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Old 03-06-2013, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,435 posts, read 41,675,230 times
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Old 03-06-2013, 10:32 AM
 
37,072 posts, read 38,323,723 times
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Coolest thing we did was dissolve a penny in sulfuric acid and then a whole bunch of other chemical reactions that followed. You had to weigh the resultant copper at the end, part of the grade was how close you were to the original amount of copper.
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Old 03-08-2013, 07:23 PM
 
15,924 posts, read 16,863,377 times
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We played coating coins with mercury....
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Old 03-08-2013, 08:41 PM
 
Location: God's Gift to Mankind for flying anything
5,170 posts, read 10,489,634 times
Reputation: 3969
We figured out how to make stink bombs and then got suspended ...
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Old 03-10-2013, 10:18 AM
 
15,762 posts, read 13,191,044 times
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We did about a 1/3 of them when I taught chemistry. There are some real problems with many of those labs. First, multiple ones use highly toxic chemicals that are not allowed in high schools, or are incredibly dangerous to dispose of. Second, I like explosions, you like explosions, we all like explosions, but when you teach children how to make explosions they frequently try to replicate them outside of school with disasterous results.

One of the favorite demos I did was the gummibear sacrifice. It uses sodium or potassium hypochlorate and I had a parent who was a low level lab tech call me to ask its cas number. Apparently he was ordering some for his kid. While it was clearly not my fault, and I had explained the inherent danger in these chemicals, I know if something had happened to that child I would have been held responsible.

So cool or not, many labs are not suitable for school.
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Old 03-11-2013, 05:37 AM
 
3,596 posts, read 3,579,205 times
Reputation: 4957
Breathing in sulfur hexafluoride
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Old 03-15-2013, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,505 posts, read 49,588,323 times
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Ever try to breath in helium from a store bought balloon and then talk? Your voice does go all squeeky.

Try ordering 50 gallons of concentrated nitric acid from you friendly local chemical supplier some day. Be prepared for some very nasty people asking a lot of questions.
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Old 03-16-2013, 06:04 PM
 
10 posts, read 13,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
Coolest thing we did was dissolve a penny in sulfuric acid and then a whole bunch of other chemical reactions that followed. You had to weigh the resultant copper at the end, part of the grade was how close you were to the original amount of copper.
Cool experiment to illustrate the conservation of mass!
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Old 03-18-2013, 02:39 PM
 
Location: NW Penna.
1,756 posts, read 3,045,466 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irman View Post
We figured out how to make stink bombs and then got suspended ...
LMBO! back in college days, I was a work study employee lab assistant, and the chemistry prof, who was known to be a drinker, decided to have Fun Day with the freshmen chem students. We two lab assistants were out in the front classroom lab watching the students do their fun-chemistry assignments. Prof was by himself in the stockroom next door, doing something in the hood back there.

Suddenly there was a massive thunderous BOOM! from the back of the stickroom, and all the shelves of glassware ratted. The freshmen all bolted out of the lab and didn't bother to look back. We lab assistants ran to the stockroom to see what happened. We met the prof coming out. The hair was singed off his arms, his eyebrows were gone, and he was brushing singed hair off of his head. His skin looked a little more ruddy than usual.

What was he doing? Some "Hindenburg" experiment that he thought would be a fun demonstration of a hydrogen explosion. He'd rigged a hydrogen generating reaction per the instructions, and had filled a rubber balloon with the stuff. But the writeup had said SMALL balloon, and he used a LARGE balloon. So when he lit the thing off, it was a huge fireball explosion.
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Old 04-02-2013, 08:06 AM
 
23,940 posts, read 17,603,952 times
Reputation: 12821
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
We did about a 1/3 of them when I taught chemistry. There are some real problems with many of those labs. First, multiple ones use highly toxic chemicals that are not allowed in high schools, or are incredibly dangerous to dispose of. Second, I like explosions, you like explosions, we all like explosions, but when you teach children how to make explosions they frequently try to replicate them outside of school with disasterous results.

One of the favorite demos I did was the gummibear sacrifice. It uses sodium or potassium hypochlorate and I had a parent who was a low level lab tech call me to ask its cas number. Apparently he was ordering some for his kid. While it was clearly not my fault, and I had explained the inherent danger in these chemicals, I know if something had happened to that child I would have been held responsible.

So cool or not, many labs are not suitable for school.
i had a shop teacher who tried to teach us the dangers of oxygen/acetylene torches by filling a toy balloon with ox/acet, taping a fireworks fuse to it, and lighting it off for a powerful explosion.

you can probably guess what we spent the next three-four weeks after school doing...
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