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Old 10-09-2019, 09:19 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
18,470 posts, read 30,047,493 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by artillery77 View Post
I'd like to thank the poorer neighborhoods that seem to be the ones most likely to be affected by the power outage. Of our rentals, the poorest one is definitely going dark. PGE website went down so, not sure.
Actually it seems like the wealthier areas are the ones most affected. They're mostly hillier areas, poor neighborhoods are in the flatlands.
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Old 10-09-2019, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
28,234 posts, read 34,739,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PedroMartinez View Post
It's a simple fix, homeowners should purchase rooftop solar systems. Apartment owners should raise rent and do the same.
You need more than solar panels - most of they systems don't also come with the storage facilities so you can run on solar alone.
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Old 10-10-2019, 01:38 AM
 
1,254 posts, read 931,695 times
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I saw this on the news and I think it is outrageous. I have never heard of a power company doing this before. There must be more to it than they are saying publicly. Anyone who is affected has my sympathy.
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Old 10-10-2019, 11:57 AM
 
4,711 posts, read 6,596,649 times
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It is stunning how this is rippling through our communities. Some examples:
Injuries and emergency room calls increased for seniors who have no light to get up by during the night; it is hard to manage a walker and a flashlight at the same time. Falls in the dark increased.
Lots of people losing income. If your business has no electricity, you can't work. Can't work remotely, as the computers at work are down.
Lots of people having to pay for child care, as schools are closed.
Now we have water rationing because the water district has limited ability to run treatment plants and pumping facilities.
Many businesses closed, and losing revenue
Some can't get gas because the pumps won't work (it doesn't help to have a generator if you can't fuel it.)
Of course, a lot of food will be wasted in warmed refrigerators and freezers, including grocery and drug stores who may not have enough generated power to make it through a 7 day or more shut-off.
Diabetic patients have to keep insulin refrigerated. The longer this goes on, the more problems we will see with that. (I am not clear on how PG&E keeps the electricity on to a home that is known by them to be dependent on medical technology.)
If people can't use their garage door openers, they can't get in/out. (We should all be making sure our garage door openers have battery back-up, but how many days would that last?)

All this and more because PG&E has done such a terrible job of maintaining and hardening its infrastructure. They prefer to pay shareholders and give bonuses to executives instead. So they have shifted the costs to all the citizens, who pay dearly for this shut-off, rather than paying (for years) for a SAFE grid. This incident really supports the argument that a privately held utility is NOT a good idea, because it will prioritize profit over service, infrastructure updates and safety.
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Old 10-10-2019, 12:23 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
18,470 posts, read 30,047,493 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G Grasshopper View Post
If people can't use their garage door openers, they can't get in/out. (We should all be making sure our garage door openers have battery back-up, but how many days would that last?)
Doesn't every garage door opener have a manual release? I don't get how so many people have never thought about what that string hanging down from their opener does.
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Old 10-10-2019, 01:34 PM
 
4,711 posts, read 6,596,649 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Doesn't every garage door opener have a manual release? I don't get how so many people have never thought about what that string hanging down from their opener does.
You are right. But there are a lot of people who cannot physically do this. You have to be able to lift the door manually. As of July 1, this year, any garage door opener installed must, by law, have a battery back up. You can also have installed a back-up without replacing the opener. I imagine many people are not aware of this new requirement. My question was, if you have a battery back-up, how long will it last? I got a new garage door opener with that back-up about a year ago. But I do not know how long it will go without charging before it is dead, too. This could be a problem if the power is off for a week, as PG&E has warned.
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Old 10-10-2019, 03:29 PM
 
Location: New York NY
5,192 posts, read 7,881,415 times
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Just wondering from afar, reading about all this and seeing it on TV:

It just seems that the PG&E might simply be too big to be effectively managed and that it might be better if it were broken up into two separate companies -- one to actually generate (or buy) power, and a second to transmit and distribute the juice. So instead of a enormously huge and convoluted system, you'd have two smaller companies that specialize in the basics of getting power to the people. Just like industrial conglomerates went out of style decades ago because they were too difficult to manage, perhaps the old model of the investor owned utility that does everything has also passed its prime.

Has anyone in Cali given any serious thought to breaking up PG&E?

And while I guess its not a popular opinion out there, isn't it better to lose power for a few days than see a repeat of the Camp Fire?
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Old 10-10-2019, 04:25 PM
 
4,711 posts, read 6,596,649 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citylove101 View Post
Just wondering from afar, reading about all this and seeing it on TV:

It just seems that the PG&E might simply be too big to be effectively managed and that it might be better if it were broken up into two separate companies -- one to actually generate (or buy) power, and a second to transmit and distribute the juice. So instead of a enormously huge and convoluted system, you'd have two smaller companies that specialize in the basics of getting power to the people. Just like industrial conglomerates went out of style decades ago because they were too difficult to manage, perhaps the old model of the investor owned utility that does everything has also passed its prime.

Has anyone in Cali given any serious thought to breaking up PG&E?

And while I guess its not a popular opinion out there, isn't it better to lose power for a few days than see a repeat of the Camp Fire?
No one wants to see a repeat of any of the huge fires we have had. But it seems like the shut off is happening because of PG&E's failure to put the necessary investments into its infrastructure. That is what angers people.

I totally agree with you that PG&E is a massive system that should be broken up into Municipal power and gas authorities. These should be locally run, government agencies. We need to take the profit motive out of utilities, and have the charges people pay be plowed back into improving the system rather than going to share holders and CEOs. And yes, people have thought about that, but I don't know if there is serious consideration at the state level. This crisis might prove to be useful in proving the point that PG&E is not the agency it should be.
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Old 10-10-2019, 04:34 PM
 
4,150 posts, read 3,293,207 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G Grasshopper View Post
No one wants to see a repeat of any of the huge fires we have had. But it seems like the shut off is happening because of PG&E's failure to put the necessary investments into its infrastructure. That is what angers people.

I totally agree with you that PG&E is a massive system that should be broken up into Municipal power and gas authorities. These should be locally run, government agencies. We need to take the profit motive out of utilities, and have the charges people pay be plowed back into improving the system rather than going to share holders and CEOs. And yes, people have thought about that, but I don't know if there is serious consideration at the state level. This crisis might prove to be useful in proving the point that PG&E is not the agency it should be.
Bingo!

Every customer pays a separate monthly fee for transmission line maintenance. Obviously the lines aren't being maintained if a little wind knocks them down. How hard is it to keep tree limbs trimmed along the power line easements????

This a huge multi-billion dollar corporation that has absolutely no competition. There is absolutely no excuse for this. Turning of the power due to a little wind is absolutely unacceptable. I guess PG&E is admitting that their grid is hardly better than the one in Puerto Rico.

I guess CA really is turning into a 3rd world country.
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Old 10-10-2019, 07:44 PM
 
27,949 posts, read 60,197,021 times
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In the end the customer always pays and CA has some very high rates as it is.

On the other hand tree trimming has been stopped in it's tracks too by neighborhoods and individuals...

It is not like they are going to aerial spray herbicide on the right a way... so trimming and chipping is costly and labor intensive and ongoing...

Power was out just under 19 hours where I am.
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