to their kids so I don't see it changing anytime soon. I was once talking to a young 20 something women in East County and she brought up Prop 8 and said she thought gays were gross and she voted yes. I said that gays are very nice people and that if I could have voted in 2008, I would have voted no. This angered her and I was then called a derogatory gay name for supporting gay rights. A lot of ignorant people still live in East County. These are the types that watch Foxnews all the time. I've seen it myself.

On another note, Ive never thought of La Mesa or Lemon Grove as East County. Those two cities just feel different from the rest of East County (i.e. Lakeside, Alpine)
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Old 06-07-2012, 08:25 AM
 
Location: San Diego
17,249 posts, read 13,385,245 times
Reputation: 6081
This go round wasn't really partisan imo. It had everything to do with potholes, ballooning pension payments and talks about stupid stadiums when libraries are shut down.
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Old 06-07-2012, 09:15 AM
 
1,335 posts, read 973,756 times
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The problem is this - non-union workers are giving up more and more of what they have had, with wages stagnant and benefits falling because their employers put them up against people who are desperate and starving in third world nations. (by going over seas) Unions pool the collective strength of the workers, and have been able to better resist the erosion of what they have earned.

The question is, why should union workers give up benefits they have had, just so CEOs can get bigger and bigger bonuses?

Don't the workers, with their labor, contribute to and create profits for the companies they work for?

Instead of blaming the unions for having benefits that everyone has had and should have, shouldn't you be asking why employers should be allowed to constantly cut benefits for workers?

You should be arguing for MORE unions, not union workers having less. But hey, do the dirty work for greedy corporations in their race to the bottom for worker pay and benefits.
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Old 06-07-2012, 10:27 AM
 
Location: San Diego
17,249 posts, read 13,385,245 times
Reputation: 6081
There is a huge difference between public and private unions. If I don't want to buy a product that is being sold by a union shop I don't have to, and I rarely do. I can't opt out of fire protection even if I have a fire truck in my driveway.

If you have skills you don't need a union as your skill set sets the wages and benefits based on demand. I'll NEVER need a union to ensure I make a decent wage.
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Old 06-07-2012, 10:29 AM
 
Location: San Diego A.K.A "D.A.Y.G.O City"
998 posts, read 1,564,034 times
Reputation: 738
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradleyyo View Post
The problem is this - non-union workers are giving up more and more of what they have had, with wages stagnant and benefits falling because their employers put them up against people who are desperate and starving in third world nations. (by going over seas) Unions pool the collective strength of the workers, and have been able to better resist the erosion of what they have earned.

The question is, why should union workers give up benefits they have had, just so CEOs can get bigger and bigger bonuses?

Don't the workers, with their labor, contribute to and create profits for the companies they work for?

Instead of blaming the unions for having benefits that everyone has had and should have, shouldn't you be asking why employers should be allowed to constantly cut benefits for workers?

You should be arguing for MORE unions, not union workers having less. But hey, do the dirty work for greedy corporations in their race to the bottom for worker pay and benefits.

I always question corporations that constantly want to cut employee's wages and benefits even when these specific companies are raking in billions of dollars in profits.

It comes to a point where we need to ask corporations are you really cutting your workers wages because your company is in serious red ink? Or are you doing it to strictly satisfy your shareholders since they are barking at you to do whatever it takes to keep there own greedy pockets full?

Greed vs Doing what is morally right, and the greed part always wins.


Yes I agree that La Mesa is more part of SD and not in East County since it's borders SD and feels different from El Cajon, Santee, and Lakeside. La Mesa feels more open minded and progressive than El Cajon for sure.

You still have your hardcore right wingers and their families that will forever stay in East County, there's just something about this place that keeps them here. It might be all the dirt and dead tree's! lol
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Old 06-07-2012, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Lemon Grove, CA, 91945
4,536 posts, read 4,526,802 times
Reputation: 1617
Just heard this about San Diego CEOs since this is relevant to some of the disdain I am reading here regarding CEOs and jobs going overseas and how it is even relevant locally.

