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Old 01-31-2013, 07:26 PM
 
13,829 posts, read 11,400,022 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnSoCal View Post
Then you obviously don't live in the same world that I do.

Guess not. We all have our filters and tend to extrapolate our personal experiences onto the world at large.
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Old 01-31-2013, 07:31 PM
 
13,829 posts, read 11,400,022 times
Reputation: 9746
Quote:
Originally Posted by never-more View Post
Source for the density? San Jose's density is reported as 5,600 on Wikipedia?
I would like a source too. However, Carlite was saying "population weighted density" which probably is not the same thing as general density. It probably filters out the parklands and uninhabited parts of the county.
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Old 01-31-2013, 07:37 PM
 
13,829 posts, read 11,400,022 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdumbgod View Post
Agree. As immigrants move in, they identify pockets of the valley and concentrate in them with their own. Nothing weird or surprising about that.
No disagreement there. I'm just saying, people tend to hang out like with like...In my experience SJ and SV are not as integrated as they may appear on the surface. But it is a generally tolerant area...more so than most places.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdumbgod View Post
If more Americans did better at learning STEM stuff, companies might be more interested in hiring natives.
No disagreements there. It's true.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdumbgod View Post
Regardless the days of...

...are in the past. It's a brave new world.
I'm not sure what you meant by that one. And I hate that expression "brave new world". Anyone who's read the book or seen the movie would know the "brave new world" being pushed on us is something to resist, not accept or promote.
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:37 PM
 
1,015 posts, read 669,828 times
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It's two different density calculations. The population weighted density is meant to capture the densities surrounding people where they live, so it does exclude uninhabited lands. The Census Bureau calculates it from the densities of census tracts. The other density figure is people divided by land area. That number is alright if you want to get an average of how heavily the land is occupied. But because it includes a lot of uninhabited land, it understates the densities at which people actually live.
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Old 01-31-2013, 09:37 PM
 
Location: San Jose, CA
7,356 posts, read 6,178,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post


I'm not sure what you meant by that one. And I hate that expression "brave new world". Anyone who's read the book or seen the movie would know the "brave new world" being pushed on us is something to resist, not accept or promote.
It ain't a fifties white people, 2.4 children, white picket fence world anymore, especially not in SJ.

Actually, Huxley lifted the title from Shakespeare:
Quote:
O wonder!
How many goodly creatures are there here!
How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world,
That has such people in't.

William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act V, Scene I, ll. 203–206
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Old 02-01-2013, 02:02 AM
Status: "Moving to Downtown San Jose" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: San Jose, CA
941 posts, read 1,531,193 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by never-more View Post
Doesn't look that integrated to me other than a few areas. This was from 2000 though, and things in the Bay Area have changed a lot since then.

Website: http://www.radicalcartography.net/
I found a different map for 2010 San Jose, besides there being more people in North San Jose, and other similar developments, the only other thing I can see as a trend is there is less people that call themselves white in Cupertino and vicinity.

Race and ethnicity 2010: San Jose | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

I think you could compare to SoCal here:
Race and ethnicity 2010: Long Beach | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
Race and ethnicity 2010: Los Angeles | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
Race and ethnicity 2010: Santa Ana | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
Race and ethnicity 2010: Riverside | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

LA Basin in particular to me looks balkanized on these maps, downtown LA being an exception, especially in comparison to the South Bay (Bay Area)

With regard to something the OP said, the ratio of men to women is something like 51:49 here, much like most West Coast cities, SF is actually a little worse in that regard. Disclaimer, I don't know how many of these women are in their 70s or 80s.

If you want single women to outnumber single men move to Washington DC, Baltimore, Philadelphia or NYC:
Where Single Men Way Outnumber Single Women?
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Old 02-01-2013, 10:41 AM
 
46 posts, read 31,545 times
Reputation: 36
This is an old thread...I agree mostly with the op except that I don't think San Jose is particularly clean. In fact, I think it's embarassingly dirty. Yes, there are plenty of places that are worse, but that's no excuse. I've vistied Hong Kong. That place, with far more people living much closer together is a LOT cleaner. They have plain clothes police officers that will hand you a $500.00 ticket for littering. We need that here.
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Old 02-01-2013, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Studio City, CA 91604
1,072 posts, read 767,182 times
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To me, San Jose always felt like someone cut a little chunk of Southern California off and dropped it right on the South Bay, just to mess with San Francisco...
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Old 02-01-2013, 05:28 PM
 
