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View Poll Results: Do Find living on the west coast of Florida gay friendly?
A: Not at All 4 28.57%
B: Somewhat 4 28.57%
C: Very 4 28.57%
D: Definitly 2 14.29%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 14. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-01-2009, 01:41 PM
 
1 posts, read 7,301 times
Reputation: 12
Default Help Looking for a Gay or Gay Friendly Doctor in the Tampa to Ft Myer Corridor

Does anyone know of a good gay doctor. I need a primary care and have insurance but tring to find a gay doctor is very hard. Help Please
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Old 06-01-2009, 01:45 PM
 
Location: where my heart is
5,643 posts, read 3,700,984 times
Reputation: 1661
It is sad that you even have to ask that question at all. Medical care is medical care. Your sexual orientation should not be an issue, anymore than the color of your skin should be.
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Old 06-01-2009, 04:24 PM
 
92 posts, read 208,437 times
Reputation: 55
This is why I can't STAND gays. They always have to try to make a "gay" version of everything. Maybe someone can help me find a straight doctor.
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Old 06-01-2009, 05:37 PM
 
Location: North Port
325 posts, read 559,641 times
Reputation: 87
Do, Gay doctors know something different than straight doctors? Different schools?
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Old 06-01-2009, 06:01 PM
 
9 posts, read 19,946 times
Reputation: 57
cameraLens and kbuild, You shouldn't have a problem finding a "straight" doctor. The overwhelming majority of doctors are straight.

But a lot of people who are gay, would prefer to have a doctor who is either gay or "gay-friendly." Some gay people don't care, but others do.

It would be like a Hispanic, Asian, etc. patient who would prefer, if given a choice, to have a doctor who speaks the same language or from the same cultural background as they are, so they might have a better understanding of Latin, Asian, etc. cultural perspectives toward the body & healthcare.

Another example could be a Catholic or Jewish person, who might prefer to seek out a regular or family doctor who is of their same religious background, if religion is a very important aspect of the person's life.

Of course, the topic of one's cultural background and religion is NOWHERE near as controversial as homosexuality. A lot of people who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgendered may not feel comfortable disclosing their sexual orientation to their doctors, especially if they have not "come out" or shared this information with anyone else.

Furthermore, a lot of gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgendered people may not feel comfortable being open and honest about their sexuality because they might fear or believe they might be judged or treated harshly by their doctors, especially if the doctors have a strong bias against homosexuality.

True stories -- I know of a gay guy who was from a rural small town who was told by a (presumably, straight) doctor that "gays should accept having diarrhea if they have anal sex." I have a lesbian friend, who when she was younger, she told her (male & supposedly straight) doctor that she was a lesbian, and when the doctor was doing her GYN exam later on, he told her, "it might hurt a little bit when I insert my finger, perhaps because you don't like to have men down here."

You might ask why it is important for doctors to even know about the sexuality of their patients?

Well it does matter. A young man who is engaging in sex with other men, is probably not going to be too concerned about getting a woman pregnant. But he should know about the risks of getting HIV or other sexually transmitted infections, since he would be at a higher risk. Gay men are also more likely to have depression than straight men are.

A lesbian might feel frustrated at a doctor who tells her to use birth control, because she is having sex, with no intention of having kids. In reality, she wouldn't technically need birth control if she is only having sex or intimate relations with other women.

Finding a "gay" or "gay-friendly" doctor isn't a "gay version" of everything -- it's really about finding a health care professional that you can trust to share your deepest concerns related to your body, health, and overall well-being.

Last edited by CA_native_son; 06-01-2009 at 06:10 PM..
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Old 06-01-2009, 06:21 PM
 
Location: where my heart is
5,643 posts, read 3,700,984 times
Reputation: 1661
I have never heard my daughter say that she needed to go see a doctor who was gay friendly. She just goes to whatever doctor is on her list of approved providers for whatever ailment under her medical insurance.

Yes, she has been to a gyn for an infection, a very common one all females can get, even baby girls. The doctor didn't ask and she most certainly did not tell.
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Old 06-01-2009, 06:37 PM
 
9 posts, read 19,946 times
Reputation: 57
Article from "Orlando Sentinel" newspaper, 2007. "Doctors catering to gays are rare"

Jordan a 39 year-old real estate agent discovered this for himself after moving from South Carolina. 'I just wanted a gay doctor for obvious reasons. It's easier if the doctor is like you.'

