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Old 09-18-2008, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
855 posts, read 1,408,333 times
Reputation: 359
I think the reason why SDSU is good in science because it partners up with UCSD in some of the programs. Definitely for science, go to UCSD. In general, always go to the best school you can because alot of employers know only the names that stand out and generally, it is harder to get into a better school. So already, you are considered a good prospect employee because you got into that school despite the major.
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Old 09-18-2008, 07:18 PM
 
77 posts, read 271,026 times
Reputation: 48
Default UCSD getting better nowadays?

In 2005, UCSD had a bad rap regarding its faculty. Don't know if this affected UCSD's graduate programs.
See SignOnSanDiego.com > News > Education -- Cram session or classroom?

"Dozens of students say they are seeking the private tutoring to cope with demanding work schedules, intense classroom competition and what many describe as ineffective teaching by UCSD faculty."

"Still, many of Kyner's students say his clear, nurturing teaching style is a welcome antidote to what they often encounter on campus: Professors who barely speak English, give disorganized lectures and dedicate themselves to research, not teaching. "

"Experts say the root of the problem is that universities don't spend enough time preparing professors to teach."

"Carson said the problem is one of sheer volume: 1,790 UCSD students major in economics, making it the second most popular major on campus, after biology. The department can't hire full-time faculty fast enough, and must rely on temporary instructors to teach one-quarter of its undergraduate classes. Unfortunately some lecturers, Carson said, are not as qualified as others. The shortage of professors means classes, even upper-division classes, are massive, routinely between 100 and 150 students."

"In a lecture a few weeks ago, UCSD professor Marc-Andreas Muendler strolled through the aisles of a 200-seat auditorium while explaining international trade concepts in a Power Point presentation.
Under dimmed lighting, he explained the differences between quotas and tariffs. Thirty minutes after the start of class, students were still straggling in. Some nibbled on breakfast bars or fruit. A few sent text messages on their cell phones, hiding the gadgets under the small desks."


UCSD may have improved their quality of teaching after this article. I know a lot of the MMHS grads and the HS grads in North County go to UCSD because it is closer than SDSU. But in regards to graduate school quality, keep searching the Net on information on the quality of graduate education at UCSD and SDSU. People in general, think that UCSD is more highly regarded than SDSU.
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Old 09-18-2008, 10:53 PM
 
Location: SoCal
142 posts, read 420,279 times
Reputation: 66
Come on guys the two schools aren't even close in academic rankings, UCSD is a tier 1 school ranked in the 30's and is probably the 3rd best UC behind Cal and UCLA. SDSU is tier 4 school near the bottom of the Cal State system. USD is a tier 1 school ranked the 100's. It's like comparing Stanford, Harvard or Yale to a UC, there's no comparison despite what the Cal students tell you

For UCSD grad program check this link it lists the rankings of the UCSD grad schools. Some popular areas and rankings below.

Engineering Overall (13)
-bioengineering (2)
-electrical engineering and communications (17)
-computer engineering (17)
-civil and structural engineering (20)
-mechanical engineering (21)
-aerospace engineering (22)
-materials science and engineering (26)
Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) (9)
School of Medicine (14)
Social sciences and humanities
-political science (7)
-economics (10)
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Old 09-19-2008, 07:39 AM
 
Location: San Diego native.
470 posts, read 1,153,196 times
Reputation: 103
Speaking from the perspective of a higher ed professional ...

Once out of graduate school and in to your first career position, the "ranking" of the college you attended doesn't mean a whole lot. The professional connections you make, and professional experience/networking have much greater impact. Alumni connections can certainly be helpful.

The whole ranking system is so overhyped.
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Old 09-19-2008, 08:35 AM
 
77 posts, read 271,026 times
Reputation: 48
Best Graduate Schools 2009
Best Graduate Schools - Education - US News and World Report


Best Executive MBA
Executive MBA - Business - Best Graduate Schools - Education - US News and World Report




SDSU MBA
http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~cba/grad/mba.html


UCSD MBA
http://management.ucsd.edu/mba/


__________________________________________________ _______

But wait... does it really matter for UCSD vs SDSU MBA?


Dick Murphy received his MBA from Harvard and law degree from Stanford. But he was not a good leader.


Jerry Sanders went to SDSU till he was a senior and earned his Bachelors in Public Admininstration from National University. Yet, he seems to be a tiny bit better leader than Dick Murphy.

__________________________________________________ _______


In my honest opinion, earning an MBA probably does not mean a whole lot anymore today than it used to because everyone seems to have this degree. It is just a piece of paper hanging to make you feel worthy. Will having it help? Definitely. Will the institution where you earned it from help? Not much. You don't really put the name of the institution after your MBA signature. You just have the following signature.


John Doe, MBA


To me, as an employer, what matters is your proven record of making money for the company. I don't want a lame duck Harvard-graduate MBA employee who is not making the company any money.

Having an MBA from SDSU proves that this person at least has some ambition, is goal-oriented and is formally educated in business.

It does not matter to me as an employer if the MBA is from SDSU or UCSD. The question is "Will you do a great job of making money for the company?"

