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Old 02-06-2013, 06:41 PM
 
41 posts, read 34,675 times
Reputation: 25
Default Truth about West San Jose

I've lived here my whole life (I'm in my 30's), fortunately my single mom made good money and was able to buy a house in the West San Jose/ Cupertino / Saratoga area.. There is virtually no crime, and the schools are the best in the area. The down side to this area in my opinion, is this:

When I was growing up we knew all the neighbors, they would stop and ask how your day was, plan block parties, kids all played together etc.. It was great.. over the years it has changed DRAMATICALLY..

With the Silicon Valley blowing up with Tech jobs/Internet start ups and endless engineering jobs, MANY people have moved here and cleared out the blue collar workers. This drove all the rental rates sky high and cost of homes are insane.. Not to mention shopping centers and malls being stripped down and changed to different languages mainly Asian decent and Indian. I'm all for divercity but this feels more like an invasion. I am now a minority in my own backyard...

Currently, I don't know any of my neighbors, they keep to themselves, don't socialize much, which I guess is a cultural thing? I don't really like it here anymore. The weather is great, and there is always something to do and its close to beaches, hiking, SF and etc.. My mom bought her house for 700,000 10 years ago a simple 3 bed 2 bath 1500 sq ft house.. Being a single mother she had a good job making over 110k a year and has been able to live comfortably.. (middle class) You can live here comfortably if you make 6 figures..

I guess that's my 2 cents... Any questions I'd be happy to answer!
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Old 02-06-2013, 09:12 PM
 
13,713 posts, read 11,162,842 times
Reputation: 9587
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mariarox76 View Post
I've lived here my whole life (I'm in my 30's), fortunately my single mom made good money and was able to buy a house in the West San Jose/ Cupertino / Saratoga area.. There is virtually no crime, and the schools are the best in the area. The down side to this area in my opinion, is this:

When I was growing up we knew all the neighbors, they would stop and ask how your day was, plan block parties, kids all played together etc.. It was great.. over the years it has changed DRAMATICALLY..

With the Silicon Valley blowing up with Tech jobs/Internet start ups and endless engineering jobs, MANY people have moved here and cleared out the blue collar workers. This drove all the rental rates sky high and cost of homes are insane.. Not to mention shopping centers and malls being stripped down and changed to different languages mainly Asian decent and Indian. I'm all for diversity but this feels more like an invasion. I am now a minority in my own backyard...

Currently, I don't know any of my neighbors, they keep to themselves, don't socialize much, which I guess is a cultural thing? I don't really like it here anymore. The weather is great, and there is always something to do and its close to beaches, hiking, SF and etc.. My mom bought her house for 700,000 10 years ago a simple 3 bed 2 bath 1500 sq ft house.. Being a single mother she had a good job making over 110k a year and has been able to live comfortably.. (middle class) You can live here comfortably if you make 6 figures..

I guess that's my 2 cents... Any questions I'd be happy to answer!
It's all been said before.

As far as immigrants keeping to themselves....They keep to themselves for the same reason you don't like having too many of them in your neighborhood. Their customs and lifestyle are different from yours. People like to be around the familiar. What you don't like about them is actually something you don't like about yourself as well.
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Old 02-06-2013, 10:05 PM
 
Location: San Jose, CA
7,325 posts, read 6,045,659 times
Reputation: 4373
Residents from bygone decades in the area being addressed are sometimes moving to places like Campbell and south San Jose, as they increasingly feel displaced by wealth and different cultures.

Downside: Gentrified out of your old neighborhood

Upside: Your west valley home is worth a lot, and you can sell it and buy another not far away for less and have money in the bank.


Progress and change happens. It's up to oneself to make the best of it.
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Old 02-06-2013, 10:10 PM
 
6,808 posts, read 1,044,615 times
Reputation: 1911
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mariarox76 View Post
Currently, I don't know any of my neighbors, they keep to themselves, don't socialize much, which I guess is a cultural thing? I don't really like it here anymore.

