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Old 06-22-2012, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Bay Area
3,161 posts, read 4,637,360 times
Reputation: 2930

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Quote:
Originally Posted by andyadhi01 View Post
Not everyone has married into prosperity yet! So they will whine.. Too bad they can't drop a million from their spouses account to buy that house in sf
Uh, I didn't marry into prosperity, you moron...I created wealth by not being a whiny, do nothing, ignorant bore like you, used my brain and made good long term decisions and investments so I wouldn't be a sad renter with nothing to show for it later in life.

In fact, when I met my husband he was an unemployed teacher and I made 9 bucks an hour with a kid on the way. I moved to less desirable cheaper place like Sacramento when San Francisco got too expensive and built my shi* up rather than complain endlessly about crap, bore the heck out of people with nothing of any value to say, and whine to strangers about the weather after two very long years of the same.

Sadly, you are still the same depressed complainer after still making no progress whatsoever at leaving the place you despise so much. Again, your redundancy and laziness speaks volumes about you. If you don't like being such a retarded dolt, then change it. Otherwise, don't pretend you know me or anything about me because you're wrong EVERY single time you write something intended on insulting me.
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Old 06-22-2012, 09:23 PM
 
10,151 posts, read 14,937,193 times
Reputation: 6130
Quote:
Originally Posted by fashionguy View Post
Second this. Outside of the City it is super EASY to get an apartment in a big complex if you don't care much about certain amenities. Granted still expensive but getting one is no problem.
Have you tried doing this in the past six months? We applied for a wide range of apartments outside of SF, including some large, uninspiring complexes, and there were still a ton of other people putting in applications. We even tried to look at one place in Pleasanton and it rented before we could get there to look at it. I think it's MUCH easier outside of the city, but these days I think the tight rental market has made its impact felt far beyond city borders. I just don't think as easy as some people on here think, that's all.
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Old 06-22-2012, 09:37 PM
 
1,553 posts, read 1,917,616 times
Reputation: 1009
Quote:
Originally Posted by clongirl View Post
I created wealth by not being a whiny, do nothing, ignorant bore like you, used my brain and made good long term decisions and investments so I wouldn't be a sad renter with nothing to show for it later in life.
Did you also create some jobs while you created that wealth? Every single braggart I know either got their money from daddy or hubby... So keep trying to convince otherwise! Hard working women who earn their wealth don't have the luxury to sit in home with their kids doing nothing.
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Old 06-22-2012, 09:55 PM
 
Location: A bit further north than before
1,522 posts, read 1,840,196 times
Reputation: 1198
Quote:
Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
Have you tried doing this in the past six months? We applied for a wide range of apartments outside of SF, including some large, uninspiring complexes, and there were still a ton of other people putting in applications. We even tried to look at one place in Pleasanton and it rented before we could get there to look at it. I think it's MUCH easier outside of the city, but these days I think the tight rental market has made its impact felt far beyond city borders. I just don't think as easy as some people on here think, that's all.

Not myself, but friends just moved from Soma to Burlingame, spent a couple weekends looking at places and walked away with a lease and keys pretty much right away.
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Old 06-22-2012, 10:05 PM
 
1,553 posts, read 1,917,616 times
Reputation: 1009
Quote:
Originally Posted by micmac99 View Post
All this in a supposedly "liberal" part of America.
Why is that surprising? It's the 'liberal' areas which always have more racism, classism, crime and wealth gap! The liberals win election because there are too many victims in these areas who vote liberal to correct what's wrong...
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Old 06-23-2012, 02:40 AM
 
1,230 posts, read 2,384,561 times
Reputation: 553
Of course. I looked for an apartment three months ago all over the bay area. I honestly don't know what you are talking about. All apartment complexes I visited try to convince me to put in the holding deposit right away and several even followed up to ask me to visit again. I put in several applications and most of them are approved right away. I never had to go to any open house.

Due to change of my personal situation, I'll be looking again and it is the same situation. I never experienced people fighting for an apartment. Some apartments come and go quickly but there are always plenty others coming up so I never fight for them and just move on. I feel I am in control and in the end it still depends on what I want in the apartment and how much I want to pay. I honestly don't understand why you exaggerate the situation so much. Are you a landlord trying to pump up price? Granted I didn't look at too many places within the City but outside the city I can safely tell you it is not like what you described. Plenty of apartments post the same ad on craigslist for weeks before they are finally rented out. The complexes charge a little bit more than individual owners but most of them provide services such as package receiving which for a single working professional who's never home during business hours is very important. You pay a little bit more to get rid of all the hassle of fighting the apartment. Most likely it is worth it. The headache will be there are too many choices to choose from and none of them quite suit all your needs so you'll have to decide which aspect you're willing to compromise. Getting a place is never a problem.

