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Old 05-08-2013, 08:56 PM
 
Location: US
17,932 posts, read 17,857,033 times
Reputation: 13935

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulemutt View Post
You want to camp out under bridges and in city parks? What's holding you back? Anyone can be homeless, no one's stopping you. Get in on the fun, festive lifestyle. Very chic. You'll love it.
Considering my friend was paying a crap load of money for a shabby apartment in Tenderloin, I could set one up and probably get $500 per month especially if they setup free bathroom and shower facilities. My point is we should all have the same rights.
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Old 05-08-2013, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Where the Wild Things Are
604 posts, read 1,100,656 times
Reputation: 261
You do have the same rights. March on down there and camp out. Then when they roust ya and find out you have an address they might 5150 ya, just for the experience of it. Or maybe just stay home, you will be better off.
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Old 05-08-2013, 09:50 PM
 
Location: the illegal immigrant state
757 posts, read 1,469,102 times
Reputation: 1019
Quote:
This would extend to parks for the entire 24-hour day, regardless of whether the park has hours that it is closed

Read more: Scaled-down homeless rights law advances - SFGate
Would that be 24-7 as in 24-7-365?

I'm suddenly reminded of St. James Park in San Jose which is infested daily with freeloaders repelling families and anyone else from the park. Now it'll be infested all day and all night, all year! Yay!

This should kill off any potential the park and the nearby Church of Christ, Scientist, may have had.
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Old 05-09-2013, 05:59 AM
 
7,150 posts, read 8,807,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sjnative View Post
Would that be 24-7 as in 24-7-365?

I'm suddenly reminded of St. James Park in San Jose which is infested daily with freeloaders repelling families and anyone else from the park. Now it'll be infested all day and all night, all year! Yay!

This should kill off any potential the park and the nearby Church of Christ, Scientist, may have had.
Or the "authorities" could keep them out of the park so they could mill around on the streets in front of stores and sit at bus stops, etc. and you could complain about them being there instead. What about "they have no place to go" do you not grasp? Wait, I forgot, we should bus them to the state line and shove them off on Nevada. My bad. That solves the underlying problem -- which is: sjnative doesn't like people who aren't as fortunate as he is.
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Old 05-09-2013, 06:44 AM
 
1,975 posts, read 2,726,751 times
Reputation: 3507
"A society is measured by how it treats the weak and vulnerable." (No one seems to know exactly who said this first.)

I volunteered with and for the homeless for 20 years. Most of them are mentally ill, to a lesser or greater extent.
Every person is entitled to food, shelter, clothing, and basic medical care. The homeless are human beings, like you and I. What is the matter with us that we can't understand that?

Stay out on the streets for one week -- do it in winter -- even in Southern CA -- with no money and no friend or relative making sure you are fed and ok. Maybe you will develop some compassion.

Every city in The US should have public places where the homeless can use the restrooms, take a shower, wash their clothes, sleep, and have hot meals. Without having to listen to a religious sermon. And on our tax dollar? You bet. Not one single homeless person is on the streets because they are just 'lazy'. At least I never knew one who was -- and I knew a lot.
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Old 05-09-2013, 07:24 AM
 
7,150 posts, read 8,807,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fran66 View Post
"A society is measured by how it treats the weak and vulnerable." (No one seems to know exactly who said this first.)

I volunteered with and for the homeless for 20 years. Most of them are mentally ill, to a lesser or greater extent.
Every person is entitled to food, shelter, clothing, and basic medical care. The homeless are human beings, like you and I. What is the matter with us that we can't understand that?

Stay out on the streets for one week -- do it in winter -- even in Southern CA -- with no money and no friend or relative making sure you are fed and ok. Maybe you will develop some compassion.

Every city in The US should have public places where the homeless can use the restrooms, take a shower, wash their clothes, sleep, and have hot meals. Without having to listen to a religious sermon. And on our tax dollar? You bet. Not one single homeless person is on the streets because they are just 'lazy'. At least I never knew one who was -- and I knew a lot.
Good posts and thanks for your work with the homeless.

