U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Thanksgiving Day!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New Mexico > Santa Fe
 [Register]
Santa Fe Santa Fe County
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-08-2009, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque
5,553 posts, read 9,469,819 times
Reputation: 2462

Advertisements

Reservations and Pueblos are the same thing. It's just a naming convention. There are some other names for them in California and Nevada.

Most reservations are historically the same lands that those natives lived on when they were "discovered" by people of European descent. The current boundaries of Pueblos in New Mexico were set before they became US territory, but there are some disputes. Juan Tabo Canyon in the NE of Albuquerque (includes some Sandoval Co.) is claimed by Sandia Pueblo all the way to the Crest.

One big exception that I'm aware of is the Cherokee nation in Oklahoma. They were uprooted from their native/historic homelands in Georgia and other nearby parts when gold was "discovered" by people of European descent on what suddenly became *not* their land anymore.

To find out more about their removal, learn about the Trail of Tears. It is the US's own version of the Bataan Death March. Such things should never be forgotten or denied.

Last edited by mortimer; 04-08-2009 at 01:40 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-08-2009, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Home, Home on the Front Range
14,135 posts, read 7,213,068 times
Reputation: 6068
Quote:
Originally Posted by mortimer View Post
Reservations and Pueblos are the same thing. It's just a naming convention.

Most reservations are historically the same lands that those natives lived on when they were "discovered" by people of European descent.
Sorry, they are not the same thing. While pueblos may indeed be reservations, not all reservations are pueblos.

Pueblo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Some examples of non-pueblo reservations:
Mescalero Apache
Southern Ute
Pine Ridge
Navajo Nation
Swinomish
Wind River


Quote:
Originally Posted by mortimer View Post
One big exception that I'm aware of is the Cherokee nation in Oklahoma. They were uprooted from their native/historic homelands in Georgia and other nearby parts when gold was "discovered" by people of European descent on what suddenly became *not* their land anymore.

To find out more about their removal, learn about the Trail of Tears. It is the US's own version of the Bataan Death March. Such things should never be forgotten or denied.


PBS is running what looks to be an excellent series starting next week. One of the episodes details the 'Trail of Tears' truly one of the saddest chapters in our nation's history.

We Shall Remain | American Experience | PBS
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-08-2009, 04:27 PM
 
55 posts, read 124,017 times
Reputation: 45
The difference between a pueblo and a reservation stems from the fact that the Pueblo Indians had their land granted to them (as did the Mexican residents of New Mexico) in the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe-Hildago between the U.S. and Mexico, whereas most Indian reservations were established in treaties between the U.S. and the Indian tribes themselves. This gives the Pueblos a slightly different status in the eyes of the U.S. government. In most cases, however, this is simply an academic distinction which doesn't have many practical ramifications today.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-09-2009, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque
5,553 posts, read 9,469,819 times
Reputation: 2462
TigerLily24 said:

> Sorry, they are not the same thing. While pueblos may indeed be
> reservations, not all reservations are pueblos.

Those examples you cited simply don't refer to themselves as pueblos.

Many pueblos refer to themselves interchangeably as both pueblos and
reservations.

I did not say that all reservations are pueblos. I said that reservations
and pueblos are the same exact thing. They are both separate governmental
entities from the US state where they are located. They have their own
laws and courts and have land that has a defined boundary.

You cannot distinguish between a pueblo and a reservation other than by
their name. That is the answer to the original question posed by greycar
at the start of this thread.

The original term "pueblo" was simply coined in the SW by the Spaniards
who noticed a tendency of the original occupants of the area to have a
large, multi-family dwelling that was the center of that particular tribe's
cultural and territorial sphere of influence. Good examples are the Acoma
and Taos "pueblos" - referring to the actual building and not the reservation
owned by the pueblo (the tribe).

There were cultural centers and occupied villages in other parts of the US,
but these were lost and destroyed for various regions and the outside powers
that overran these tribal areas were not Spaniards.

It's kinda like referring to a raised, flat area as a "mesa" here in New Mexico,
but we call it a "bluff" in Arkansas.

Last edited by mortimer; 04-09-2009 at 10:03 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-09-2009, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Home, Home on the Front Range
14,135 posts, read 7,213,068 times
Reputation: 6068
Quote:
Originally Posted by mortimer View Post
Those examples you cited simply don't refer to themselves as pueblos.

Many pueblos refer to themselves interchangeably as both pueblos and
reservations.

I did not say that all reservations are pueblos. I said that reservations
and pueblos are the same exact thing. They are both separate governmental
entities from the US state where they are located. They have their own
laws and courts and have land that has a defined boundary.

You cannot distinguish between a pueblo and a reservation other than by
their name. That is the answer to the original question posed by greycar
at the start of this thread.

The original term "pueblo" was simply coined in the SW by the Spaniards
who noticed a tendency of the original occupants of the area to have a
large, multi-family dwelling that was the center of that particular tribe's
cultural and territorial sphere of influence. Good examples are the Acoma
and Taos "pueblos" - referring to the actual building and not the reservation
owned by the pueblo (the tribe).

There were cultural centers and occupied villages in other parts of the US,
but these were lost and destroyed for various regions and the outside powers
that overran these tribal areas were not Spaniards.

It's kinda like referring to a raised, flat area as a "mesa" here in New Mexico,
but we call it a "bluff" in Arkansas.

Thanks for the clarifications
I know that when I think of pueblos, I do think of the actual historical dwellings within the land boundaries, exactly like the examples you provided. Those, along with their geographic locations, are the main points of differentiation for me.
I find 'pueblo' a much more specific reference than 'reservation' in that when someone says 'pueblo' most likely they are referring to an historical, indigenous homeland that exists in the southwest, and particularly in New Mexico, as opposed to a 'reservation' that can be located anywhere in the U.S. or Canada.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-09-2009, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque
5,553 posts, read 9,469,819 times
Reputation: 2462
TigerLily24 added:

> I find 'pueblo' a much more specific reference than 'reservation'
> ... someone says 'pueblo' most likely they are referring to
> ... that exists in the southwest, and particularly in New Mexico, ...

I absolutely cannot argue against that.

Say "pueblo" and I know you are probably talking about a res' in New Mexico.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-09-2009, 03:26 PM
 
Location: New Mexico USA
17,521 posts, read 18,698,101 times
Reputation: 20151
In the Spanish speaking parts of Europe, the Caribbean and to the best of my recollection Central and South America, Pueblo normally refers to a small village or town.

It appears that in the SW United States, it generally refers to Native American towns, villages etc.



Rich

Last edited by Poncho_NM; 04-09-2009 at 03:27 PM.. Reason: berry bad engelish...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New Mexico > Santa Fe
Similar Threads
View detailed profiles of:

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:26 AM.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top