U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > San Francisco - Oakland
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 10-23-2018, 09:37 AM
 
4,694 posts, read 2,064,127 times
Reputation: 3299

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Well, if you're throwing those options out there, why not San Luis Obispo, Cambria, or Morro Bay? But a better compromise, IMO, would be a townhome in Marin somewhere, or Sonoma. Gualala? Ft. Bragg??
I'm just being realistic. In his response to you he estimates townhouses in Marin to be $500,000. On my street in Oakland, townhouses go for $800,000 so I would assume one would add a couple hundred thousand to a townhouse in Marin (or are we talking Marin City - I think that is a low income area???). Bottom line, guy needs to talk to a bank and find out how much he can afford and then talk to a realtor. Until then, what is the point.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-23-2018, 10:01 AM
 
215 posts, read 203,160 times
Reputation: 350
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oakformonday View Post
I'm just being realistic. In his response to you he estimates townhouses in Marin to be $500,000. On my street in Oakland, townhouses go for $800,000 so I would assume one would add a couple hundred thousand to a townhouse in Marin (or are we talking Marin City - I think that is a low income area???). Bottom line, guy needs to talk to a bank and find out how much he can afford and then talk to a realtor. Until then, what is the point.
The point is you can never have too much knowledge, and getting ideas from people who might actually be on the ground isn't a bad thing. I do know how much I can afford, which is what prompted this question. I already know I can't afford Marin, at least not the parts I would want to live, which is Southern Marin, which is why my original question had nothing to do with finances, but wanting to know if there are any places other people are aware of that have a similar vibe and attention to beauty that Marin County has.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2018, 10:36 AM
 
2,780 posts, read 3,913,648 times
Reputation: 2265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post

Now, as to weather, CA is unique, of course. But WA isn't that different. The main thing is that it's cool in the summers, like the Bay Area, so you can enjoy being active outdoors. I don't know of anyplace else in the US that's like that, but the West Coast. WA is rainier in the winters, but that's a good thing. Think about it--more rain = more water. It also means there's more variety in the weather, which is something I find enjoyable. WA isn't that much colder in the winters: no snow at the sea-level locations, or only light snow for a couple of days, if any at all.

.
I agree the PNW is relatively mild in winter compared to the East coast or the Midwest, but it's still pretty darn cold. The five coldest months in Seattle and Portland (Nov-Mar) are colder than *any* month in San Francisco, so think of the middle of winter in the Bay Area, then think colder than that -- for nearly half the year. You really *only* get the summers to enjoy. The rest of the year is to be tolerated. Also consider that the PNW has about 100 more days of rain than the Bay Area on average. That's three and a half months of additional rain, if it rained every single day. But more likely, it would rain every other day for 7 months. That's just the extra rain compared to the Bay Area. Add that to Bay Area rain to get an idea. True, it does not snow very often, but it does show, Which is not necessarily a terrible thing, but keep in mind there can be terrible cold snaps and Ice storms. It would not be unusual to have a string of days that never gets above freezing. Also consider the record low temperatures in Portland and Seattle, which hover around zero degrees, compared to 26 in San Francisco. In fact San Francisco has not dropped below freezing in almost 30 years. Just something to think about before moving into an area that far north.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2018, 01:02 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
80,953 posts, read 73,997,511 times
Reputation: 80571
Quote:
Originally Posted by tstieber View Post
I agree the PNW is relatively mild in winter compared to the East coast or the Midwest, but it's still pretty darn cold. The five coldest months in Seattle and Portland (Nov-Mar) are colder than *any* month in San Francisco, so think of the middle of winter in the Bay Area, then think colder than that -- for nearly half the year. You really *only* get the summers to enjoy. The rest of the year is to be tolerated. Also consider that the PNW has about 100 more days of rain than the Bay Area on average. That's three and a half months of additional rain, if it rained every single day. But more likely, it would rain every other day for 7 months. That's just the extra rain compared to the Bay Area. Add that to Bay Area rain to get an idea. True, it does not snow very often, but it does show, Which is not necessarily a terrible thing, but keep in mind there can be terrible cold snaps and Ice storms. It would not be unusual to have a string of days that never gets above freezing. Also consider the record low temperatures in Portland and Seattle, which hover around zero degrees, compared to 26 in San Francisco. In fact San Francisco has not dropped below freezing in almost 30 years. Just something to think about before moving into an area that far north.
Well, being from the Bay Area myself, and having adjusted without a problem to the Seattle weather, I find it difficult to believe that anyone would be such a delicate flower, that they couldn't adjust to colder winter temps (the East Bay got down into the 40's plenty often in winter, and even down into the 30's, on occasion--no different from Seattle, through the first part of the 1990's. Mt. Diablo has been covered with snow several times in the new millennium), and more rain.

If the OP can't imagine coping with that, then maybe he should consider Mexico after all, or a townhome in SLO or elsewhere on the Central Coast, if they have them. Or Ventura. A far cry from Marin, but not such a far cry from the parts of SoCal he's used to. Or maybe coastal towns north of the Bay, as mentioned earlier. Ft. Bragg is nice...