However, Jordan was unable to locate one gay doctor in the Orlando area and his friends were unable to recommend anyone either. Upon delving further Jordan discovered that many of his friends were visiting straight doctors and hiding their sexuality from them; a move that Jordan views as un-healthy.

Jordan eventually tracked down a practitioner advertising in the Watermark, a local newspaper only because he refused to give up.

Gay Orlando ranks in the top 10 nationwide with an estimated population of 80,000 LGBT, so why are there so few gay doctors?

According to Chistopher Blackwell, assistant professor in the College of Nursing UCF, this is because there is a fear of ostracism within the medical profession.

As Blackwell said, 'we still live in a society where homophobia and heterosexism exist. Those physicians are dealing with the same stigmas as any LGBT person, and they are having to deal with the professional ramifications as well.'

And yet, a large part of being treated by a medical professional is being open about your lifestyle, especially when this can play an important role in early detection of ailments that you may be more susceptible to.

It took Jordan 14 years of perseverance to find a doctor he could connected with on an equal level in Orlando, hopefully for those LGBT who do not disclose their sexuality to their medical practitioner they too will find someone of a similar nature in the near future.
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Old 06-02-2009, 05:29 AM
 
Location: New Hampshire
379 posts, read 812,682 times
Reputation: 198
"Gay Friendly"...code words for I would always rather deal with gay people. Bigotry comes in all colors of the rainbow.
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Old 06-02-2009, 06:51 PM
 
48 posts, read 134,720 times
Reputation: 32
You can check the provider directory of the Gay Lesbian Medical Association. More than 2,000 gay-friendly doctors are members of this organization, which provides education to health care professionals about LGBT needs.
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Old 06-04-2009, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Sarasota area
354 posts, read 1,156,844 times
Reputation: 207
Quote:
Originally Posted by CA_native_son View Post
cameraLens and kbuild, You shouldn't have a problem finding a "straight" doctor. The overwhelming majority of doctors are straight.

But a lot of people who are gay, would prefer to have a doctor who is either gay or "gay-friendly." Some gay people don't care, but others do.

It would be like a Hispanic, Asian, etc. patient who would prefer, if given a choice, to have a doctor who speaks the same language or from the same cultural background as they are, so they might have a better understanding of Latin, Asian, etc. cultural perspectives toward the body & healthcare.

Another example could be a Catholic or Jewish person, who might prefer to seek out a regular or family doctor who is of their same religious background, if religion is a very important aspect of the person's life.

Of course, the topic of one's cultural background and religion is NOWHERE near as controversial as homosexuality. A lot of people who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgendered may not feel comfortable disclosing their sexual orientation to their doctors, especially if they have not "come out" or shared this information with anyone else.

Furthermore, a lot of gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgendered people may not feel comfortable being open and honest about their sexuality because they might fear or believe they might be judged or treated harshly by their doctors, especially if the doctors have a strong bias against homosexuality.

True stories -- I know of a gay guy who was from a rural small town who was told by a (presumably, straight) doctor that "gays should accept having diarrhea if they have anal sex." I have a lesbian friend, who when she was younger, she told her (male & supposedly straight) doctor that she was a lesbian, and when the doctor was doing her GYN exam later on, he told her, "it might hurt a little bit when I insert my finger, perhaps because you don't like to have men down here."

You might ask why it is important for doctors to even know about the sexuality of their patients?

Well it does matter. A young man who is engaging in sex with other men, is probably not going to be too concerned about getting a woman pregnant. But he should know about the risks of getting HIV or other sexually transmitted infections, since he would be at a higher risk. Gay men are also more likely to have depression than straight men are.

A lesbian might feel frustrated at a doctor who tells her to use birth control, because she is having sex, with no intention of having kids. In reality, she wouldn't technically need birth control if she is only having sex or intimate relations with other women.

Finding a "gay" or "gay-friendly" doctor isn't a "gay version" of everything -- it's really about finding a health care professional that you can trust to share your deepest concerns related to your body, health, and overall well-being.
These types of comments, if really true, are totally out of line and unacceptable by anyone, especially a doctor. Personally I don't see why it matters if your doctor is gay or straight. Healthcare is healthcare and if you feel you can't be open to your doctor, whether they're gay or straight, maybe you shouldn't be going to them.
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