Typical CEO Salary In San Diego Is $256K | KPBS.org

I agree and disagree with some of this discussion politically. As far as the OP is concerned I am not certain what it is that Diane Jacobs did or didnt do as County Supervisor to warrant being a 'hack' at what she does. I know her personally and the work she does for her district is nothing but positive. This isnt to say that Rudy Reyes wouldnt have been a very good Supervisor as well. The actual district is certainly a challenge because it probably has the least amount of General Law Cities and is mostly unincorporated a the way deep into East County.
I mean think about it. ANYONE I know that grew up in East County that is now in there 20s and 30s moved out. Guess who still lives there? Mom, pop and even grandparents.
Its no different than the wave of elderly that left the North Park areas etc or even Pt Loma near the base. When I was house hunting near Morley Field and surrounding areas over the past decade I cant tell you how many elderly well selling at peak and moving to places like AZ. Why not? They were making killer cash. But to look at those houses on the inside or outside, they were complete dumps. So flippers or Craftsman restoration companies came in and made a killing (hence some of the gentrification that has happened there). Yet at the same time, right next door was a low income apartment complex or the like.
Same happened with Kensington. It wasnt always sunshine and roses as it is now. The people there really made it shine, but it wasnt that way for a while.

The age gap is going to change in East County over the next 20 years. Like Bradeyyo was saying, the fact that he even would consider Lemon Grove or La Mesa as 'not really' East County really illustrates those changes and I totally agree. The city lines dont necessarily represent the geographical position and its distance to ocean or 'inland' areas.
LG for example has gone rural/country bumpkinish to a city/suburb. LG used to have some of the best schools in the county from what I have heard from locals, but over time it has changed and is at the trough of the wave. New waves or immigrants and young families are moving into these areas and will probably create an incredibly diverse ethnically and socially in the future.
On my street alone, there are some really old people, gays, young professionals, business owners and white trash (insert East County stereotype) lol.

Last edited by shmoov_groovzsd; 06-07-2012 at 11:20 AM..
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Old 06-07-2012, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Rolando, San Diego CA 92115
7,127 posts, read 18,099,341 times
Reputation: 2900
San Diego is a mostly conservative place, but more libertarian leaning - social conservatives would not do well here. However I do think support for public sector unions has eroded to the point where an old-school democrat will have a hard time winning much beyond the typical straight-ticket voters.

Guess who votes more: conservative retiree homeowners or retirees or hip punk rock foodies?

It all comes down to socioeconomics. If your version of San Diego primarily revolves around white collar, upper middle class professional homeowners, retirees and families, you will find it to be a fairly conservative place. If you live in the world of funky offbeat neighborhoods and alternative lifestyles then you are in a much smaller, but much more liberal pool of voters. Population size may indicate the city to be left-leaning, but the voters that actually show up are much more conservative.
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Old 06-07-2012, 11:35 AM
 
Location: West Coast Wanderer
12,396 posts, read 10,377,534 times
Reputation: 5953
City of San Diego has more registered democrats these days but they're a more conservative type. So SD itself is already turning blue in a purely political party affiliation sense. Ideologically it still is conservative. The city is now no longer a GOP stronghold. The county will probably be so for the foreseeable future however. Even many young people in the county are conservative.
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Old 06-07-2012, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Sandy Eggo - Kensington
3,658 posts, read 6,700,864 times
Reputation: 1608
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
City of San Diego has more registered democrats these days but they're a more conservative type. So SD itself is already turning blue in a purely political party affiliation sense. Ideologically it still is conservative. The city is now no longer a GOP stronghold. The county will probably be so for the foreseeable future however. Even many young people in the county are conservative.
It's not just the city of SD that has more registered Democrats, it now applies to the entire County. SD County is no longer blue, it's more purple these days.

Register Now If You Want To Vote | KPBS.org

And as Sassberto mentioned above, socially, it's not conservative here.
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