Last edited by Ruth4Truth; 10-23-2018 at 01:48 PM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2018, 01:42 PM
 
2,780 posts, read 3,913,648 times
Reputation: 2265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Well, being from the Bay Area myself, and having adjusted without a problem to the Seattle weather, I find it difficult to believe that anyone would be such a delicate flower, that they could adjust to colder winter temps (the East Bay got down into the 40's plenty often in winter, and even down into the 30's, on occasion--no different from Seattle, through the first part of the 1990's. Mt. Diablo has been covered with snow several times in the new millennium), and more rain.

If the OP can't imagine coping with that, then maybe he should consider Mexico after all, or a townhome in SLO or elsewhere on the Central Coast, if they have them. Or Ventura. A far cry from Marin, but not such a far cry from the parts of SoCal he's used to. Or maybe coastal towns north of the Bay, as mentioned earlier. Ft. Bragg is nice...
How long have you lived in Seattle? It all depends on year to year differences in weather. Of course, the East Bay can dip into the 30s on occasion (even inland San DIego where I live does at night in the winter), but it only averages in the low 40s for high temps in winter, and sooo many rainy days on average, that you just have to be prepared for it. The few times I've been to Seattle have been in July (rainy and cool at first, then boiling hot), October (freezing cold -- like 25 degrees colder than the Bay Area, and 20s at night), and April (six days of sunshine, and people were freaking out about how rare that was). It's definitely a different beast, but not as bad as back east.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2018, 01:54 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
80,953 posts, read 73,997,511 times
Reputation: 80571
Quote:
Originally Posted by tstieber View Post
How long have you lived in Seattle? It all depends on year to year differences in weather. Of course, the East Bay can dip into the 30s on occasion (even inland San DIego where I live does at night in the winter), but it only averages in the low 40s for high temps in winter, and sooo many rainy days on average, that you just have to be prepared for it. The few times I've been to Seattle have been in July (rainy and cool at first, then boiling hot), October (freezing cold -- like 25 degrees colder than the Bay Area, and 20s at night), and April (six days of sunshine, and people were freaking out about how rare that was). It's definitely a different beast, but not as bad as back east.
I don't want to hijack the thread, but you're right about October temp differences between the two regions, definitely. Not to mention Nov., which tends to be balmy in the East Bay, too.

Now that you mention it, I do remember having to buy extra-warm coats and additional wool layers, when I first moved to Seattle, for the winters, when the ground would be ice-cold. I even had to get wool liners for my shoes! (People thought I was crazy.). But over time, the weather got a little milder, and I got used to it being a little colder than NorCal. I still think, that if the OP wants comfortable outdoor weather in the summers, and has exhausted all options in CA, he should consider the NW, but not Seattle, which does get miserably hot (IMO) in the 2nd half of the summer. It's heat island, so that makes it worse. Besides, the OP can't afford the Seattle area. But there are plenty of options elsewhere around the Sound.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2018, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Richmond, CA
622 posts, read 578,028 times
Reputation: 763
OP, there are a few places that come to mind that are more affordable than Marin but might still make you happy... Is the $7K before taxes? If so, I would ballpark your budget at $500K. That can get you something pretty nice if you look in the right areas.

Locally:
* Petaluma - It's cheaper than Marin, has more character than Novato or Rohnert Park/Santa Rosa, and has a good amount of cultural amenities. No SFH at this price point, but maybe a condo.
* Vallejo - You should be able to get a SFH in a nice part of town for your budget. This is going to be your best chance of getting the mix of scenery and character you appreciate in Larkspur. It doesn't have Marin's stuck up white douchiness, though, so you might be in for some culture shock. But you can drive up to Napa if you need a helping, plus the Mexican food in Napa is better than the swill they serve in Marin.

Elsewhere in State:
* San Diego - Consider slightly inland spots like Lemon Grove. Not quite as nice as La Mesa, but not as trailer park-y as Lakeside. San Diego city amenities are a very short drive or Trolley ride away.
* Gold Coast - Oxnard and Ventura are relatively affordable areas. Ventura is nicer, but Oxnard has more things. Pretty sleepy area, but if retirement gets the best of you, LA is a "short" drive or Amtrak/Metrolink train ride away.
* Central Coast - You might be able to settle into the Five Cities area (Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach, Oceano, Pismo Beach, Shell Beach) or Atascadero on your budget. San Luis Obispo is not too far away, and you have winery life not too far away in the Santa Ynez Valley (former) and Paso Robles (latter).
* North Coast - It's a bit off the beaten path and the weather's a bit damp, but Eureka and Arcata might have some good offerings. Doesn't have the trailer park vibe of some other places out that way, but it'll still be a lifestyle change. Bonus seasonal work in the pot fields if you get bored. My aunt (from San Diego) worked in Eureka for a couple years and hated the weather. Probably not too different than some parts of the PNW.

Further Afield:
* Reno, NV
* Santa Fe, NM
* Some parts of OR and WA, as discussed by others.
* Also, perhaps an expat community in Baja.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2018, 04:08 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
80,953 posts, read 73,997,511 times
Reputation: 80571
Quote:
Originally Posted by davdaven View Post
OP, there are a few places that come to mind that are more affordable than Marin but might still make you happy... Is the $7K before taxes? If so, I would ballpark your budget at $500K. That can get you something pretty nice if you look in the right areas.