For the record apartment hunting is never a fun process and I hate it as well, but it is still more like buying a used car than applying for a scholarship. Individual owners like the idea of open house rather than just raising the price because for them usually getting the apartment rented out ASAP is more important and provides more financial gain. For most corporate managed complexes, raising the price and testing the market is always the more efficient way to earn more money because the cost of letting several units sitting there for a while pales in comparison to what they can get if the raised price is proved to be successful. For them if people fight a unit too much, it just means the unit is not priced well, and they'll for sure raise the price for the next unit in order to optimize their financial gain. So there will never be a fierce fighting situation there unless the corporate is stupid. You keep saying your income is much more than able to afford the apartments you are looking for, and fighting apartments is causing so much hassle. In that case you should just raise your bugget and look at corporate managed complexes, you'll find the situation much different.

Quote:
Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
Have you tried doing this in the past six months? We applied for a wide range of apartments outside of SF, including some large, uninspiring complexes, and there were still a ton of other people putting in applications. We even tried to look at one place in Pleasanton and it rented before we could get there to look at it. I think it's MUCH easier outside of the city, but these days I think the tight rental market has made its impact felt far beyond city borders. I just don't think as easy as some people on here think, that's all.

Last edited by fashionguy; 06-23-2012 at 03:27 AM..
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Old 06-23-2012, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Bay Area
3,161 posts, read 4,637,360 times
Reputation: 2930
Quote:
Originally Posted by andyadhi01 View Post
Did you also create some jobs while you created that wealth? Every single braggart I know either got their money from daddy or hubby... So keep trying to convince otherwise! Hard working women who earn their wealth don't have the luxury to sit in home with their kids doing nothing.
Uh, okay. Funny how your imagine runs wild when you don't have anything else going on in life.

You need a better hobby than following me around/stalking me and not posting anything of value or interest year after year. You also seem terribly jealous whenever you engage me. Perhaps if you had a pet or a girlfriend or even just a friend? I dunno, perhaps not possible- you're creepy. Good luck, you'll obviously need it since you got nothing else. Oh, and at the very least, try to stay on topic... that's done by learning how to read.
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Old 06-23-2012, 11:07 AM
 
10,151 posts, read 14,937,193 times
Reputation: 6130
One thing about those apartment rentals that are listed for weeks: sometimes that just means that they collect applications for a few weeks. It doesn't necessarily mean that they have an opening. Or they run near perma-ads; I called a couple of places and despite the CL ads they had no openings. We definitely ran into that in San Francisco, but also encountered that in Berkeley and Alameda. We started looking at places that were at the top of our budget, didn't have any luck, and dropped consistently down until we did find something. We didn't look at that many corporate big complexes, but we did look at some, and they DID have open houses with multiple applicants. Maybe we were simply looking in locations that were desirable (we have a school-age kid, so were not looking in areas with a terrible zoned elementary school, and also do not own a car, and needed to live within easy walking distance of basic amenities, which may have pumped up the competition a bit). In any case, I'm simply describing what we found, certainly in the city, but also in the places we looked at in the East Bay. Obviously there may be locations that are easier than others, and maybe it's also easier now that it's summer. Or maybe it was that we were looking at 2-BRs; I would assume that it is easier to find a 1-BR, as there seem to be more of them around, and quite possible fewer competition for them. (with the 2-BRs we found we were competing against both singles/couples who wanted an extra BR, roommates, and other families with kids) In any case, while we DID find it much easier outside of city limits, it wasn't the walk in the park that you're describing, either, even though we did look at some larger corporate-managed complexes at both the top and the bottom of our budget. If you found it easy then consider yourself lucky. Based on conversations with others I don't think our experience was all that unusual. But again, we were looking for 2-BRs and perhaps our budget was not as robust as yours. If OP is a single guy with no kids, a car and a big salary obviously he will have more flexibility in terms of bedrooms, neighborhood, etc., and won't run into the landlords who don't want kids (although at least with the big companies they are more likely to be good about following the laws about tenant discrimination).

