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Old 02-19-2013, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,368,837 times
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All of those examples are good and we can figure out how to merge the AI with our brain making us all smarter then Einstein in the 2020's. What kind of impact will that have?
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Old 02-19-2013, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,368,837 times
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Default Brain Map: President Obama Proposes First Detailed Guide of Human Brain Function

This is more information on it from Time Magazine.

To navigate something as complex and dynamic as the brain, a map would help.

Researchers have learned an enormous amount about how we think, what drives our behaviors, and why we feel the way we do since President George H.W. Bush proclaimed the 1990s the “decade of the brain,” but many fundamental questions about the three-pound universe remain unanswered. So President Obama has proposed a Brain Activity Map (BAM) project to reveal some of these remaining secrets, using the Human Genome Project as a model. Not all scientists, however, are on board.


Read more: Brain Map: President Obama Proposes First Detailed Guide of Human Brain Function | TIME.com


It, also, has links to other stories they have done on it.

Last edited by Josseppie; 02-19-2013 at 07:07 PM..
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Old 02-20-2013, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Kent, Ohio
3,306 posts, read 1,949,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Mapping of the brain will more than likely be a key part in developing a real artificial intelligence OS. (We are all doomed! )
Yes, a detailed understanding of how the brain works will probably be a big help in achieving genuine AI. The dream of reaching true AI is starting to feel like an expedition to reach the end of a rainbow. Since the 1950s, every decade has felt as though AI was just a decade away. We've made some amazing progress, but right now we still seem to be a loooong way from true AI. Most estimates suggest another 20 to 30 years. But, given the rapid advances in our ability to analyze detailed brain function, there's no telling how soon AI might arrive. For example:

A new field called optogenetics combines optics and genetics to map specific neural pathways. This work is often compared to "creating a road map." The basic idea is that genes can control the production of certain dyes (e.g., jellyfish can make green fluorescent proteins), as well as molecules that react to light (e.g., rhodopsin). Armed with these sorts of tools, we are - for the first time in history - able to identify individual neural circuits governing specific animal behaviors. And now that we can do this, we can build models of the brain with accuracy down nearly to the level of individual neurons. For example, a computer called "Blue Gene," (which is capable of computing 500 trillion operations per second), has simulated a few seconds of the thinking processes of a mouse brain (about 2 million neurons). Then, just a few years later, in 2007, scientists simulated an entire rat's brain (55 million neurons). Then, in 2009 they simulated 1% of the human cerebral cortex (1.6 billion neurons with 9 trillion connections - roughly equivalent to a cat's brain). At this amazing pace of advancement, I wouldn't be too surprised if AI hit the streets far sooner than the 20 to 30 year prediction. Of course it depends on how helpful the brain science is in designing AI. That still seems to be a wildcard in the equation.

And, once we get true AI...well, all I can say is...wow! That will be a major game-changer.
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Old 02-20-2013, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,368,837 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylenwoof View Post
Yes, a detailed understanding of how the brain works will probably be a big help in achieving genuine AI. The dream of reaching true AI is starting to feel like an expedition to reach the end of a rainbow. Since the 1950s, every decade has felt as though AI was just a decade away. We've made some amazing progress, but right now we still seem to be a loooong way from true AI. Most estimates suggest another 20 to 30 years. But, given the rapid advances in our ability to analyze detailed brain function, there's no telling how soon AI might arrive. For example:

A new field called optogenetics combines optics and genetics to map specific neural pathways. This work is often compared to "creating a road map." The basic idea is that genes can control the production of certain dyes (e.g., jellyfish can make green fluorescent proteins), as well as molecules that react to light (e.g., rhodopsin). Armed with these sorts of tools, we are - for the first time in history - able to identify individual neural circuits governing specific animal behaviors. And now that we can do this, we can build models of the brain with accuracy down nearly to the level of individual neurons. For example, a computer called "Blue Gene," (which is capable of computing 500 trillion operations per second), has simulated a few seconds of the thinking processes of a mouse brain (about 2 million neurons). Then, just a few years later, in 2007, scientists simulated an entire rat's brain (55 million neurons). Then, in 2009 they simulated 1% of the human cerebral cortex (1.6 billion neurons with 9 trillion connections - roughly equivalent to a cat's brain). At this amazing pace of advancement, I wouldn't be too surprised if AI hit the streets far sooner than the 20 to 30 year prediction. Of course it depends on how helpful the brain science is in designing AI. That still seems to be a wildcard in the equation.

And, once we get true AI...well, all I can say is...wow! That will be a major game-changer.
From what I have read today there are super computers that are fast enough to simulate the human brain and by 2019 a computer that costs 1,000 dollars will be fast enough to simulate the human brain. If you look at the I Phone 4S that has rudimentary AI as we can talk to it and "she" actually responds. By 2015 with the google glasses coming out we should be able to have more conversations with "her" or hopefully by then a guy, I would rather talk to a hot 20 something guy then a girl , and it will continue to improve exponentially. So by the 2020's when we have reversed engineered the brain and computers are many times faster then they are now we should have the kind of AI that right now some people are saying will be 20 or 30 years out. That is because most people do not understand the impact technology advancing exponentially has as in 30 years we will be at the singularity where one computer that costs 1,000 dollars will be 1 billion times more intelligent then all the humans on the planet today combined.
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Old 02-20-2013, 05:05 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,368,837 times
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One thing I want to add that is becoming a pet peeve of mine is they are not "mapping" the brain they are working on simulations. That might not seem like a big difference but it is as a map is just that a map but a simulation will give us the knowledge of how the brian works and where things like our conscious comes from.

This is the blue brain project in Euroipe but ours will have the same goal:

The aim of the project, founded in May 2005 by the Brain and Mind Institute of the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Switzerland) is to study the brain's architectural and functional principles. The project is headed by the Institute's director, Henry Markram. Using a Blue Gene supercomputer running Michael Hines's NEURON software, the simulation does not consist simply of an artificial neural network, but involves a biologically realistic model of neurons. It is hoped that it will eventually shed light on the nature of consciousness.

The link: Blue Brain Project - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 02-21-2013, 05:33 PM
Status: "Not politically correct" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Western Colorado
10,557 posts, read 11,657,101 times
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Some of these post are hysterical. The brain is so complex, I think this is actually pretty amazing stuff.
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