Locally:
* Petaluma - It's cheaper than Marin, has more character than Novato or Rohnert Park/Santa Rosa, and has a good amount of cultural amenities. No SFH at this price point, but maybe a condo.
* Vallejo - You should be able to get a SFH in a nice part of town for your budget. This is going to be your best chance of getting the mix of scenery and character you appreciate in Larkspur. It doesn't have Marin's stuck up white douchiness, though, so you might be in for some culture shock. But you can drive up to Napa if you need a helping, plus the Mexican food in Napa is better than the swill they serve in Marin.

Elsewhere in State:
* San Diego - Consider slightly inland spots like Lemon Grove. Not quite as nice as La Mesa, but not as trailer park-y as Lakeside. San Diego city amenities are a very short drive or Trolley ride away.
* Gold Coast - Oxnard and Ventura are relatively affordable areas. Ventura is nicer, but Oxnard has more things. Pretty sleepy area, but if retirement gets the best of you, LA is a "short" drive or Amtrak/Metrolink train ride away.
* Central Coast - You might be able to settle into the Five Cities area (Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach, Oceano, Pismo Beach, Shell Beach) or Atascadero on your budget. San Luis Obispo is not too far away, and you have winery life not too far away in the Santa Ynez Valley (former) and Paso Robles (latter).
* North Coast - It's a bit off the beaten path and the weather's a bit damp, but Eureka and Arcata might have some good offerings. Doesn't have the trailer park vibe of some other places out that way, but it'll still be a lifestyle change. Bonus seasonal work in the pot fields if you get bored. My aunt (from San Diego) worked in Eureka for a couple years and hated the weather. Probably not too different than some parts of the PNW.

Further Afield:
* Reno, NV
* Santa Fe, NM

* Some parts of OR and WA, as discussed by others.
* Also, perhaps an expat community in Baja.
OP said he wants to be either on the coast, or on a major body of water. Reno & Santa Fe are out. They're too hot in the summers, as well. And Santa Fe might be too expensive for the OP. There are affordable townhomes for the OP in San Rafael, if he wants to stay in Marin. Vallejo and Benicia are potential good ideas. Vallejo is on the cusp of gentrification. The OP could pick up a nice little Victorian within his price range, and wait out the shift in demographics.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2018, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Park City, UT
640 posts, read 350,688 times
Reputation: 1604
Quote:
Originally Posted by Troy Troy View Post
Due to perks of my job, I have been fortunate to live in areas of California I wouldn't have ordinarily been able to afford myself. One of these areas was Marin County, California. ( Larkspur, to be exact) It was literally one of the most beautiful areas I have ever even visited, much less lived in. I'm saying this as a person who was traveled throughout Europe, and was born and raised in southern California. The problem is, Marin County, along with places like Newport, and Laguna are prohibitively expensive, at least for me! So, it had me thinking, are there any other areas, in States cheaper than California, that have cities similar to what's found in Marin County, or Laguna, Newport, etc,? I'm talking about areas with a upper-income for that area) population, good schools, beautiful scenery, preferably near a body of water, low crime, numerous amenities, village like feel, decent weather , etc.? Trust me, I know California cities are expensive for a reason, because it's hard to find all the things I mentioned above wrapped in one city, unless you're in California. However, I'm hoping there are other areas people have found that are similar in other states, with a slightly lower price tag.
There are certain parts of New England that are as beautiful as Marin county. Of course the environments and climates are quite different.

Some areas of SW Connecticut have heavily wooded neighborhoods that kind of remind me of the neighborhoods in the Mill Valley and Ross areas. And this part of Connecticut is about as affluent as those areas too.

Western Oregon and Washington are probably a closer match to the overall scenery.

As far as climate though, nothing else can beat Marin county.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2018, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Richmond, CA
622 posts, read 578,028 times
Reputation: 763
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
OP said he wants to be either on the coast, or on a major body of water. Reno & Santa Fe are out. They're too hot in the summers, as well. And Santa Fe might be too expensive for the OP. There are affordable townhomes for the OP in San Rafael, if he wants to stay in Marin. Vallejo and Benicia are potential good ideas. Vallejo is on the cusp of gentrification. The OP could pick up a nice little Victorian within his price range, and wait out the shift in demographics.
I get that. Reno is a short drive from Lake Tahoe. In fact, Truckee itself is reasonably affordable. Perhaps he should give that a try. The center of town has some charm.

I wouldn't write off Santa Fe entirely. It has culture. Homes can be had easily for well under $500K. Easy access to a body of water is the main issue. OP may not be able to have his cake and eat it too, so perhaps the body of water will be the thing that drops off the list.

There are a handful of condos currently for sale in San Rafael and Novato for under $500K. Most of the ones in San Rafael have HOA fees of thousands of dollars per month. Of the three that don't, one is not in an area I would buy. That leaves two. At least the options in Novato are more appealing. Assuming you like Novato. Personally, it's not for me.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > San Francisco - Oakland
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top