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Old 03-28-2014, 11:41 PM
 
Location: SoCal
5,716 posts, read 4,315,668 times
Reputation: 1855

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Hopefully this is the correct place to ask about this.

Anyway, this one forum member here previously criticized and ridiculed me for wanting to get cryogenically preserved after I die (I am currently 21 years old, so hopefully I still have a lot of time left to live) and said that my desires and wishes in regards to this show that I don't understand science or something such as this (Note: I genuinely do not know how well this forum member here genuinely understands the science in regards to cryogenic preservation). That said, while I myself am not an expert on this topic, I do know that some people who appear to be pretty knowledgeable in regards to this say that cryogenic preservation might be successful if it is done right now and/or if it is done a couple of/several decades from now with better technology.

Thus, I would like the ask this specific question to the people on this forum who are knowledgeable about science and about the science behind cryogenic preservation: Which viewpoint here appears to be more likely to be true, in your honest opinion? Can cryogenic preservation be at least mostly successful (in your honest opinion) if it is done right now? What about if it is done in several decades?

For the record, I am only talking about the cryogenic preservation of humans here.

And Yes, this is genuinely a completely serious question. I would please like to know and to learn much more about this topic.
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Old 03-29-2014, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Ohio
2,801 posts, read 1,735,807 times
Reputation: 1641
Research what happens to animal cells when they are frozen, you will have your answer.
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Old 03-29-2014, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
16,936 posts, read 51,623,828 times
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The only successes I am aware of are on low mass plants or animals, and those that have natural "antifreeze." Large and complex means too many possible points of failure.
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Old 03-29-2014, 11:39 AM
 
Location: SoCal
5,716 posts, read 4,315,668 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyMack View Post
Research what happens to animal cells when they are frozen, you will have your answer.
Despite the fact that it has often been referred to as "freezing", cryogenic preservation is not actual freezing, though.
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Old 03-29-2014, 11:40 AM
 
Location: SoCal
5,716 posts, read 4,315,668 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
1. The only successes I am aware of are on low mass plants or animals, and those that have natural "antifreeze."

2. Large and complex means too many possible points of failure.
1. Do you have some sources for this?

2. Couldn't future advances in technology try successfully dealing with this, though?
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Old 03-29-2014, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
16,936 posts, read 51,623,828 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Futurist110 View Post
1. Do you have some sources for this?

2. Couldn't future advances in technology try successfully dealing with this, though?
1. You are asking for proof of a negative. I am aware of a few successful small plants and animals (and sperm and eggs) successfully reviving after the process. I have not seen any reports of larger flora and fauna having been "revived." Therefore, I can cite reports I haven't seen.

2. I tend to doubt it. It apparently requires even heating throughout a mass without disruption of it.
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Old 04-04-2014, 02:34 PM
Zot
 
Location: 3rd rock from a nearby star
468 posts, read 562,171 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Futurist110 View Post

Thus, I would like the ask this specific question to the people on this forum who are knowledgeable about science and about the science behind cryogenic preservation: Which viewpoint here appears to be more likely to be true, in your honest opinion? Can cryogenic preservation be at least mostly successful (in your honest opinion) if it is done right now? What about if it is done in several decades?
Aside from a singular personal experience in a 1973 Toyota which broke down outside Quebec, I'd answer generally not at this time, and to always double check your gas before departing Quebec in the winter when it's 40 below.
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