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Old 01-11-2013, 01:40 PM
 
Location: San Jose, CA
7,228 posts, read 5,735,939 times
Reputation: 4237
Quote:
Originally Posted by marcopolo666 View Post
Of course, it also makes the kid "different" from everybody else.
Making a kid go to a private fundamentalist indoctrination school makes them "different' as well. About as well-rounded as being prevented from attending class with anybody of the opposite gender, race, or class.

Save the money and allow the kids to interact with (aack!) people not exactly like themselves.
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Old 01-11-2013, 05:57 PM
 
15 posts, read 11,828 times
Reputation: 11
Public schools have the advantage of having all the students living in the same neighborhood, vs private schools where everyone is scattered all over town or county.
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Old 01-11-2013, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Upper East, NY
1,144 posts, read 1,173,325 times
Reputation: 519
if your kid is gifted, private school is worth it before high school because public school is just too easy
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Old 01-12-2013, 03:45 PM
 
Location: San Jose, CA
7,228 posts, read 5,735,939 times
Reputation: 4237
Quote:
Originally Posted by crescent22 View Post
if your kid is gifted, private school is worth it before high school because public school is just too easy
Not if they offer a decent range of AP and Honors classes.
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Old 01-12-2013, 07:49 PM
Status: "orgasmic" (set 19 days ago)
 
464 posts, read 334,621 times
Reputation: 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdumbgod View Post
Not if they offer a decent range of AP and Honors classes.
The person said "before high school". I've never seen a pre-high school offer AP classes. *MAYBE* they exist, but they must be pretty rare if they do.
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Old 01-12-2013, 07:51 PM
Status: "orgasmic" (set 19 days ago)
 
464 posts, read 334,621 times
Reputation: 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdumbgod View Post
Making a kid go to a private fundamentalist indoctrination school makes them "different' as well. About as well-rounded as being prevented from attending class with anybody of the opposite gender, race, or class.

Save the money and allow the kids to interact with (aack!) people not exactly like themselves.
I didn't express myself well. I meant it would make the kid "different" from his classmates (the only, or one of the few, that doesn't have to sit through religion classes). Being singled out from your classmates can be a difficult thing for young kids, socially.
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Old 01-13-2013, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Paranoid State
2,600 posts, read 2,079,133 times
Reputation: 2038
We started our daughter in a well regarded local elementary school (Regnart in Cupertino). Our experience was that even good public schools teach to a "one-size-fits-nobody" approach. Both my wife and I had full-time professional careers which made before-school and after-school logistics and inclusion in activities VERY challenging.

Beginning 2nd grade we switched to private (Harker). One of the things we really appreciated was that both before-school and after-school activities and supervision were included. Another was the broad curriculum including fine arts, and also that at an early age they offered multiple levels of core subjects so a kid could be in "high" math but "regular" English, for example - as early as 2nd grade.

Our daughter is a senior at Columbia in NYC now, and her Harker elementary education prepared her very well. I've lost track but a few years ago Harker had something liike 11% or maybe 15% of there graduating senior class enroll at MIT as freshmen. My point is their student body is definitely from the deep end of the gene pool.

*******

At the end of the day, there are only a handful of things we as parents can do to materially effect how our children grow up. Perhaps most important among these is choice of schools - but not for test scores.

When we as parents choose a school for our kids, we are in effect choosing the population from which our kids will select friends and determine their peers. I can't stress enough how important that is.

When our daughter was ready for high school I looked at her maybe returning to the public school system. I interviewed the principal at our local high school (Monta Vista) and asked him in essence what his secret sauce was for student success. If we were to swap student bodies with, say, a low-performing high school on the the east side, how would the students perform, I asked.

