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Old 09-29-2012, 11:33 PM
 
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I was reading about the increasing acidification of oceans and how huge numbers of fish are dwindling fast. I wondered if at some point in the future things could get so dire that large bodies of water would have to be turned into virtual fish sanctuaries and hatcheries and then the idea of shutting off Hudson Bay at its narrow mouth with a giant dam at McCall island and stretching north to the tip of land above it (or some similar nearby narrow stretch) might have to become a reality in order to keep acidification from reaching the Bay and keep enough salt-water fish alive to continue feeding populations.

Granted, this would take engineering techniques we don't currently possess but they would have to be developed in the face of a looming ocean cataclysm.

Feasible, or so off-the-charts crazy that it doesn't even warrant comment?
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Old 09-30-2012, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Texas
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The gulf coast is already a "Dead Sea". Fish are not thriving like they should be -- not enough oxygen, probably.
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Old 09-30-2012, 09:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian.Pearson View Post
The gulf coast is already a "Dead Sea". Fish are not thriving like they should be -- not enough oxygen, probably.
Hmmmm, yeah....the Gulf could not be closed off. The Hudson Bay could if there was the technology to close off the narrow strait, which is similar to Gibralter---and I think engineers toyed with Gibralter for a while.
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Old 10-02-2012, 01:17 AM
 
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We could throw some giant Tums into our water. Donate to Tums research.
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Old 10-02-2012, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Texas
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BP and maybe others, used bacteria to eat the oil, but otherwise there is no change. I recently saw an ad by BP. They showed a guy on a nice boat catching a nice fish, but I didn't buy that. I had read another article talking about how lean the fish are, and that the good tasting fish are the ones with fat content.

But what the heck? May as well throw a few tons of tums out there...
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Old 10-04-2012, 10:32 PM
 
16,301 posts, read 24,254,280 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian.Pearson View Post
BP and maybe others, used bacteria to eat the oil, but otherwise there is no change. I recently saw an ad by BP. They showed a guy on a nice boat catching a nice fish, but I didn't buy that. I had read another article talking about how lean the fish are, and that the good tasting fish are the ones with fat content.

But what the heck? May as well throw a few tons of tums out there...
Seen the movie Avatar? Remember how real that looked every time you see something like that ad.
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Old 10-05-2012, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Sinking in the Great Salt Lake
12,904 posts, read 18,471,181 times
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We could stop fishing the hell out of the oceans with very high-yield netting techniques for one. Not taking more from the environment than it can replace is a foreign concept to "civilized man" I know, but it just might work...
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Old 10-06-2012, 10:19 AM
Status: "My eyes are rolled back so far I can see my brain." (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Here.
13,399 posts, read 11,902,075 times
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Do you have a link to substantiate the claim that the number of fish are dwindling fast? Not doubting you, but I had not heard this and would be interested in learning more.

Even if the Hudson were dammed, wouldn't the bay still become acidic? Not all runoff from land flows into the Hudson; some goes directly to the ocean.

Seems to me it would be more effective to deal with the pollution at its source: factory drainage, storm drains, air pollution, banning certain chemicals, etc.
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