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Old 05-08-2007, 12:38 PM
 
989 posts, read 3,951,420 times
Reputation: 770
Quote:
Originally Posted by sliverbox View Post
You might be surprised that " flyover land" has some of the fastest growing cities in the country. That and their average age is significantly younger than that of CA and NY. More like 25-30 somethings. It doesn't take a genius to figure out why this is happening. Could it be because many are kind of fed up with paying too much to live on the coasts?
.

Good point, you might be suprised at how statistically young Orange County is. (Especially young when compared to most of CA). Since most of the homes were built fairly recently, the average age is below mid-to-low thirty's in nearly every city. Places like RSM and H.B. have 50k,100k, 200k pops and counting while the median age remains at 34. How do these young people afford it condos for $500k and homes for $1 million? -I don't know..

The same phenomenom, you mention, is happening in places like Arizona, Colorado, and Texas. On the other hand, places like Florida are becoming more wrinkled than a nursing home.

Last edited by newportbeachsmostwanted; 05-08-2007 at 12:56 PM..
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Old 05-12-2007, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Burkina Faso
421 posts, read 152,722 times
Reputation: 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by sliverbox View Post
Indeed, the Midwest is lagging very far behind. These are those aforementioned rust belt states that formerly had economies heavily based in manufacturing. They have not made the transition towards a modern economy as well as other places.

The states with high numbers of new residents and overall economic, industrial growth include: TX, AZ, NC, GA, TN, AZ, and WA. The last 2 were inundated with CA ex-pats pretty heavily so they got pricey pretty quick. TX is simply massive and has lots of cities that in some ways at least topically have similarities to some major CA cities: Austin, Dallas, and Corpus Christi. NC has a robust tech economy these days in the tech triangle region: Raleigh,Durahm, and Chapel Hill. Atlanta gained more people per capita than any other major city. It gained close to 500,000 people in 5 years. It is also the youngest city in the US with the avg age somewhere around 25. The pattern with these places are that they are affordable, growing, less congested, and depending on how you look at it- more advantageous to business due to less economic and environmental restrictions along with less taxation. In fact many states now offer tax incentives to companies willing to relocate there.

I suppose the point I was trying to make is that despite having healthy economies, the more traditional areas in the east and west coasts are losing many bright minds and future families for a totally different set of circumstances, which is the fact that they no longer easily provide the "american dream" while other areas do. Unless the coasts can somehow end the cycle of rampant booms and busts, I don't see this shift changing.

It is in California's best interest to encourage affordability.
Don't congratulate yourself too much. The Midwest actually does fairly well for itself - better than the Northeast, though the metros around Lake Erie continue to stagnate.

How much of the growth in the Southwest (and now also in the Southeast) is being driven by an absolutely gigantic amount of illegal immigration from Mexico? Quite frankly, you can have the population growth.
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Old 05-12-2007, 08:38 PM
 
Location: McKinleyville, California
4,868 posts, read 5,019,107 times
Reputation: 2725
Default Moving out of the bay area

In 1991 I lived in Berkeley and had nine yards in the upper Broadway Terrace area that I maintained. That is till the Oakland/Berkeley hills fire in October. I lost all nine yards and overnight I was unemployed and going on 32 years old. A friend of mine owned property in Humboldt county in the Garberville area and offered me the opportunity to try living in the woods the old fashioned way. I did that four seven years and got the chance to buy a 3 bedroom, 3 bath home on almost a half an acre for $115,000 in 2000. Now in 2007 the place is worth over $300,000 with the addition of a 2 car garage and other home improvements. That is about average for a typical single family home here in McKinleyville, 12 miles north of Eureka California. McK is an unincorporated community of close to 15,000 and growing, with a large big-K, a Safeway complex,a Rays foodmart, 2 hardware stores, a feedstore, 18 plus eating establishments, 6 gas stations and a nine-plex theatre. Homes with an ocean view and even a short walk to the beach may go for as low as $255,000 for a small home and to the $700-800,000 range for an executive mansion in a gated community nearly on the beach. The town has grown in leaps and bounds over the last ten years. We have and airport called the Eureka/Arcata airport, yet is in Mck. Arcata is a state university town that is much like Berkeley in culture and attitude and is around 17,000 people. Right now the Humboldt bay region is great for retirement or construction jobs due to the large amount of home growth here. Most of the local long time citizens can no longer afford to buy a home here, it is down to 12% of the locals can afford to. I am a gardener and someone is always in need of one, so I am seldom without work. Google Eureka, Arcata, McKinleyville, Fortuna and Ferndale in Humboldt county and be surprised at how few people there are up here, totol county population in around 130,000 and Eureka is the largest town and county seat with just over 28,000 people. The weather is much the same as Berkeley, Richmond and San Fransisco. Inland 5 miles it can get in the 90's and 100's in the summer. I have family in Vacaville and Pittsburg and visit a few times a year. I always look forward to returning home where there is no rush hour traffic, smog or crowds. The highway is always clear and moving fast. If one loves victorians , then Ferndale is a joy to partake of, the whole town is a historic victorian village. Eureka has many beautiful victorians amidst it's vast array of architecture styles. Take a trip up here to see the Eel river and the large redwood trees and you will see why I love it here. It is only 350 miles north and the drive is a breeze once your'e past Santa Rosa.

Martin
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Old 05-17-2007, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Oakand, CA
8 posts, read 29,215 times
Reputation: 13
I have several friends who have moved out of the Bay Area into the central valley...about half of them want to move back, but now can't afford to.

