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Old 08-20-2008, 10:39 PM
 
2,268 posts, read 5,472,942 times
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I see what you're saying. If only we could transplant the bay area weather up here.
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Old 08-27-2008, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Oregon
1,224 posts, read 3,337,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tkindred View Post
Hmm, again, just my opinion. The views across the bay are way more dramatic from many vantage points than the one or two views of the Seattle skyline from Hamilton View Point, etc. There are literally hundreds of scenic views around the Bay in SF. The only view of the cascades from Seattle are from Alki Ave. area. And it is good only around sunset. Thats only about 3 linear miles. Even from the top of the hill you cannot see anything you must be on the waterfront. I have ridden my bike from downtown Seattle all the way down to Woodmont Beach to see if I could get some good vantage points for my photos. Not many. Rode up north too. I have searched all through Seattle for photographic vantage points. Photography of scenery is my hobby. Check it out. Todd E. Kindred's Photo Galleries at pbase.com

Now, riding through Golden Gate Park, across the Golden Gate Bridge, up Conzelman Road through the Golden Gate Recreation Area to pop out on the Pacific Ocean, awesome. Shoreline Highway (California 1) no comparison to anything in Seattle. Muir Woods National Monument with its redwoods. Then the East Bay with Wildcat Canyon and Tildon Regional Parks where from the ridgeline are dramatic views of Oakland, SF, the Bay, the Pacific, the Golden Gate Bridge, Alcatraz, Treasure Island, the Pacific Ocean, etc, all from one vantage point!

Treasure Island, Twin Peaks also nice views. Lincoln Park is very nice in San Fran as well, overlooking the Golden Gate. Then if you want you can head up to the wine country towards Napa.

There are so many neighborhoods in the Bay Area that afford great views. Not so many in Seattle do to its lack of elevation changes and thick tree cover.

Again, this is all opinion.
One thing Seattle has going for it is a good base of operations for outdoors. I think the Olympic National Park begins about 30 miles away as the crow flies, and about 60 miles to Mt. Ranier in a straight line.

Then there is B.C. Canada just to the north, Mt. St. Helens and the Columbia River Gorge to the south, and other places.

How much someone can glean from the Seattle location may depend a lot on how much money they have to spare for recreation.
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Old 09-13-2008, 10:57 PM
 
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I currently live in the Bay Area for work but grew up in Seattle.

The comment about Seattle lacking recreational and biking opportunities is sorta off to me. Drive East 30 minutes of downtown Seattle and go skiing at Snoqualmie Ridge or hiking in many mountains that are several thousand feet in altitude. (Skiing and mountains of this level are not as close in the Bay Area.) Take a ferry from Downtown Seattle 20-30 minutes west and go to Bainbridge/ Vashon Island or a longer ride to Port Townsend. Biking? Look at the various trails throughout the city.

To me, BOTH Seattle and San Francisco offer tremendous opportunities for outdoor recreation nearby. And neither requires a lot of money unless one is into buying a lot of gear.

The main differences to me are:

1. the smaller population and more intimate feel of Seattle compared to San Francisco.

2. Seattle tends to be colder and cloudier than the Bay Area (which is warm and sunny outside of San Francisco (even just 30 minutes south) year around). A big factor for many people.

3. Seattle cost-of-living is lower - esp. if you are trying to buy a house

4. There are more wealthy folks in SF

5. Seattle dress is more casual than SF

6. More trees in Seattle
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Old 11-16-2009, 10:18 AM
 
26 posts, read 41,047 times
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I think Seattle would be a better fit for you if weather isnt a concern. My roommate moved from Seattle and he said that during the winter, his office would give employees a half day if it was sunny outside. ie. once a month

I really love Seattle and have been lucky the 3 times I've been there to have perfect weather, but I'm not sure I could handle the winter grays and rain.
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Old 11-16-2009, 10:44 AM
rah
 
Location: San Francisco
3,101 posts, read 5,067,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LostinCalifornia View Post