UCSD as pertaining to business to me is a red-flag. I had been to the UCSD library. All the people talk about there are equations and academics. I am an SDSU alumni and I hanged out at the SDSU library during my college days. Students talked about real life there. So who is more practical and will succeed in the real world? Dick Murphy was probably not in real world situations when he went to Harvard. Dick Murphy needed the people skills to wheel and deal, handle the sharks and play politics.

A resume listing Ivy schools as an educational background does not impress me anymore except for the ones coming from Stanford, maybe. The first thing that comes to mind is "Is this person shallow?" Then the next thing that comes to mind is "Can this person deliver?" That's the business world, at least. If I need a researcher, scientist, mathematician, and an academic geek/nerd then yes, I will consider the school.

When I see UCSD in the resume, I think of the following: intelligent, socially-impaired, focused, potential to be a leader in research, science-driven, most likely a follower in business but a leader in individual profession.

When I see SDSU in the resume, I think of the following: practical, multi-tasker, business-driven, well-rounded, competitive in business, has social networks, potential to be a leader in business

Last edited by Mira-Mesa-Resident; 09-19-2008 at 08:46 AM..
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Old 09-19-2008, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Rolando, San Diego CA 92115
7,125 posts, read 18,099,341 times
Reputation: 2900
the ranking system does matter for entry level candidates, but it all depends on your major.

If you majored in bioscience at UCSD you are more attractive than the same grad with the same degree from SDSU, period.

But if you majored in business it makes no difference, you start at the bottom with everyone else.

Once you have three years under your belt it makes zero difference unless you went to a top-tier school.
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Old 09-19-2008, 02:41 PM
 
Location: SoCal
142 posts, read 420,279 times
Reputation: 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sassberto View Post
the ranking system does matter for entry level candidates, but it all depends on your major.

If you majored in bioscience at UCSD you are more attractive than the same grad with the same degree from SDSU, period.

But if you majored in business it makes no difference, you start at the bottom with everyone else.

Once you have three years under your belt it makes zero difference unless you went to a top-tier school.
You absolutely right for entry level jobs but if I were hiring someone specific in mind with an MBA, I probably wouldn't hire from any San Diego schools. If you are going to hire someone at a premium with an advanced degree you should hire from the creme of the crop a la a top 25 school in that field. Since we're on the west coast I'd probably show some preference to west coast schools so the top of my list would be: Stanford, Cal, UCLA and USC.

Dick Murphy also had law degree from Stanford but look how that turned out some people just aren't cut out for public office.
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Old 09-19-2008, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Rolando, San Diego CA 92115
7,125 posts, read 18,099,341 times
Reputation: 2900
Quote:
Originally Posted by veg8 View Post
You absolutely right for entry level jobs but if I were hiring someone specific in mind with an MBA, I probably wouldn't hire from any San Diego schools. If you are going to hire someone at a premium with an advanced degree you should hire from the creme of the crop a la a top 25 school in that field. Since we're on the west coast I'd probably show some preference to west coast schools so the top of my list would be: Stanford, Cal, UCLA and USC.
Most companies in San Diego don't want to pay the 125k to top-tier MBA grads anyway. Those guys go to LA, OC, SF. A large number of local execs in San Diego came up via SD colleges.
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Old 09-19-2008, 04:41 PM
 
19 posts, read 64,181 times
Reputation: 16
A lot of the job openings in San Diego are MBA preferred.

Monster Jobs

So, if you have an MBA, there are lots of opportunities. You are already ahead of those who don't have an MBA.
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Old 09-20-2008, 10:15 AM
 
Location: North of the hood, south of the valley
2,963 posts, read 6,616,445 times
Reputation: 2217
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mira-Mesa-Resident View Post
In 2005, UCSD had a bad rap regarding its faculty. Don't know if this affected UCSD's graduate programs.
See SignOnSanDiego.com > News > Education -- Cram session or classroom?

"Dozens of students say they are seeking the private tutoring to cope with demanding work schedules, intense classroom competition and what many describe as ineffective teaching by UCSD faculty."

"Still, many of Kyner's students say his clear, nurturing teaching style is a welcome antidote to what they often encounter on campus: Professors who barely speak English, give disorganized lectures and dedicate themselves to research, not teaching. "

"Experts say the root of the problem is that universities don't spend enough time preparing professors to teach."

"Carson said the problem is one of sheer volume: 1,790 UCSD students major in economics, making it the second most popular major on campus, after biology. The department can't hire full-time faculty fast enough, and must rely on temporary instructors to teach one-quarter of its undergraduate classes. Unfortunately some lecturers, Carson said, are not as qualified as others. The shortage of professors means classes, even upper-division classes, are massive, routinely between 100 and 150 students."
From personal experience (though a while ago), I can vouch for the total accuracy of these comments. I had to drop calculus twice because of absolutely terrible foreign instructors. Eventually, I quit going to class entirely, and only went to the study sessions because it was taught by a native English speaker who actually explained calculus rather than reciting what was in the book.

However, this doesn't mean that the instruction at SDSU or any other school won't be just as bad. Undergrad students are the necessary inconvenience of our higher educational system. The faculty need them to generate public support for funding the university system, but in reality they wish students would all just go away so that they could spend their time on what really interests them.
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