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Old 01-10-2014, 11:31 AM
 
2 posts, read 7,673 times
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Hello all,

Before I start, I want to clarify that this is not another "please tell me which neighborhoods are bad" threads.

I am someone who is currently considering a move to San Diego. With that said, my question is simple. What is a "bad neighborhood" by San Diego standards? How do you define a "bad" neighborhood in San Diego? I know this might seem like a silly question, but I really believe that lots of people think they live in "bad" neighborhoods when they really don't. Basically, I'm trying to ascertain whether these are truly bad locations, or if they are just perceived that way by people who live in nearby communities.

Thanks.
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Old 01-10-2014, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Barrio Logan/Shelltown
8,844 posts, read 12,557,840 times
Reputation: 4769
There's already a thread on this. Try searching for it.
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Old 01-10-2014, 11:40 AM
 
2 posts, read 7,673 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by moved View Post
There's already a thread on this. Try searching for it.
I have literally gone through the most recent 8 pages on this forum already, and did not see one.

Are you going to answer my question or not?
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Old 01-10-2014, 11:47 AM
 
Location: La Mirada
1,170 posts, read 1,518,014 times
Reputation: 621
Some would say Logan Heights is THE bad neighborhood in San Diego, with Encanto or Paradise Valley following a close second (generally SE San Diego), but I am speaking as a sometime visitor to the area (it was ok to visit). Trust me, there have been volumes written on this here. I think the key is "most recent" 8 pages...does not sound like you have done any but the most skimpy research....San Diego forum will have hundreds if not thousands of entries on this subject.
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Old 01-10-2014, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Encinitas
1,705 posts, read 3,059,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KamikazeK View Post
I have literally gone through the most recent 8 pages on this forum already, and did not see one.

Are you going to answer my question or not?
It's pretty much the same deal as in any city. Bad generally means higher than average crime rate, lower than average property values, more transitory rather than long-term residents, graffiti, stores going out of business, etc. The kind of place where you don't feel all that safe walking alone at night. Now, as to what San Diego neighborhoods qualify as bad, I wouldn't touch that with a 10-foot pole.
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Old 01-10-2014, 11:52 AM
 
2,147 posts, read 2,373,894 times
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Did you try the 'search' button? There are extensive threads on this topic.

I lived in normal heights, a few blocks north of el cajon blvd, for 3 years. there are what are referred to as 'ghetto birds' in SD [actually had those in suburban clairemont hood, too]-police helicopters making announcements about suspects, etc.

Also, more than once there was a murder at the corner of el cajon blvd. and our particular cross street.

And, a homeless guy shot himself at the trolley barn park in the middle of the afternoon-this is a popular park with families/hipsters/kids, and also shared with the many homeless and drug dealers. [I was lucky that day to have taken my kids to get cocoa before we went to the park. We showed up when it was taped off and police were there, but no body].

This particular area is hit or miss and there are great blocks. And This area is not considered 'the' worst of SD. I have lots of anecdotes, but it's not compton or chicago, by any means.

SD is a heavy police presence city, too. You can also research that topic.

That said, if you check stats, SD has low violent crime relative to others cities of its size, and even relative to many smaller cities. I agree with the notion that it a safe big city. I am a female and have lived here for 10 years. I generally feel safe walking at night. The main crimes are car breakins and theft, in my experience of living in 3 vastly different areas of the city, both upscale and semi-hood. [Had both of our cars stolen at different times; both were eventually returned, though].
Even in the more hard core hoods, it's not quite as tense or vigilant [obviously that may differ for someone living there] as other cities. Violent crime is statistically low in SD. It's too laid back for that-lol. Plenty of people live in 'iffy' areas and have nice family lives and experience no crime incidents. SD is not easy to categorize in this way.

I cannot think of anyplace in SD that I wouldn't visit or drive through, at least during the day. The auto repair shop we use is in the 'hood', and we'll walk around while waiting, go to stores, eat Pho, whatever....Even driving down El Cajon blvd is more colorful than dangerous-good ethnic food, etc. I probably would not visit and walk around at night, however. Just not worth the interaction risk. But just to give you an idea-there are places in other cities that one would not drive through [Miami comes to mind-the locals in the car said 'lock your door, roll up your window]. Smash and grab seems almost ubiquitous in some cities, like SFO. SD is not quite as guaranteed or pervasive. [though still stupid to leave stuff on the seat in your car, of course.]