That said, if you're coming from California, you might be disappointed by how everything in Seattle seems sort of second-rate, and somewhat depressed. From how the University of Washington area feels (run-down, not worldly--like you're stuck in the middle of nowhere), to Belltown (more urban area near Museum of Art--feels sub-par, lacks sense of world awareness but tries to be hip/cutting edge), to Capitol Hill (arguably Seattle's Mission District, which honestly seems blighted and more seemingly dangerous than the SF counterpart--dark, cars bashed in, gang activity). At least that was my sense.
I know i'm pretty late on this, but The Mission District alone had nearly as many murders in 2008 as the entire city of Seattle (21 murders in the Mission, 29 in Seattle). I'm pretty sure SF's high crime areas, such as the Mission, are worse overall than Seattle's...SF does have a violent crime rate about 300 points higher than Seattle. SF's murder rate is 2 to 3 times higher, the robbery rate is twice as high, and the assault rate in SF is a bit higher too. Seattle does have a slightly higher rape rate.
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Old 11-16-2009, 11:07 PM
 
1,256 posts, read 1,586,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LostinCalifornia View Post
That said, if you're coming from California, you might be disappointed by how everything in Seattle seems sort of second-rate, and somewhat depressed. From how the University of Washington area feels (run-down, not worldly--like you're stuck in the middle of nowhere), to Belltown (more urban area near Museum of Art--feels sub-par, lacks sense of world awareness but tries to be hip/cutting edge), to Capitol Hill (arguably Seattle's Mission District, which honestly seems blighted and more seemingly dangerous than the SF counterpart--dark, cars bashed in, gang activity). At least that was my sense.
I agree with your entire post except this paragraph. I don't think the UW area feels "run-down" at all - in fact, you have a world-class university within the city limits & the U-district is pretty awesome, for students & non-students alike, packed full of extremely cheap, diverse, solid restaurants (though none are amazing -- but they are surprisingly good for the price), record stores galore, vintage shops, & little knick-knacks. This goes on for many blocks on end. You don't have an area like that in the city of SF -- there are certain areas that have pieces of these here and there. Closest is Haight but it's different. (Although go across the bridge and you have Berkeley, which does have the same vibe as the U-dist. but is much bigger.)

You are correct about Belltown but that's just like present-day SOMA (minus the clubs.)

Capitol Hill, although not as exciting as the Mission District in SF, is nowhere near as blighted or dangerous as the Mission.
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Old 09-05-2010, 04:43 PM
 
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San Francisco is way too congested. There are way more beautiful places that are cheaper to live and you can enjoy it without stepping on other peoples feet. It is an okay City but Seattle and Boston much nicer.
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Old 09-05-2010, 07:12 PM
 
Location: West Coast Wanderer
12,411 posts, read 10,389,767 times
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Both cities are great places if you like the "northern city" culture and lifestyle but with milder weather than places like Chicago or Boston. To west coast standards, Seattle's winters are cold. If you're coming from the midwest or east coast, you may like either. However, as mentioned, Seattle tends to remain cloudy for extended periods of time. The summers in Seattle are definitely warmer most years. However, they are relatively short. I spent 5 days in Seattle in mid September and it was only cloudy a good part of the day (not all day) once.

San Francisco city proper is quite a unique place. It's not as clean as Seattle. In the Bay Area, Oakland and Berkeley are much more like Seattle than SF both in the way they look and to a good degree in culture and lifestyle.

The job market is better in the Bay Area but Seattle is no slouch when the economy is good. It has more than just Microsoft and Starbucks. Other companies such as Nordstrom, Costco. Amazon.com and Alaska Airlines have their headquarters there as well.

Both cities are well provided with lots of steep hills. Generally a little higher in SF.
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Old 09-05-2010, 07:28 PM
 
4,815 posts, read 5,469,116 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jpa2001 View Post
San Francisco is way too congested. There are way more beautiful places that are cheaper to live and you can enjoy it without stepping on other peoples feet. It is an okay City but Seattle and Boston much nicer.
I agree 100% rep points for you!
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Old 09-05-2010, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
2,970 posts, read 2,316,321 times
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Both cities are great and share a number of similarities (general mindset, politics, eco-friendliness, etc).

To me the main differences are pace and weather

Seattle is wayyyyy more laid back, slower, and mellow. Everyone drives and walks a lot slower. Not sure why this is but it's definitely noticeable. Seattle is also a lot cleaner.

SF is more bustling and hectic. It's not NYC, but it feels much more urban and on-the-go than Seattle. It's also more expensive, crowded, and dirty.

I love the Bay Area, but if I had to move anywhere on the West Coast, Seattle would be the first city I'd consider.
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