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Old 05-31-2013, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,104 posts, read 20,372,219 times
Reputation: 4132

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Given the fact technology advances exponentially I am not worried about climate change at all.
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Old 05-31-2013, 02:59 PM
 
26,958 posts, read 38,201,283 times
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Nice Google, but your own admission is appalling.
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Old 05-31-2013, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,104 posts, read 20,372,219 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
Nice Google, but your own admission is appalling.
Are you referring to me? I don't ever remember referring to google as "appalling"?
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Old 05-31-2013, 05:57 PM
 
26,958 posts, read 38,201,283 times
Reputation: 34904
No. I hate when a post ends up in the middle. An argument for always quoting the post one is answering.

Sorry I messed with your head.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimj View Post
Um, yeah.
Time-series (1996 to 2012) of total polar ozone mean values over the months of September, October and November as measured by GOME, SCIAMACHY and GOME-2 flown on ERS-2, Envisat and MetOp-A, respectively. Smaller ozone holes are evident


(Phys.org)—Satellites show that the recent ozone hole over Antarctica was the smallest seen in the past decade. Long-term observations also reveal that Earth's ozone has been strengthening following international agreements to protect this vital layer of the atmosphere.

Read more at: Is the ozone layer on the road to recovery?
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Old 05-31-2013, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,104 posts, read 20,372,219 times
Reputation: 4132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
No. I hate when a post ends up in the middle. An argument for always quoting the post one is answering.

Sorry I messed with your head.
No worries. I have done that many times...
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Old 05-31-2013, 07:06 PM
Status: "Finally Done With C-D BYE BYE" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: LEAVING CD
22,947 posts, read 21,512,706 times
Reputation: 15431
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
No. I hate when a post ends up in the middle. An argument for always quoting the post one is answering.

Sorry I messed with your head.
Pardonnez-moi, the error was all mine. I do have to say life is too short to worry about such things.
By the by I did quote the post I answered. Please feel free to go look again.
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Old 06-19-2013, 05:59 PM
 
1 posts, read 701 times
Reputation: 10
Default dissipation

while i don't believe that the energy wave idea that you spoke of is feasible i believe that there is another way to disrupt and dissipate a tornado. now as i understand tornadoes, they are formed when a warm low pressure draft raises and meets a cold high pressure draft that is descending and as they collide and twist they forma a vacuum space that continues to draw in both high/cold and low/warm pressure air into it and continuing the cyclical motion of the funnel. if this is the case than it is the balance of the hot and cold air being drawn in that sustains a tornado and if we could either heat of cool the air going into/already in the funnel it would overbalance one side causing a disruption in the tornado causing it to dissipate.

if that is a possible way to dissipate tornadoes then it seems that it wouldn't be extremely difficult to find a way to heat air.
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Old 06-19-2013, 10:07 PM
Status: "Finally Done With C-D BYE BYE" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: LEAVING CD
22,947 posts, read 21,512,706 times
Reputation: 15431
Quote:
Originally Posted by junkdog8 View Post
while i don't believe that the energy wave idea that you spoke of is feasible i believe that there is another way to disrupt and dissipate a tornado. now as i understand tornadoes, they are formed when a warm low pressure draft raises and meets a cold high pressure draft that is descending and as they collide and twist they forma a vacuum space that continues to draw in both high/cold and low/warm pressure air into it and continuing the cyclical motion of the funnel. if this is the case than it is the balance of the hot and cold air being drawn in that sustains a tornado and if we could either heat of cool the air going into/already in the funnel it would overbalance one side causing a disruption in the tornado causing it to dissipate.

if that is a possible way to dissipate tornadoes then it seems that it wouldn't be extremely difficult to find a way to heat air.
That has to be the answer!
Why do you think you never see a tornado anywhere near the Capitol or White House?
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