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Old 12-10-2013, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,344,698 times
Reputation: 4131

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This was a interesting segment on 3D printers. Plus it, also, shows how man is merging with machine.

This is from CBS:

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Old 12-12-2013, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,344,698 times
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Exclamation Surgical 3D printing BioPen writes in bone, nerve and muscle

This could really change how we fix our bones and many other things in the next few years!

This is from DVICE:


Scientists at the University of Wollongong (that's a real place) in Australia have developed a device that replaces traditional surgery with something more akin to an art project. The BioPen is a handheld 3D printer that can actually print bone directly onto patients during surgery. Soon, surgeons will simply be able to doodle their patients back to health.

The BioPen uses a stem cell ink which can be coaxed into differentiating into muscle, bone, or nerve cells. A seaweed-based growth culture encourages the cells to thrive in their new environment while a second polymer, cured by the use of a UV light, provides a protective shell during the healing process. The complex and adaptive bio-ink can even be further augmented to include growth hormone and other substances that would encourage rapid recovery.

The link: Surgical 3D printing BioPen writes in bone, nerve and muscle | DVICE
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Old 01-30-2014, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,344,698 times
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Exclamation Mark One: The World's First Carbon Fiber 3D Printer

This came across my Facebook so I decided to post it here.

This is from GZMODO:


Carbon fiber is a wonderful material, strong and lightweight. But building with it is both intimidatingly complex and prohibitively expensive—which is why Mark Forged has developed this new 3D printer which can build objects layer-by-layer using the stuff.

Unveiled at SolidWorks World 2014 in San Diego, the Mark One can print in carbon fiber, fiberglass, nylon and PLA. And perhaps most strikingly it looks sleek. Real sleek. Almost like Jony Ive has a hand in designing it. In fact, it measures just 23 inches wide, 12 inches tall and 13 inches deep, so it could even sit on a desktop alongside your Mac if you were so inclined.

The link: Mark One: The World's First Carbon Fiber 3D Printer
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Old 02-19-2014, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,344,698 times
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Now 3D printers can print out furniture.

This is from DVICE:

Massive BigRep 3D printer can generate entire pieces of furniture.

The link: Massive BigRep 3D printer can generate entire pieces of furniture | DVICE
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Old 02-21-2014, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,344,698 times
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They are now 3D printing metal!

This is from Popular Science:





Metal, despite being one of the most ubiquitous building materials, isn't something we see in 3-D printing too often. (Seriously: we've got pizza before small-scale, consumer steel printing.) But software company Autodesk, working with Dutch designer Joris Laarman, created a new system that could make the process at least a little more affordable.

The project, MX3D-Metal, uses custom software and an off-the-shelf robot arm to lay quick-cooling molten metal down in strands. The metal cools down fast enough that it can be manipulated into forming long, detailed pieces, like what you see here.
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Old 02-22-2014, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,344,698 times
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Talking Essential step toward printing living human tissues

Anoher major advancemet in 3D printing organs!

This is from Science Daily:


new bioprinting method developed at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) creates intricately patterned 3D tissue constructs with multiple types of cells and tiny blood vessels. The work represents a major step toward a longstanding goal of tissue engineers: creating human tissue constructs realistic enough to test drug safety and effectiveness.

The method also represents an early but important step toward building fully functional replacements for injured or diseased tissue that can be designed from CAT scan data using computer-aided design (CAD), printed in 3D at the push of a button, and used by surgeons to repair or replace damaged tissue.

"This is the foundational step toward creating 3D living tissue," said Jennifer Lewis, Ph.D., senior author of the study, who is a Core Faculty Member of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, and the Hansjörg Wyss Professor of Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard SEAS. Along with lead author David Kolesky, a graduate student in SEAS and the Wyss Institute, her team reported the results February 18 in the journal Advanced Materials.

The link: Essential step toward printing living human tissues -- ScienceDaily
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Old 03-06-2014, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,344,698 times
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Exclamation Artificial Organs May Finally Get a Blood Supply

More information on how we are getting close to 3D printing organs especially since its information technology thus advancing exponentially.

This is from MIT Technology Review:

In what may be a critical breakthrough for creating artificial organs, Harvard researchers say they have created tissue interlaced with blood vessels.

Using a custom-built four-head 3-D printer and a “disappearing” ink, materials scientist Jennifer Lewis and her team created a patch of tissue containing skin cells and biological structural material interwoven with blood-vessel-like structures. Reported by the team in Advanced Materials, the tissue is the first made through 3-D printing to include potentially functional blood vessels embedded among multiple, patterned cell types.

The link: 3-D Printing Blood Vessels into Artificial Tissues Could Eliminate Need for Donor Organs | MIT Technology Review
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Old 03-07-2014, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,344,698 times
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Exclamation 3D Printed Heart Saves a Child’s Life

Another major advancement in 3D printing!

This is from Interesting Engineering:


3D printing is getting more and more new applications every day. Although it looks more suitable for industrial manufactures, the latest application of the 3D printing process is regarding medicine. If we have to be more exact – heart surgery.

Roland Lian Cung Bawi of Owensboro was born 14 months ago and has the misfortune of having four congenital heart defects. The life-saving heart surgery was held at Kosair Children’s Hospital in collaboration with engineers from the University of Louisville.

- See more at: 3D Printed Heart Saves a Child's Life - Technology News
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Old 03-20-2014, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,344,698 times
Reputation: 4131
Exclamation The Germans Have Figured Out How to 3-D Print Cars

Another advancement in 3D printers.

This is from Wired:

The assembly line isn’t going away, but 3-D printing is going to reshape how we make cars. The EDAG Genesis points the way, with an beautifully crafted frame made from a range of materials and inspired by a turtle’s skeleton.

The German engineering firm showed off the Genesis design concept at the Geneva Motor Show as proof that additive manufacturing–EDAG’s fancy term for 3-D printing–can be used to make full-size car components. It’s on an entirely different scale than the tiny, 3-D printed creations coming out of a desktop Makerbot, but it’s also just a frame–a stylized chassis that’s more art than reality.

The link: The Germans Have Figured Out How to 3-D Print Cars | Autopia | Wired.com
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Old 07-01-2014, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,344,698 times
Reputation: 4131
Exclamation Bio-printing transplantable tissues, organs: Another step closer

This is another great advancement is being able to print organs.

This is from Science Daily:


Researchers have made a giant leap towards the goal of 'bio-printing' transplantable tissues and organs for people affected by major diseases and trauma injuries, a new study reports. Scientists have bio-printed artificial vascular networks mimicking the body's circulatory system that are necessary for growing large complex tissues.

The link: Bio-printing transplantable tissues, organs: Another step closer -- ScienceDaily
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