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Old 07-26-2018, 10:13 AM
 
1,621 posts, read 2,853,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motorcyclejournal View Post
Thanks everyone for the quick and thoughtful replies! I've never lived in a 'big city' hence the apprehension to moving to one although I have always enjoyed visiting and my brother who lives in San Francisco. I'm just paying so little for rent $1k that $2k rents seem like a lot even on my salary (I know Bay Area prices; I'll get used to them I'm told). I have caught some tidbits of information regarding buying property in Richmond or even Vallejo but I would have to do more research. I am completely aware of the fires in Santa Rosa since even Napa had them (I had to evacuate).

To answer some questions
1) Free time? I think typical mid 20's hobbies (drink, eat, music-have guitar, gym, volunteer) but also have a motorcycle and a truck for camping
2) I will not have to commute to Napa once I make my decision apart from picking up a few orders of wine
3) I actually checked out Petaluma a few days ago. I remember driving through it as a kid and totally thought it was just another cow-town (SF housing probably pushed people out there and thus now its a bit livelier). Thought it was 'quaint' and had a artsy feel to downtown. Also relatively 'close' to SF on a good day

I do agree with the last post regarding city living in my 20's rather than living in a more suburban-family oriented place. As of now I'm leaning towards the Richmond position. I appreciate the info regarding El Sobrante as perhaps in the waay future I can live out there away from the hustle and bustle. Ill have to hang out in the East Bay this weekend and visit Santa Rosa one more time to cement-in my decision.
to experience oakland
I would advise checking out the grand lake farmers market and having Brunch somewhere like Boot and Shoe service.
" a de facto melting pot. Visitors come from all directions — posh estates in the hills, mid-century apartments around the lake, urbane downtown lofts, modest homes in Eastlake and North Oakland neighborhoods — to shop for produce and crafts, dine on prepared foods, enjoy entertainment, and take in the life-affirming sights and sounds of others doing the same. Every Saturday morning throughout the year, the market bustles — fresh, vibrant, diverse, laidback, and 100-percent Oakland."
https://www.eastbayexpress.com/oakla...Of?oid=1921549

also check out the First Friday (music art and food fair) very good scene for a mid 20 y/o
1st friday of each month
https://www.oaklandfirstfridays.org/
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Old 07-29-2018, 02:41 AM
 
6,415 posts, read 5,671,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
OMG is that sweet. I had no idea you could get that for under $1 million anywhere in the Bay Area, except in the Delta which is only the Bay Area by a wild stretch of the imagination.

I want it.

Unfortunately I live in Chicago and SD. Fortunately that leaves it for somebody else.
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Old 07-29-2018, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Living rent free in your head
37,034 posts, read 17,152,362 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
OP, if your job is in Richmond, IMO you should buy (not rent) in east Richmond, in the hills. You should grab a piece of RE NOW, because that market has begun to take off, as one of the last semi-affordable areas of the Inner East Bay. Act now, or you'll never get such an opportunity again. You'll be making enough, that you could afford it, IF you go for it ASAP. Even as we speak, some properties in the east Richmond area are being ridiculously overbid above listing price, as people scramble to get that precious toehold on E Bay property.

Also: are you aware that the Santa Rosa area just had a huge, devastating fire? Go for Richmond. SE Richmond, bordering El Cerrito, will be a little pricier than the rest of that area, but it will give you proximity to easy El Cerrito and Berkeley shopping districts, restaurants, and the Berkeley "scene". Check out RE listings, just to get an idea, and bear in mind that listing price =/= selling price. Look up some "sold" listings, too. You're very fortunate to have that salary. Make the most of the opportunity it offers.
https://www.trulia.com/p/ca/richmond...05--2356589283
What a gorgeous house, nice area too. It looks like a McGregor. McGregor was a local builder during the 20s-40s, in Albany Richmond and parts of Oakland. His homes are still sought after. https://patch.com/california/albany/...lder-of-albany
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Old 07-29-2018, 06:34 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
What a gorgeous house, nice area too. It looks like a McGregor. McGregor was a local builder during the 20s-40s, in Albany Richmond and parts of Oakland. His homes are still sought after. https://patch.com/california/albany/...lder-of-albany
McGregor said,

"There were so many 25-foot lots and it was hard to do anything with them," said Boggs, who once worked in her father's office. "He worked with a man who never finished his architecture course but he drew very good plans. He and my father worked together to make the plans for the little houses on the 25-foot lots."

I live on a 25-foot lot (25 x 175, very deep). The Victorian "architect" (basically a small landowner who did his own construction) and my rehabber managed to squeeze 2200 square feet of luxury onto it. Here's a pic:

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Old 07-29-2018, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Living rent free in your head
37,034 posts, read 17,152,362 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Siegel View Post
McGregor said,

"There were so many 25-foot lots and it was hard to do anything with them," said Boggs, who once worked in her father's office. "He worked with a man who never finished his architecture course but he drew very good plans. He and my father worked together to make the plans for the little houses on the 25-foot lots."