His answer was telling. "It's all about the parents and the kids peer groups and related peer pressure. Our student body has a large 1st generation American population (mainly from China and India). Mom & Dad tend each to be engineers or scientists with advanced degrees, and Grandma might live at home, and English is not necessarily spoken inside the house. The family emphasis is on education. "

"Across the valley," he continued, "the high schools also have student bodies with a large 1st generation American population (mainly from Mexico and Central America ). Mom & Dad both work long hours, and Grandma might live at home, and English is not necessarily spoken inside the house. Their emphasis is not necessarily on higher education, and the kids don't perform as well. "

"If we were to swap student bodies, the local Cupertino kids would fare just as well in the east-side school, and the students from the east-side would fare no better at Monta Vista. It is all about the families and peers."
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Old 01-13-2013, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Upper East, NY
1,144 posts, read 1,173,325 times
Reputation: 519
the comment about public school being too easy was meant to encompass not just the difficulty or challenge of the curriculum but the culture that pervades around all the students and how it affects their motivation.

I went to public school in Silicon Valley, a pretty decent high school. It took me until I was 30 to realize it would have been better to go to private school
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Old 01-13-2013, 08:11 PM
 
562 posts, read 273,846 times
Reputation: 329
Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
We started our daughter in a well regarded local elementary school (Regnart in Cupertino). Our experience was that even good public schools teach to a "one-size-fits-nobody" approach. Both my wife and I had full-time professional careers which made before-school and after-school logistics and inclusion in activities VERY challenging.

Beginning 2nd grade we switched to private (Harker). One of the things we really appreciated was that both before-school and after-school activities and supervision were included. Another was the broad curriculum including fine arts, and also that at an early age they offered multiple levels of core subjects so a kid could be in "high" math but "regular" English, for example - as early as 2nd grade.

Our daughter is a senior at Columbia in NYC now, and her Harker elementary education prepared her very well. I've lost track but a few years ago Harker had something liike 11% or maybe 15% of there graduating senior class enroll at MIT as freshmen. My point is their student body is definitely from the deep end of the gene pool.

*******

At the end of the day, there are only a handful of things we as parents can do to materially effect how our children grow up. Perhaps most important among these is choice of schools - but not for test scores.

When we as parents choose a school for our kids, we are in effect choosing the population from which our kids will select friends and determine their peers. I can't stress enough how important that is.

When our daughter was ready for high school I looked at her maybe returning to the public school system. I interviewed the principal at our local high school (Monta Vista) and asked him in essence what his secret sauce was for student success. If we were to swap student bodies with, say, a low-performing high school on the the east side, how would the students perform, I asked.

His answer was telling. "It's all about the parents and the kids peer groups and related peer pressure. Our student body has a large 1st generation American population (mainly from China and India). Mom & Dad tend each to be engineers or scientists with advanced degrees, and Grandma might live at home, and English is not necessarily spoken inside the house. The family emphasis is on education. "

"Across the valley," he continued, "the high schools also have student bodies with a large 1st generation American population (mainly from Mexico and Central America ). Mom & Dad both work long hours, and Grandma might live at home, and English is not necessarily spoken inside the house. Their emphasis is not necessarily on higher education, and the kids don't perform as well. "

"If we were to swap student bodies, the local Cupertino kids would fare just as well in the east-side school, and the students from the east-side would fare no better at Monta Vista. It is all about the families and peers."
It seems like that should have given you a reason to have your child return to the public system (cause it's free). And yet you didn't. Why was that?
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Old 01-13-2013, 09:45 PM
 
Location: San Jose, CA
7,228 posts, read 5,735,939 times
Reputation: 4237
Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
*******


His answer was telling. "It's all about the parents and the kids peer groups and related peer pressure. Our student body has a large 1st generation American population (mainly from China and India). Mom & Dad tend each to be engineers or scientists with advanced degrees, and Grandma might live at home, and English is not necessarily spoken inside the house. The family emphasis is on education. "

"Across the valley," he continued, "the high schools also have student bodies with a large 1st generation American population (mainly from Mexico and Central America ). Mom & Dad both work long hours, and Grandma might live at home, and English is not necessarily spoken inside the house. Their emphasis is not necessarily on higher education, and the kids don't perform as well. "

"If we were to swap student bodies, the local Cupertino kids would fare just as well in the east-side school, and the students from the east-side would fare no better at Monta Vista. It is all about the families and peers."
It sounds like we're talking about two places with thoroughly homogeneous student populations. Wouldn't we rather choose a school that features not only high performance and arts, but also a diverse student body? Interacting with peers of varied persuasions prepares kids for the real world as well as any curriculum.
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