Check the SD city search feature in the upper right ['search this forum'] and use related terms 'crime in SD', 'Is SD safe', that sort of thing...you'll get past thread results and hours of reading entertainment. (:

Last edited by lrmsd; 01-10-2014 at 12:04 PM..
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Old 01-10-2014, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Lemon Grove, CA, 91945
4,536 posts, read 4,829,119 times
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Great question.

Bad neighborhoods generally fit a profile not unlike other metro areas around the US, albeit far far tamer without such drastic extremes in population density and crime type/levels not nearly as dynamic. Some locals can be down right provincial about 'bad' vs 'good' actually. Its cute in a shallow kind of way. But for the more astute, these folks will refer to say 'undesirable' rather than bad.

By local standards, typically, the neighborhoods that are run down looking and have little to no uniformity in upkeep for both residential or commercial areas. Bars on windows, dumpy unkept properties, check cashing stores, smoke shops, liquor stores, citizenry of a suspicious looking nature walking about or loitering.
This is apart from actual crime statistics, which are easily searchable.

The only offsetting detail is a gentrifying former bad neighborhood which hasnt changed physically except for its new 'cool' elements which have spruced up the area. It could be anything from restaurants, bars and a creative element not seen in the real 'bad' parts which may look near identical in age but different in business execution. eg. check cashing place turned cool beer tasting room.

On several occasions, the commercial district may be very different to its residential district. Which is the case in the city where I live where its very quiet almost boring but the commercial area is quite busy and from shoppers from surrounding areas as well as locally.
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Old 01-10-2014, 12:10 PM
 
2,147 posts, read 2,373,894 times
Reputation: 1507
To answer the question by area [without detail] for the OP:
Logan Heights
City Heights/Azalea Park
SE San Diego
Skyline
are good places to start your research. Also use those cities in the 'search feature'.

These are places that are often mentioned as the 'bad areas' of SD.
That said, city heights has a new urban garden movement, and the farmer's market was going strong awhile back, even accepting EBT for people to use food stamps. And it was locally involved, too-not just outsider gentrification.
Also, the Waldorf School of sd [small, private, upscale, alternative school] is located in one of these 'bad areas'. People drive their kids in (often in Mercedes) from all over the city; they own their residential building and have been there for decades, as far as I recall. I think i'ts in Skyline, not sure off hand. SD is funny that way-it's hard to categorize and it changes fairly quickly, relative to other cities.
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Old 01-10-2014, 12:13 PM
 
2,147 posts, read 2,373,894 times
Reputation: 1507
Quote:
Originally Posted by shmoov_groovzsd View Post
Great question.

Bad neighborhoods generally fit a profile not unlike other metro areas around the US, albeit far far tamer without such drastic extremes in population density and crime type/levels not nearly as dynamic. Some locals can be down right provincial about 'bad' vs 'good' actually. Its cute in a shallow kind of way. But for the more astute, these folks will refer to say 'undesirable' rather than bad.

By local standards, typically, the neighborhoods that are run down looking and have little to no uniformity in upkeep for both residential or commercial areas. Bars on windows, dumpy unkept properties, check cashing stores, smoke shops, liquor stores, citizenry of a suspicious looking nature walking about or loitering.
This is apart from actual crime statistics, which are easily searchable.

The only offsetting detail is a gentrifying former bad neighborhood which hasnt changed physically except for its new 'cool' elements which have spruced up the area. It could be anything from restaurants, bars and a creative element not seen in the real 'bad' parts which may look near identical in age but different in business execution. eg. check cashing place turned cool beer tasting room.

On several occasions, the commercial district may be very different to its residential district. Which is the case in the city where I live where its very quiet almost boring but the commercial area is quite busy and from shoppers from surrounding areas as well as locally.
Yes, this is true re: commercial vs. residential. University Ave and El Cajon Blvd for example, are generally not considered great areas, but away from those, depending on the direction, can be quiet residential.
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Old 01-10-2014, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Barrio Logan/Shelltown
8,844 posts, read 12,557,840 times
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I lived in City Heights, 1/2 block off of El Cajon Blvd for 5 1/2 years, and never had a problem. Even when I walked down the alley late at night to get home, I never had a problem. The only problem I ever had was my slumlord property owner, and peeping tom/pervert of a manager.
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