I guess that's my 2 cents... Any questions I'd be happy to answer!
Saying "Hi" hasn't worked for you? Typically does for me in every neighborhood I moved into statewide.
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Old 02-07-2013, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
2,410 posts, read 3,990,238 times
Reputation: 1336
Quote:
Originally Posted by Senno View Post
Saying "Hi" hasn't worked for you? Typically does for me in every neighborhood I moved into statewide.
I'm not social at all, but in the brief time (measured in days) that I've lived in my new neighborhood in San Jose, I've talked at length with the Chinese Ph.D. next door, the German housewife on the other side, and the Indian engineer who lives next to her (he stopped by while I was working in the garage). All were very friendly and welcoming.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mariarox76 View Post
Currently, I don't know any of my neighbors, they keep to themselves, don't socialize much, which I guess is a cultural thing?
They just don't like you. They probably throw parties where everyone in the neighborhood is invited except you.

Quote:
I don't really like it here anymore.
We can't wait for you to leave.
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Old 02-08-2013, 07:10 AM
 
1,030 posts, read 1,461,888 times
Reputation: 756
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
As far as immigrants keeping to themselves....They keep to themselves for the same reason you don't like having too many of them in your neighborhood. Their customs and lifestyle are different from yours. People like to be around the familiar. What you don't like about them is actually something you don't like about yourself as well.
Well, obviously this is a generalization, since there are exceptions. However, I would have to agree in general with the OP. Sure, it is easier to be around those that are familiar, but there is no effort whatsoever to assimilate by most. I've found times when I've said hi and was ignored. I have had plenty of experiences in befriending Chinese or Indians at work or when I was in school. However, many of them here just don't seem to want to become more Americanized.
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Old 02-09-2013, 12:56 AM
 
41 posts, read 34,675 times
Reputation: 25
Thank you! Roadwarrior..

My original post, wasn't to **** anyone off or get defensive about it. I'm just speaking about my experiences and my truth. I've lived here 37 years. I've seen people come and go, houses demolished so mansions can be built, friendly neighbors lose their homes and have to leave the area. I've seen shopping centers and small family owned business being demolished so that rich foreigners can build their stores that aren't even in English.. I'm all for diversity..I respect and enjoy ethnic cultures and food. What I don't enjoy or appreciate is how respect for America and English has diminished especially where I live... I can't imagine moving my family to another country, demolish one of their strip malls and build something American with only English menus and signs.. I feel that would be SO disrespectful of me to their country...

Quote:
Originally Posted by roadwarrior101 View Post
Well, obviously this is a generalization, since there are exceptions. However, I would have to agree in general with the OP. Sure, it is easier to be around those that are familiar, but there is no effort whatsoever to assimilate by most. I've found times when I've said hi and was ignored. I have had plenty of experiences in befriending Chinese or Indians at work or when I was in school. However, many of them here just don't seem to want to become more Americanized.
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Old 02-09-2013, 10:34 AM
 
159 posts, read 230,464 times
Reputation: 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mariarox76 View Post
Thank you! Roadwarrior..

My original post, wasn't to **** anyone off or get defensive about it. I'm just speaking about my experiences and my truth. I've lived here 37 years. I've seen people come and go, houses demolished so mansions can be built, friendly neighbors lose their homes and have to leave the area. I've seen shopping centers and small family owned business being demolished so that rich foreigners can build their stores that aren't even in English.. I'm all for diversity..I respect and enjoy ethnic cultures and food. What I don't enjoy or appreciate is how respect for America and English has diminished especially where I live... I can't imagine moving my family to another country, demolish one of their strip malls and build something American with only English menus and signs.. I feel that would be SO disrespectful of me to their country...
OP, I'm sorry you feel this way. I was born overseas (maybe in one of those countries from which those rich foreigners you are speaking of came from) but came to the United States at a young age. We did not settle in California at first, but rather a smallish "All-American" type town. We had no choice but to learn and speak English very quickly. And it was a community just as you describe. When we moved in there were many folks that were welcoming and friendly. It was a community we could leave the doors unlocked. And it was almost unheard of for me to go a day without complete strangers saying hello, people holding doors open for others, etc. It was a wonderful town/ community. I have not been back in years but I wonder if it's still like this. I hope so.

