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Old 01-06-2013, 04:18 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattk92681 View Post
Walnut Creek, Pleasanton, Livermore, San Ramon
Actually, the inland parts of the Bay Area are cloudier than the coast in winter, although not by a wide margin.
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Old 01-06-2013, 04:24 AM
 
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[quote=hsa;27637567And anyone who tells you that San Jose is 70-75 during the winter is misleading you. Check out the *record* temps - in January, those are mostly around 70 degrees. Not the average, mind you, but the record highs.[/quote]

I don't think anyone said that SJ was normally 70 in January. Another poster said 90% of the days are sunny in SJ, but that is an exaggeration. 90% of they days from May to October may be sunny, but not the rest of the year. December & January, in particular, can be dreary and chilly (as you've noted).

But once February comes, afternoon high temps in SJ usually hit 60 on a pretty regular basis. The number of rainy days dips significantly by March. So it's really only 2 months out of the year that are crappy (at least in most years)...at least for me.
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Old 01-06-2013, 05:54 PM
 
Location: San Jose, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hsa View Post
I find the winters chilly, somewhat dreary and barely tolerable. I didn't love winter in SoCal, but I despise it here and don't like going outside. Is it better than NE? Of course, but I still don't like it.
If even the Socal winter isn't good enough, than what is? Surely not the Peninsula, but you're putting up with it for some good reason, yes?
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Old 01-16-2013, 10:40 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
I don't think anyone said that SJ was normally 70 in January. Another poster said 90% of the days are sunny in SJ, but that is an exaggeration. 90% of they days from May to October may be sunny, but not the rest of the year. December & January, in particular, can be dreary and chilly (as you've noted).

But once February comes, afternoon high temps in SJ usually hit 60 on a pretty regular basis. The number of rainy days dips significantly by March. So it's really only 2 months out of the year that are crappy (at least in most years)...at least for me.

I agree with mysticaltiger above. It's just two months that can get really dreary (although so far, the last three weeks have been pretty much clear and sunny almost every day, albeit chilly, but this weekend is looking much warmer).

For anyone who can't handle either San Jose's or SoCal's winter weather, I can only think of Honolulu or Phoenix as alternatives. We got it pretty good here all in all.
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Old 01-17-2013, 09:59 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
Heat, long dry periods and arid terrain screws with me big time.
I actually like some arid terrain, but it depends on the type. True desert terrain that's permanently arid, including Joshua Tree Monument, the Coachella Valley, the Phoenix Area, Vegas, or Reno, can be really beautiful and very architectural. The problem with San Diego's terrain is that, like the Bay Area, it's only seasonally arid, but San Diego's landscape doesn't look good during the dry season. Here in the Bay Area, I think it's the opposite, with the local landscape actually looking better during the dry season.

San Diego is coastal and moist enough to sustain a fairly thick carpet of brush and chaparral, but when the dry season hits, those shrubs all lose their leaves and turn gray. When the winter rains refresh it, the hills do get nice and green, the wildflowers come out, and it's beautiful for a short while. But then it all turns kind of ugly again for the summer. You basically look at twigs for months.

I think the Bay Area has the opposite aesthetic predicament. For example, Mt. Diablo's untouched foothills and surrounds are covered in a carpet of seasonal grass, lightly dotted with oak trees, and patches of chaparral here and there. In the winter, the grass turns lush and green, but many of the trees have no leaves (there are some evergreen oaks), and it just sort of looks like anywhere, certainly not special in any way. Come May, the grass dries to a beautiful light tan, and the oak trees will look like sheep dotting the landscape. Against the blue sky, those golden hills look like classic, Steinbeckian California pulled straight out of a novel. There's a certain western romance to it, and it makes you want to ride a horse. (And the many horse riders out there only add to the romance).

I think you live in Oakland? What I sort of lament is the way the Oakland/Berkeley hills, at least the visible portions facing the Bay, have been changed into an artificial forest. So many houses, so many random trees people have planted over decades -- it all doesn't look like California anymore. It starts looking much more uniquely Californian as you travel south on 880 and get into Union City and Fremont.
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Old 02-04-2013, 09:27 AM
 