ETA: the more I think about it, the more I think that apartment size/number of bedrooms is potentially a big issue in different experiences. Did we know what kind of housing the OP is looking for? If just one person then perhaps one solution is to also be really flexible with space and check out both studios and 1-BRs, for example. It's my impression (could be totally wrong) that there are a lot more 1-BRs out there, and again, since not competing against as many families or roommates who want their own rooms, perhaps the competition is a little less stiff. My experience looking for Bay Area apartment recently has only been with 2-BR apartments (although called a few places advertised as "1+"), which I realize may be part of the reason fashionguy and I have had different experiences. (I also didn't find the corporate managed places to be more expensive; the corporate managed places actually seemed to be a bit cheaper for the 2-BRs than their smaller, independent counterparts, generally speaking)

Last edited by uptown_urbanist; 06-23-2012 at 12:23 PM..
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Old 06-23-2012, 01:39 PM
 
Location: SW MO Aux Arcs
19,273 posts, read 16,632,559 times
Reputation: 17401
Quote:
Originally Posted by andyadhi01 View Post
Did you also create some jobs while you created that wealth? Every single braggart I know either got their money from daddy or hubby... So keep trying to convince otherwise! Hard working women who earn their wealth don't have the luxury to sit in home with their kids doing nothing.
On topic, before we married my wife had her own, three-bedroom apartment - not in the Bay Area but an apartment nonetheless in a nice part of town. She had a job and had been working for years. At the same time she raised her two daughters with absolutely no support of any kind from their father. Now, like me, she has a pension and Social Securityn from her own benefits. You don't get those unless you work.

You must hang around with really low-class women.
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Old 06-23-2012, 01:40 PM
 
Location: San Francisco, CA
7,817 posts, read 4,542,599 times
Reputation: 6433
Quote:
Originally Posted by 7x7er View Post
What kind of weird alternate reality are you living in?



I can now conclude that whatever field you work in that pays enough for you to afford to live in the City, it certainly must not be Economics.

I'm not just talking about building, by the way. Plus, I'm not asking the City to build more. I'm just saying, the ridiculous amount of red-tape hampers private development.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/17/us...sequences.html

"Mr. Karnilowicz estimated that 5 percent of the city’s 212,000 rental units (about 10,600) are kept vacant by landlords who would rather not deal with rent control (others estimate the number is higher, about 25,000 units)."



That's great for the population of middle class and seniors that were in their apartments in the immediate aftermath of rent control passing in '79, AND never had any reason to move. Not so great for every other person. And as that generation of folks passes on (and their apartments open up), unless things change every rent-controlled apartment on the market will be occupied only be the people that can afford the insane market rates which have been inflated by City tampering in the market. Was that the intent of rent control? I doubt it. But, when it comes to tampering with the market, intent of the tampering and the actual effects of the tampering rarely do align.
First of all, I do agree that rent control is a generally bad policy that produces unintended negative consequences. It does have an economic impact of curtailing supply, because it marginally discourages developers from producing new rental units and furnishing existing ones. But what I would challenge is any implication that the rental market here would look like Cleveland if we got rid of it.

Yes, it would have a somewhat positive impact on supply, but how much supply are we really talking about? Even with rent control, it's still going to be a better deal for the large majority landlord to get revenue-paying people in their unit than to let it sit vacant and being just a cost center for them. And SF has a really high population density combined with natural land restrictions on three sides of it. So even with whatever boost in supply...I highly doubt that it's going to get a $60K-a-year teacher living in Pac Heights.

Furthermore, when you remove the rent control and the supply remains largely curtailed, you may easily find that rents stay similarly high or go even higher. Those who were lucky enough to get in two or three decades ago to pay 50% below market price will quickly be forced to leave, and the new capacity will be rented to another set of very wealthy tenants who are safe credit risks, easily able to handle big price increases, and likely will move in a few years. Don't think that landlords can't practice de facto economic discrimination - they tread carefully and read between the lines quite well.

The simple fact is that this bay has a greater concentration of wealth than just about anywhere else in the United States of America - it's way more than you even perceive when you walk around SF or drive down to Silicon Valley. It's just not like the population in Cleveland. That kind of demand population combined with constrained supply in a desirable city with unique high-end industries will always produce strong upward pricing pressure.
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