Minor correction: I don't agree that the majority of today's homeless are mentally ill -- other than by the pressures of their situation bringing on depression and other struggles of circumstance. Not in current times. More and more perfectly capable people are finding themselves impoverished through strictly economic forces at work in the past decade.
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Old 05-09-2013, 07:43 AM
 
1,975 posts, read 2,726,751 times
Reputation: 3507
Quote:
Originally Posted by nullgeo View Post
Good posts and thanks for your work with the homeless.

Minor correction: I don't agree that the majority of today's homeless are mentally ill -- other than by the pressures of their situation bringing on depression and other struggles of circumstance. Not in current times. More and more perfectly capable people are finding themselves impoverished through strictly economic forces at work in the past decade.
You are correct. But there are two kinds of homeless: families and single people who have lost their homes because of financial problems/economic troubles. They are far more likely to be in a shelter and getting help because homeless shelters/volunteers know that these people just need some help to get back on their feet. Then there are the street homeless, who are mentally ill and/or who have been on the streets for years and who are second class citizens even among the homeless. Now these divisions are not strict -- as I gather you know -- because single men who have just lost their jobs/homes, etc., are more likely to be out on the streets too. And even older people (55+) who have lost their jobs can easily be out on the streets (depending on what city they are living in). But there are still divisions.

Regular people -- who haven't lost their jobs and their homes -- those who are employed and have a house/apt. to live in -- don't realize that the homeless tend to be a 'problem' because we have made them a problem. There are plenty of things that we could do to help them, but -- we care for stray pets better than we do for the homeless.
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Old 05-09-2013, 07:46 AM
 
1,975 posts, read 2,726,751 times
Reputation: 3507
Quote:
Originally Posted by nullgeo View Post
Good posts and thanks for your work with the homeless.

Minor correction: I don't agree that the majority of today's homeless are mentally ill -- other than by the pressures of their situation bringing on depression and other struggles of circumstance. Not in current times. More and more perfectly capable people are finding themselves impoverished through strictly economic forces at work in the past decade.
PS: And if they are not mentally ill, a year or two or three on the streets will easily make them that way.

When I say 'mentally ill' -- I don't mean raving lunatics that should be locked up in a mental ward. I'm talking about being mentally ill enough not to be able to hold down any type of job.
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Old 05-09-2013, 08:18 AM
 
7,150 posts, read 8,807,705 times
Reputation: 3806
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fran66 View Post
You are correct. But there are two kinds of homeless: families and single people who have lost their homes because of financial problems/economic troubles. They are far more likely to be in a shelter and getting help because homeless shelters/volunteers know that these people just need some help to get back on their feet. Then there are the street homeless, who are mentally ill and/or who have been on the streets for years and who are second class citizens even among the homeless. Now these divisions are not strict -- as I gather you know -- because single men who have just lost their jobs/homes, etc., are more likely to be out on the streets too. And even older people (55+) who have lost their jobs can easily be out on the streets (depending on what city they are living in). But there are still divisions.

Regular people -- who haven't lost their jobs and their homes -- those who are employed and have a house/apt. to live in -- don't realize that the homeless tend to be a 'problem' because we have made them a problem. There are plenty of things that we could do to help them, but -- we care for stray pets better than we do for the homeless.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fran66 View Post
PS: And if they are not mentally ill, a year or two or three on the streets will easily make them that way.

When I say 'mentally ill' -- I don't mean raving lunatics that should be locked up in a mental ward. I'm talking about being mentally ill enough not to be able to hold down any type of job.
Yep ... across the board ... spot on.

I'll add one more sub-category that is becoming quite substantial: the working homeless. There are lots of people with jobs who live in their cars these days ... and that number is growing even as the economy slowly grinds back into motion.
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Old 05-09-2013, 09:03 AM
 
1,975 posts, read 2,726,751 times
Reputation: 3507
Quote:
Originally Posted by nullgeo View Post
Yep ... across the board ... spot on.

I'll add one more sub-category that is becoming quite substantial: the working homeless. There are lots of people with jobs who live in their cars these days ... and that number is growing even as the economy slowly grinds back into motion.
You're absolutely right. I don't know much about this because I stopped volunteering in 2006, before The Great Recession.
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