I personally do not believe that all the things you mention can be pinned on "foreigners". I noticed that when I moved to a larger city (and San Jose definitely counts) people were just less friendly in general. It also seems like a generational thing. I feel like as someone in my early 30s, I can somewhat criticize those of my generation and younger as being maybe a little less friendly and respectful of those "common courtesies" that I saw when I was a child. People of my generation that have money seem to be even worse in this regard. So what you are experiencing in your neighborhood may be influenced more by a generational change along with the infusion of wealth you describe.

The other issue you describe is, I believe, a symptom of a much larger phenomenon- Globalization. I could understand how or why it could feel like an invasion to you. I'll be honest. Even when I drive around and see blocks of stores with signs in foreign languages, I do feel a bit mixed and uncomfortable (even if that language happens to be my own "native" language!).

But at the same time, I hope you realize and understand the reach of American cultural and military imperialism in those very countries those "foreigners" came from. That coupled with capitalism (a strong American export) has changed very much how those countries look as well. Just take a walk down a street in any large city in a country like Japan, Korea, China, Vietnam, or India. It is littered with McDonald's, KFC, Starbucks, Pizza Hut, etc. Signs in English. The youths of these countries LOVE American culture. The music, the movies, the celebrities, etc. People can shop at Wal-Mart or Costco.

So as you can see, these things go both ways. And despite the issue of "globalization" being made into a dirty word by the politics of these times, there is not a single one of us here that does not somehow benefit from globalization. Some benefit much more, yes. But ultimately we are all better off.

I definitely do empathize with you and how you feel about the changing environment in your community. And I don't necessarily agree with any of those people that might just tell you to "move". You've lived there 40 years, it's YOUR community, why should you have to move? But ultimately I hope you find some peace with the fact that the community also belongs to the new people that are moving in as well. IT belongs to them just as much as it belongs to you, and hopefully you can play a part in showing some of those folks the "American" way, which I believe to be is a welcoming, friendly, and respectful ethos to people of all backgrounds.
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Old 02-09-2013, 03:23 PM
 
630 posts, read 381,704 times
Reputation: 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by thechoson View Post
OP, I'm sorry you feel this way. I was born overseas (maybe in one of those countries from which those rich foreigners you are speaking of came from) but came to the United States at a young age. We did not settle in California at first, but rather a smallish "All-American" type town. We had no choice but to learn and speak English very quickly. And it was a community just as you describe. When we moved in there were many folks that were welcoming and friendly. It was a community we could leave the doors unlocked. And it was almost unheard of for me to go a day without complete strangers saying hello, people holding doors open for others, etc. It was a wonderful town/ community. I have not been back in years but I wonder if it's still like this. I hope so.

I personally do not believe that all the things you mention can be pinned on "foreigners". I noticed that when I moved to a larger city (and San Jose definitely counts) people were just less friendly in general. It also seems like a generational thing. I feel like as someone in my early 30s, I can somewhat criticize those of my generation and younger as being maybe a little less friendly and respectful of those "common courtesies" that I saw when I was a child. People of my generation that have money seem to be even worse in this regard. So what you are experiencing in your neighborhood may be influenced more by a generational change along with the infusion of wealth you describe.

The other issue you describe is, I believe, a symptom of a much larger phenomenon- Globalization. I could understand how or why it could feel like an invasion to you. I'll be honest. Even when I drive around and see blocks of stores with signs in foreign languages, I do feel a bit mixed and uncomfortable (even if that language happens to be my own "native" language!).

But at the same time, I hope you realize and understand the reach of American cultural and military imperialism in those very countries those "foreigners" came from. That coupled with capitalism (a strong American export) has changed very much how those countries look as well. Just take a walk down a street in any large city in a country like Japan, Korea, China, Vietnam, or India. It is littered with McDonald's, KFC, Starbucks, Pizza Hut, etc. Signs in English. The youths of these countries LOVE American culture. The music, the movies, the celebrities, etc. People can shop at Wal-Mart or Costco.