Location: San Jose, CA
7,356 posts, read 6,178,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tempest411 View Post
This is an old thread...I agree mostly with the op except that I don't think San Jose is particularly clean. In fact, I think it's embarassingly dirty. Yes, there are plenty of places that are worse, but that's no excuse. I've vistied Hong Kong. That place, with far more people living much closer together is a LOT cleaner. They have plain clothes police officers that will hand you a $500.00 ticket for littering. We need that here.
America’s Top 5 Cleanest Cities



#2 San Jose, California
(San Benito and Santa Clara counties)
Background: This area’s booming high-tech business during the 1980s and 1990s earned it the name Silicon Valley. Numerous semiconductor and computer chip manufacturers brought in huge numbers of highly educated workers, driving up house values and living costs. Then the dot-com bust hit, and San Jose suddenly lost 200,000 jobs. Now the city is seeking to reinvent itself as a center for innovation and research in such diverse fields as pharmaceuticals and automotives.
Problems: In the early 1980s, a leaking underground storage tank filled with trichloroethane, a solvent suspected of causing reproductive and developmental problems, was found to be contaminating the drinking water of 65,000 people near a semiconductor plant. Over the next few years Silicon Valley became dotted with Superfund sites; at one time, Santa Clara County had more such sites than any other county in the country. Besides the high-tech contamination, the Valley’s rapid growth resulted in extensive sprawl, which means traffic, and air pollution — trapped by surrounding mountains.
Solutions: The widespread pollution gave rise to a strong grass-roots environmental movement that pressured industry to clean up its mess. Industry responded by going the extra mile, setting higher standards for itself than required. The EPA, meanwhile, is overseeing the containment and cleanup of the Superfund sites. Because so much groundwater had been contaminated, the Santa Clara Valley Water District became a national leader in testing and protecting drinking water. As for its traffic woes, San Jose can thank the state of California for stricter regulations that have helped reduce the carbon monoxide and diesel particulates in the air. The bottom line for San Jose: It’s a city now known nationwide for its clean streets, fresh air, and healthy lifestyle.


America's Top 5 Cleanest Cities | Reader's Digest
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Old 02-01-2013, 05:52 PM
 
563 posts, read 298,765 times
Reputation: 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdumbgod View Post
America’s Top 5 Cleanest Cities



#2 San Jose, California
(San Benito and Santa Clara counties)
Background: This area’s booming high-tech business during the 1980s and 1990s earned it the name Silicon Valley. Numerous semiconductor and computer chip manufacturers brought in huge numbers of highly educated workers, driving up house values and living costs. Then the dot-com bust hit, and San Jose suddenly lost 200,000 jobs. Now the city is seeking to reinvent itself as a center for innovation and research in such diverse fields as pharmaceuticals and automotives.
Problems: In the early 1980s, a leaking underground storage tank filled with trichloroethane, a solvent suspected of causing reproductive and developmental problems, was found to be contaminating the drinking water of 65,000 people near a semiconductor plant. Over the next few years Silicon Valley became dotted with Superfund sites; at one time, Santa Clara County had more such sites than any other county in the country. Besides the high-tech contamination, the Valley’s rapid growth resulted in extensive sprawl, which means traffic, and air pollution — trapped by surrounding mountains.
Solutions: The widespread pollution gave rise to a strong grass-roots environmental movement that pressured industry to clean up its mess. Industry responded by going the extra mile, setting higher standards for itself than required. The EPA, meanwhile, is overseeing the containment and cleanup of the Superfund sites. Because so much groundwater had been contaminated, the Santa Clara Valley Water District became a national leader in testing and protecting drinking water. As for its traffic woes, San Jose can thank the state of California for stricter regulations that have helped reduce the carbon monoxide and diesel particulates in the air. The bottom line for San Jose: It’s a city now known nationwide for its clean streets, fresh air, and healthy lifestyle.


America's Top 5 Cleanest Cities | Reader's Digest
Still not enough. Talk to me again about how clean San Jose is when it's #2 in the WORLD.
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