Once you leave, its really tough to return.
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Old 05-17-2007, 03:35 PM
 
2,062 posts, read 3,290,926 times
Reputation: 1370
The question would why did they do a half-ass job of moving in the first place? The Central valley is kind of a dump. Would've been better if they'd gone to TX, NC, or GA instead of the Central Valley... like Manteca. But.. It IS in California isn't it?
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Old 05-18-2007, 12:17 PM
 
351 posts, read 763,236 times
Reputation: 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Boy View Post
I moved to Atlanta several years ago and am Back here. Atlanta is boring as with most places in the south and Midwest IMO. Unless you want to go to night clubs every single night. What is there to do? Nothing. I'm sure most of these people fleeing these area's will end up back in them after realizing the places they think are cheaper are cheap for a reason. Not to mention you're salary will go down dramatically in another area because the cost of living is lower. I'd rather pay more and enjoy what california has to offer than be able to buy a huge house and be bored to death.
I am starting to believe that myself. You could go to these places AND get a big house and be with people who are 30 years behind in their ways and their thinking. There is so much more to life than a big house...at least for me. I want some culture and I want people who are progressive in thought. All due respect...great house in Atlanta, lots of yard....but jeez the backward ass thinking people! LAWD!
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Old 05-18-2007, 03:36 PM
 
2,062 posts, read 3,290,926 times
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I am starting to believe that myself. You could go to these places AND get a big house and be with people who are 30 years behind in their ways and their thinking. There is so much more to life than a big house...at least for me. I want some culture and I want people who are progressive in thought. All due respect...great house in Atlanta, lots of yard....but jeez the backward ass thinking people! LAWD!

let me tell you something. I'm a native Southerner with family roots dating back 200+ years in the area. Guess what? 2 of my family members are gay, and we're FINE with it. We have friends from all over the world. My dad's best friend is Greek. My parents both travel all over the country and world for that matter. One of the best Vietnamese restaurants I've ever eaten at is 10 minutes down the road from them. Art classes are offered at the university for FREE. The area actually has a regional musical type. I can't say the same for SF... can you? The national parks are often free and seldom crowded with people. Unlike Yosemite, you can drive to and from the Appalachians in a day, take a 15 mile hike, stop at a local BBQ joint, eat a picnic lunch, and go home in the same day. No reservations or $20 entrance fees. lastly- people are genuinely NICE to one another, and when they say " have a nice day", the MEAN it.

Yes- there is MORE to life than a big house and a yard. But if that's seriously all you found there, then perhaps the problem isn't with the area, but maybe your attitude towards it. Yes. SF welcomes you back with open arms.

You people who spew all the 'progressive' bull crap yet don't follow your own medicine are a piece of work.
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Old 05-18-2007, 04:24 PM
 
539 posts, read 1,240,057 times
Reputation: 184
Silverbox-you just made my day! I see this all too often here in Connecticut.
Here its "I'm liberal...just as long as it doesnt affect me".
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Old 05-21-2007, 01:43 AM
 
23 posts, read 123,023 times
Reputation: 21
my family and I are planning to move to Las Vegas. housing is considerably cheaper than the bay area and so is practically everything else except for utilities. The jobs dont pay as well, but hey, its Vegas! The only thing i really have to say about this subject is that if you think about it, we (people from the bay area) shouldn't complain about the cost of living here. i mean yeah, everything here is expensive (i should say overpriced) but if you have a job here, you aren't going to find better pay anywhere else doing the same thing. we have the highest minimum wage in the nation for crying out loud.
chew on this for a minute: here's a great quote from my friend's dad, he works for KGO, a news radio station here in San Francisco.
he says that if you live and work in the Bay Area, the 30,000 dollar BMW you want to buy is going to cost the same no matter where you go. But no matter where you go, you wont get paid enough to buy that 30,000 BMW unless you live and work in the Bay Area.
a nice little play of words, but if you think about the quote, it makes sense.
i mean really, if you have a job in the Bay Area flipping burgers (dare i say real estate?), do you really think you will get paid more, in some other state, for doing the same thing? i didn't think so.
but hey, thats just my opinion (even though it does make sense lol)
and besides, im moving to vegas anyway. Sin City baby. i think that constitutes one "enough said."
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Old 05-21-2007, 08:43 AM
 
2,062 posts, read 3,290,926 times
Reputation: 1370
we (people from the bay area) shouldn't complain about the cost of living here. i mean yeah, everything here is expensive (i should say overpriced) but if you have a job here, you aren't going to find better pay anywhere else doing the same thing. we have the highest minimum wage in the nation for crying out loud.

This is a classic counterpoint that has been used for decades in referral to the BA versus other areas. As I've mentioned a number of times, all anyone who wants to find the real differences is to go to the bls.gov site- Bureau of Labor Statistics- and check to see what the avg pay per occupation is in any given region, then compare that to SF and the BA.

In many cases, you'll likely find that while the pay in the BA might be higher than most, it won't be drastic- on average around 20-30% more. This makes the argument that the Bay Area costs more, but is compensated by higher wages seem on the surface reasonable and logical, but what isn't considered is that the cost of living in the Bay Area if you were to compare two identical families living modest middle class style lives. The middle class family living in say- GA will be paying roughly 3.5-4 times less to enjoy the same lifestyle as the person in SF. Even this estimate is heavily off balance because the cost of housing has gone up so much that a typical middle class house in GA might as well be a upper class level home here.

So if a salary in SF pays say- 60k, the same job pays 40k in GA. Monetarily, the differences seem severe. Translating this income into what it will afford you in these two areas is a totally different equation alltogether.
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