So as you can see, these things go both ways. And despite the issue of "globalization" being made into a dirty word by the politics of these times, there is not a single one of us here that does not somehow benefit from globalization. Some benefit much more, yes. But ultimately we are all better off.

I definitely do empathize with you and how you feel about the changing environment in your community. And I don't necessarily agree with any of those people that might just tell you to "move". You've lived there 40 years, it's YOUR community, why should you have to move? But ultimately I hope you find some peace with the fact that the community also belongs to the new people that are moving in as well. IT belongs to them just as much as it belongs to you, and hopefully you can play a part in showing some of those folks the "American" way, which I believe to be is a welcoming, friendly, and respectful ethos to people of all backgrounds.
Based on my experience living in environment like that, the white people are the biggest offender of not being friendly and no longer saying "hi". It's definitely the generation thing to go along with high tech gadgets that make them more selfish. When you add diversity, you add fuel to the fire. It's like that in LA, Seattle and SF.
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Old 02-12-2013, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Newark, Ca
1,269 posts, read 1,906,970 times
Reputation: 1689
Quote:
Originally Posted by thechoson View Post
OP, I'm sorry you feel this way. I was born overseas (maybe in one of those countries from which those rich foreigners you are speaking of came from) but came to the United States at a young age. We did not settle in California at first, but rather a smallish "All-American" type town. We had no choice but to learn and speak English very quickly. And it was a community just as you describe. When we moved in there were many folks that were welcoming and friendly. It was a community we could leave the doors unlocked. And it was almost unheard of for me to go a day without complete strangers saying hello, people holding doors open for others, etc. It was a wonderful town/ community. I have not been back in years but I wonder if it's still like this. I hope so.

I personally do not believe that all the things you mention can be pinned on "foreigners". I noticed that when I moved to a larger city (and San Jose definitely counts) people were just less friendly in general. It also seems like a generational thing. I feel like as someone in my early 30s, I can somewhat criticize those of my generation and younger as being maybe a little less friendly and respectful of those "common courtesies" that I saw when I was a child. People of my generation that have money seem to be even worse in this regard. So what you are experiencing in your neighborhood may be influenced more by a generational change along with the infusion of wealth you describe.

The other issue you describe is, I believe, a symptom of a much larger phenomenon- Globalization. I could understand how or why it could feel like an invasion to you. I'll be honest. Even when I drive around and see blocks of stores with signs in foreign languages, I do feel a bit mixed and uncomfortable (even if that language happens to be my own "native" language!).

But at the same time, I hope you realize and understand the reach of American cultural and military imperialism in those very countries those "foreigners" came from. That coupled with capitalism (a strong American export) has changed very much how those countries look as well. Just take a walk down a street in any large city in a country like Japan, Korea, China, Vietnam, or India. It is littered with McDonald's, KFC, Starbucks, Pizza Hut, etc. Signs in English. The youths of these countries LOVE American culture. The music, the movies, the celebrities, etc. People can shop at Wal-Mart or Costco.

So as you can see, these things go both ways. And despite the issue of "globalization" being made into a dirty word by the politics of these times, there is not a single one of us here that does not somehow benefit from globalization. Some benefit much more, yes. But ultimately we are all better off.

I definitely do empathize with you and how you feel about the changing environment in your community. And I don't necessarily agree with any of those people that might just tell you to "move". You've lived there 40 years, it's YOUR community, why should you have to move? But ultimately I hope you find some peace with the fact that the community also belongs to the new people that are moving in as well. IT belongs to them just as much as it belongs to you, and hopefully you can play a part in showing some of those folks the "American" way, which I believe to be is a welcoming, friendly, and respectful ethos to people of all backgrounds.
Don't bother listening to this Foo Cities guy on here. He doesn't know what he's talking about and I'm not sure why he's even on this board since he's not from this area anyway.

I think your post is one of the best posts ever in this forum. It was very well thought out and is very informative. As a white guy who grew up in this area and who's parents grew up in the area, I wholeheartedly agree with your perspective on the issue.

I may get annoyed with "FOB's" at times, but I also get annoyed with ignorant white people too who think they have a claim on this part of the world and can't accept any sort of diversity here as well.
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