Location: roaming gnome
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Originally Posted by tstieber View Post
Interesting point about terrain. I suppose that applies to anywhere, though, not just at a particular latitude. The latitude of San Jose (about 37 degrees north) is roughly the same as the south of Spain or Italy, and lemme tell ya, people in those countries don't talk about SAD. They always have a good time. I think Americans are more oversensitive to that stuff, and I think Americans spend much more time indoors and would benefit from more direct daylight. In fact, most of my relatives are in Germany, which is like 51+ degrees north, it's gloomy much of the winter, with short days, and they don't even experience SAD, because they're outside much more, even in the cold. So I think that's really key to avoiding SAD -- getting outside and not just driving to work and then leaving when it's dark. That can get depressing.
SF area is far more grey, drizzly and lush/greener than mediterranean cities like Rome, Barcelona, Madrid, Valencia, Naples, Athens, Tel Aviv etc. Those cities are chillier but more like SoCal in terms of sunlight. Your relatives just might not be SAD prone, not everybody gets it. Also, San Jose doesn't really represent most of the Bay Area. Go up to SF, Oakland, Marin, Sonoma and will be singing a different tune, esp on the west sides of the cities, or near the coast in Marin, Sonoma.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tstieber View Post
I just looked up LA vs SF, and LA gets 20 minutes more daylight than SF on the shortest day of the year (and SF gets 20 min more on the longest day of the year). Is that noticeable? Depends. SoCal gets those extra 20 minutes all on the sunrise end of the day, because its coastline curves so far in that the more eastern longitude actually affects the sunrise/sunset times too. So at the winter solstice, the sun actually sets later in SF than LA by about ten minutes, but then it rises about thirty minutes earlier in LA (giving LA a total of 20 minutes more). So it depends on if you're an early bird or not. I'm not, so the early sunrise is wasted on me. I get more use out of a later sunset, so to me, the days feel shorter in SoCal because I don't make use of the sunrise.
You aren't considering cloud cover. I think your stats are based on . For people with SAD, I would definitely be picky on where I lived in the Bay Area due to the microclimates. Its the cloud cover more than the cold that is the problem. Relatively few people in Colorado have SAD, where it's overwhelming say in Oregon. Depending on where your residence is, it can be super overcast in the winter in Bay Area. Especially if you work a 9-5 job where the sun might only break every other day around noon-4 oclock.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tstieber View Post
True, but then again, that can happen pretty much anywhere. Florida, the "sunshine state," can get tons and tons of rain, and I've been in SoCal during some recent summers where it was just socked in with fog and low clouds for months during the spring and summer.

I think the only truly dependable areas for high sunshine are the actual deserts, but overall, California tends to be very sunny most of the year, most years. And if we get a fluke bad year, we'll take that trip to Hawaii that year! :-)
Florida is far sunnier, warmer, and at much lower latitude in the winter though than the Bay Area when SAD rears it's ugly head, not even close. Certainly many parts of the Bay Area could induce mild SAD for those that suffer from it, so for the OP I would definitely be skeptical on where you chose your residence.

Last edited by grapico; 02-04-2013 at 09:44 AM..
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Old 02-10-2013, 12:56 PM
 
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I agree with almost all of your additional notes, except for the idea that SF would be greyer, wetter, or greener than most of those cities (Tel Aviv being the exception). SF and the entire Bay Area are squarely classified as a Mediterranean climate by virtue of the long dry season, so our local landscape turns green in winter and brown in summer -- just the same as the Mediterranean basin. But if you look up climate data for some of these cities, you'll see Rome, Barcelona, and Naples are colder than SF in winter, and receive more rain year round (Naples gets almost twice as much rain), plus they're at a higher latitude which means even lower sun angles in winter. Madrid is a smidge drier (more like Sacramento) but even colder in winter, and still farther north. Athens has comparable temps and latitude but is a tiny bit drier (not much). Tel Aviv is MUCH wetter, but about five degrees warmer in winter, and farther south in latitutde. I think you just haven't been to the Mediterranean in the winter -- it's really almost worse that here. In any case, this winter is so sunny that I'm almost getting antsy from the lack of variety...

Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
SF area is far more grey, drizzly and lush/greener than mediterranean cities like Rome, Barcelona, Madrid, Valencia, Naples, Athens, Tel Aviv etc. Those cities are chillier but more like SoCal in terms of sunlight. Your relatives just might not be SAD prone, not everybody gets it. Also, San Jose doesn't really represent most of the Bay Area. Go up to SF, Oakland, Marin, Sonoma and will be singing a different tune, esp on the west sides of the cities, or near the coast in Marin, Sonoma.



You aren't considering cloud cover. I think your stats are based on . For people with SAD, I would definitely be picky on where I lived in the Bay Area due to the microclimates. Its the cloud cover more than the cold that is the problem. Relatively few people in Colorado have SAD, where it's overwhelming say in Oregon. Depending on where your residence is, it can be super overcast in the winter in Bay Area. Especially if you work a 9-5 job where the sun might only break every other day around noon-4 oclock.



Florida is far sunnier, warmer, and at much lower latitude in the winter though than the Bay Area when SAD rears it's ugly head, not even close. Certainly many parts of the Bay Area could induce mild SAD for those that suffer from it, so for the OP I would definitely be skeptical on where you chose your residence.
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