I live on a 25-foot lot (25 x 175, very deep). The Victorian "architect" (basically a small landowner who did his own construction) and my rehabber managed to squeeze 2200 square feet of luxury onto it. Here's a pic:
Awesome house! Reminds me of New Orleans shotgun houses but I think those were narrower. When I was a kid I lived in Richmond in a house on a 25' wide lot it was kind of cool because my bedroom was in the very back of the house so when I had sleepovers we could stay awake half the night giggling and carrying on and my parents never heard a thing
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Old 07-31-2018, 12:57 AM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area, California
522 posts, read 554,054 times
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Santa Rose and Richmond are both great towns, they're both very different from each other, but both have a lot of good things.

Santa Rosa has a nice downtown area with a ton of breweries, upscale restaurants, bookstores, record stores and other stuff like that. It's a nice town, but it's pretty far from San Francisco, which is the epicenter of Northern California. There's also a huge homelessness issue in Santa Rosa that is very visible.

Richmond is a town with a ton of potential. The city is gorgeous and has more shoreline on the the Bay than any other city in the San Francisco Bay Area due to its unique geography. The problem Richmond has always seemed to struggle with is its high crime rate. In 2009 Richmond had the second highest homicide rate in the United States. Even then, crime didn't define the entire city. Point Richmond has always been a very upscale neighborhood with beautiful Victorian homes and views of the Golden Gate Bridge and the SF skyline. The East Richmond hills are also a tremendous neighborhood. Very artsy, and has views. If you want something more suburban, the Hilltop area of Richmond is also pretty nice. El Sobrante is another option, especially if you want a house on a large lot. However, there are some very dangerous areas in Richmond you'll want to avoid: North Richmond, the Iron Triangle, Laurel Park, Belding Woods, and Shields Reid to name a few.
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Old 08-01-2018, 04:42 PM
 
53 posts, read 39,475 times
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I live in East Richmond Heights and work in West Oakland, 8 to 5.

I avoid I-80 both ways, I much prefer a relaxing drive on less-congested arterial back roads. My morning commute is ~35 minutes and my afternoon commute is ~50 minutes. I usually take Richmond Ave, maybe cut over to San Pablo Ave, maybe cut over to 6th street, depending on traffic flow. Alternatively I take Arlington Ave sometimes.

East Richmond Heights is a great place to live. BART is easily accessible, Berkeley is nearby, the Richmond/San Rafael Bridge is nearby. East Richmond Point, Wildcat Canyon Park... I go see a lot of live music, good venues in the city and east bay and north bay are accessible from here.

I would say check out East Richmond Heights; also Point Richmond - Same plus'es as East Richmond Heights, and a super high walk score with lots of bars and cafes/restaurants within walking distance. However, Point Richmond real estate is more expensive than East Richmond heights.

Last edited by jonnydoe; 08-01-2018 at 04:44 PM.. Reason: punctuation
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Old 08-01-2018, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Richmond, CA
897 posts, read 719,472 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PixelatedTherapy View Post
However, there are some very dangerous areas in Richmond you'll want to avoid: North Richmond, the Iron Triangle, Laurel Park, Belding Woods, and Shields Reid to name a few.
Laurel Park (west of El Cerrito del Norte BART Station) is okay nowadays.

Belding Woods (north of Richmond BART Station) is still a little rough around the edges, but it's changed for the better in the past few years. I would not have walked around it 5 years ago, but now I'm comfortable there during daylight hours. Nighttime hours vary by block.
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Old 08-02-2018, 06:14 PM
 
1,621 posts, read 2,853,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonnydoe View Post
I live in East Richmond Heights and work in West Oakland, 8 to 5.

I avoid I-80 both ways, I much prefer a relaxing drive on less-congested arterial back roads. My morning commute is ~35 minutes and my afternoon commute is ~50 minutes. I usually take Richmond Ave, maybe cut over to San Pablo Ave, maybe cut over to 6th street, depending on traffic flow. Alternatively I take Arlington Ave sometimes.

East Richmond Heights is a great place to live. BART is easily accessible, Berkeley is nearby, the Richmond/San Rafael Bridge is nearby. East Richmond Point, Wildcat Canyon Park... I go see a lot of live music, good venues in the city and east bay and north bay are accessible from here.

I would say check out East Richmond Heights; also Point Richmond - Same plus'es as East Richmond Heights, and a super high walk score with lots of bars and cafes/restaurants within walking distance. However, Point Richmond real estate is more expensive than East Richmond heights.
The reverse commute from NOBE north Oakland ,south Berkeley emeryville to Richmond is around 15-20minutes in the morning and 25-35minutes in the evening
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Old 08-05-2018, 02:16 AM
 
Location: San Francisco, CA
128 posts, read 121,956 times
Reputation: 316
I don't know about you guys but I've been both Richmond and Oakland enough times to realize they're mostly ghettos. This is especially true about Richmond as Oakland does have a few decent neighborhoods. If the OP is young and makes decent money I'd look into living in the City or close to it. There is plenty of time to move to suburbs later.
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