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Old 02-03-2014, 09:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
With PHP being such an outdated language with a huge decline, I'm surprised that it's being suggested.
Historical trends in the usage of server-side programming languages, February 2014




Last edited by thecoalman; 02-03-2014 at 09:13 AM..
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Old 02-03-2014, 10:41 AM
 
Location: SoCal
5,922 posts, read 9,074,528 times
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I wouldn't call Matlab a language - it's a platform. Apparently TIOBE doesn't agree with me.

There's a lot to be said for starting at the "bottom" (closer to the hardware) and teaching them C, along with an intro to object-oriented programming. That would give them a foundation to learn C#/C++/Java on their own.

Alternately, I would suggest C# or Java, with a brief intro to Perl/Ruby/Python et al. I'm not sure I'd take the time to introduce Objective-C because you can program for Mac OS using Java.
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Old 02-03-2014, 11:39 AM
 
Location: The Carolinas
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C++ will be difficult to learn from scratch. I've been programming for 25+ years and have learned a lot of languages.

For teaching, I would suggest Java. Everything you need to teach Java is free.

If you're teaching programmers who need to graduate the class and start programming for a job right away, I would suggest Microsoft ASP/.net
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Old 02-03-2014, 11:45 AM
 
570 posts, read 1,450,072 times
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php is for web development, so it's not really good for beginner.

Knowing C+/C#/java is much more important. When you know java,C#, you will know how to code in php, and more like video game, and other applications.

Java might be a good start since it's free. Visual studio is expensive, there is a free version too.
It looks like there are more jobs for .net in my area, but it could be different depends on region.
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Old 02-03-2014, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
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I have a question; as someone who has never learned a word of code or programming language, and regrets it, is it important that you learn a programming language or that you learn a specific programming language. In terms of learning a linguistic language, learning one will greatly make learning a second and third easier. I would imagine the concepts are the same, no? If you learn one it might make you more marketable in the short term, but wouldn't the concepts and principles still apply?
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Old 02-03-2014, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Mt. Lebanon
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Java. Close to C++ but managed. You don;t want to expose your kids to memory management, pointers and leaks.
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Old 02-03-2014, 05:01 PM
 
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Once you learn one, i would be much much easier to learn the second one. Programming is not about the language. it's about if you can think and solve the problem or not.

That's why in Google or Micosoft's job posting, the requirements look like this "XXX years Object Orientated Programming in languages such as C#, C++ or Java";
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Old 02-03-2014, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Santa Rosa
486 posts, read 615,468 times
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Take a look at what the local college is teaching and try to teach a slower/easier version of that.
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Old 02-03-2014, 07:08 PM
 
37,072 posts, read 38,367,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
I have a question; as someone who has never learned a word of code or programming language, and regrets it, is it important that you learn a programming language or that you learn a specific programming language.
Different languages are going to have different things the are designed to do. A better comparison is to tools, perhaps you have two hammers. A regular hammer and sledge, you can pound in finishing nails with a sledge but not exaclty ideal if you can use a regular hammer. You may be able to get from point A to point B with two different ones but the one designed for that purpose is going to make it whole lot easier. PHP as mentione is a server side language, this forum uses PHP. There is lot of built in variables and functions that are solely for web development. They may also work wht other common applications used on a web server, for example ImageMagick is a standalone program that can be used to manipulate images server side. There is lot of built in functionality within PHP for ImageMagick


Quote:
In terms of learning a linguistic language, learning one will greatly make learning a second and third easier. I would imagine the concepts are the same, no?
Very much, what varies is the syntax and the specialties.
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Old 02-03-2014, 08:11 PM
 
6,842 posts, read 4,432,293 times
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Fortran. Seriously, Fortran. Why learn an "ancient" language that's totally irrelevant to the internet or to consumer applications? First, because it teaches the basics of programming without the mumbo-jumbo of professional programming. Second, because a huge fraction of our engineering software is still written in Fortran. I wouldn't be surprised if those programs remain in use in the 22nd century - which probably can't be said for python-perl-html-whatever. And third, because an "obsolete" language teaches the mechanics of language, just like learning Latin or Greek teaches the mechanics of grammar and vocabulary-building.
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