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Old 05-13-2009, 01:47 PM
 
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I seem to read an awful lot of posts both here and on other sites where there's a family who is relocating to another city, often from across country, and the very first thing they want to do, even before getting there is buy a house, most often in an area they've just read about and know little about.

That to me maskes zero sense. Part of what becoming a homeowner is all about is buying in a neighborhood you like, that ties you to the area, and puts a foundation under your family by immersing them in the community. Now why you would want to guess about this and Immediately move into a house without living in the area first makes no sense whatsoever- yet LOTS of people obviously do it. Is there some tangible reason why? What advantage is there to doing something like that?
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Old 05-13-2009, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Crafton via San Francisco
2,727 posts, read 1,884,295 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sliverbox View Post
I seem to read an awful lot of posts both here and on other sites where there's a family who is relocating to another city, often from across country, and the very first thing they want to do, even before getting there is buy a house, most often in an area they've just read about and know little about.

That to me maskes zero sense. Part of what becoming a homeowner is all about is buying in a neighborhood you like, that ties you to the area, and puts a foundation under your family by immersing them in the community. Now why you would want to guess about this and Immediately move into a house without living in the area first makes no sense whatsoever- yet LOTS of people obviously do it. Is there some tangible reason why? What advantage is there to doing something like that?
I agree. Doesn't make sense to me either. I'm planning to move to another state in about four years. I plan to rent for at least six months so I can get to know the area before I buy.
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Old 05-13-2009, 02:11 PM
 
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That seems very foolish to me. Some people have more money than sense.
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Old 05-13-2009, 03:46 PM
 
10,141 posts, read 14,904,073 times
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In some parts of the country there's a strong emphasis on home ownership, even for recent arrivals and for young people (we lived in one place where it was difficult even to find decent rentals - everything was either for old people or for those with very little money, and the few nice places in town had waiting lists); I'm guessing at least some of these people come from those backgrounds and it just doesn't cross their minds that renting is (a) perfectly socially acceptable for people of all classes, (b) prices are so crazy here that they could make a VERY costly mistake if they choose a neighborhood they hate, (c) they really want to buy, don't want to move twice, or maybe have kids that they don't want to uproot twice, and (d) well - don't know about d. For people with enough money or detailed real estate know-how maybe they can take the financial risk of getting the wrong place and figure that they'll still come out ahead. For most people, though, I agree that this is a very bad strategy. It takes time to get to know a place, and renting isn't the end of the world, even if it does potentially mean moving again after a year. I think if it was me, and if we had kids of school-age, we'd target the are we think we want to live in, would rent there within the school district boundaries, then eventually buy after we'd actually had a chance to see if expectations matched up with reality.
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Old 05-13-2009, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
50,029 posts, read 42,368,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sliverbox View Post
I seem to read an awful lot of posts both here and on other sites where there's a family who is relocating to another city, often from across country, and the very first thing they want to do, even before getting there is buy a house, most often in an area they've just read about and know little about.

That to me maskes zero sense. Part of what becoming a homeowner is all about is buying in a neighborhood you like, that ties you to the area, and puts a foundation under your family by immersing them in the community. Now why you would want to guess about this and Immediately move into a house without living in the area first makes no sense whatsoever- yet LOTS of people obviously do it. Is there some tangible reason why? What advantage is there to doing something like that?
There are a couple of reasons, 1-to keep from making more than one move, moves can be very costly and if kids are involved it could mean changing schools and 2-for many finding a decent rental is like pulling teeth, very painful and often not satisfying.

With proper research and a really good realtor most people can make a good decision..

This does not mean to purchase sight unseen, it means come prior to the actually re-location, spend a few days or a week investigating and deciding on what area fits your needs.

Nita
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Old 05-13-2009, 04:44 PM
 
Location: southern california
50,245 posts, read 47,554,186 times
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much easier buying them than selling them.
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Old 05-13-2009, 05:10 PM
 
2,060 posts, read 3,535,540 times
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Quote:
There are a couple of reasons, 1-to keep from making more than one move, moves can be very costly and if kids are involved it could mean changing schools and 2-for many finding a decent rental is like pulling teeth, very painful and often not satisfying.
Hogwash. I've moved no less than 6 times in the Bay Area and I moved twice on the East Coast. The truth is that even with a house full of stuff, moving takes me an average of one, perhaps two weekends, plus maybe a couple of weeks to settle in. I've found all of my rentals on craigslist and I typically have 5-10 choices between properties. If you have kids- then just rent in the area they are to go to school for a year and if you buy a house, wait until summertime.

Again- it seems totally ridiculous that people would make such a drastic life-altering decision without living there. No realtor is going to give you a clue what its like to live there and neither is the research.It takes at least a year to see how things are. A week is far from being long enough. Most of the reasons I hear people for giving the reason for not trying out an area first are miniscule problems that get blown out of proportion in comparison to the bigger problem- which would be buying a home in an area you ultimately don't like.
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Old 05-13-2009, 05:59 PM
 
1,231 posts, read 2,179,873 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sliverbox View Post
Hogwash.
I call partial hogwash on your hogwash. The last time we moved it cost over $5,000 for the movers alone and was a multi-day effort for them, and took us weeks to settle in. Not all moving situations are the same.

That said, if I was moving thousands of miles I'd rent first if possible, and since I own here in the Bay Area I'd be tempted to keep my home and rent it in the event I did not like where I moved to. I know more than a couple of people who moved out of the Bay Area, decided later they wanted back and could not then afford the move back into the housing market.
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Old 05-13-2009, 07:19 PM
 
14,199 posts, read 26,341,715 times
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Case can be made for both sides...

Recently, I had several inquiries by DM from people relocating to the Bay Area and wanting to buy... they were not having any luck finding a suitable rental with pets... one message was from someone with 2 Rottweilers

Sometimes, you almost have to own if you have pets... and then there are lots of postings about people that just get settled and learn the home is for sale or foreclosed...

No doubt about it... a single individual or even a couple has lots of options when it comes to renting...

A family with several school age children and pets... may be stuck if they are unwilling to change...
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Old 05-13-2009, 10:38 PM
 
495 posts, read 1,273,382 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
In some parts of the country there's a strong emphasis on home ownership.....
I think that's it. Most of my relatives are home owners in other parts of the country. Even my cousins in their 20's & 30's all own their own homes or some sort of property (condos etc). I'm an anomaly out here in the Bay Area. We are just used to renting and that's what people have to do because of the high cost of living. If I had been smarter in my 20's I could've bought something, but my priorities were elsewhere and I didn't know I was going to come back here.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sliverbox View Post
That to me maskes zero sense. Part of what becoming a homeowner is all about is buying in a neighborhood you like, that ties you to the area, and puts a foundation under your family by immersing them in the community. Now why you would want to guess about this and Immediately move into a house without living in the area first makes no sense whatsoever- yet LOTS of people obviously do it. Is there some tangible reason why? What advantage is there to doing something like that?
I personally don't see a problem with buying a house with a long-distance move if you've done your research, can afford to take the risk and are trusting your intuition. Now if you're going to b***h and moan about it after realizing you made a mistake and then bash the Bay Area because of it, now that's another thing. I sure do wish I could pick up and buy my dream house by the sea right now, that's for sure. Shoot.
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