U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-11-2014, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Lead/Deadwood, SD
948 posts, read 2,266,941 times
Reputation: 854

Advertisements

I can't count the number of garages up here in South Dakota with running freezers and freezer frige combos in them. FYI its snowing out right now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-11-2014, 03:10 PM
 
Location: God's Gift to Mankind for flying anything
5,162 posts, read 10,475,839 times
Reputation: 3969
Quote:
Originally Posted by Albert_The_Crocodile View Post
That's true, but in a dual unit, that can present problems. The temperature control sensor is in the refrigerator portion of the appliance, so if the ambient temperature is in the 30s, the unit may shut off - and your frozen food will thaw.
Wrong assumption.

Consider the situation.

Food in one container at 40 degrees
Food in one container at 30 degrees
Ambient at let's say 20 degrees. (The OP mentioned temps in the *teens* !)

With that *outside* temperature, the food in any container will never get *warmer*.
*Heat* (that is what humans call it) can only go from a high temperature to the low temperature.

Therefore, in the above situation, the *latent heat* that is *in* BOTH refrigerator compartments will slow but sure go towards the outside, way lower, temperature area.
Sooner or later, all the material in the fridge will be at the outside low temperature.
Keep in mind that a fridge never *heats up* any *inside the fridge* area ! !!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2014, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Ohio
14,311 posts, read 12,569,286 times
Reputation: 19017
I bought a small Kenmore freezer, one of those that is half the size of a normal stand up freezer, in 2003 because I was having foot surgery and I wanted to stock up on food.

It has been in my unheated garage ever since and is doing just fine.

We get pretty cold winters here in NE Ohio, especially last winter.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2014, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
8,185 posts, read 21,741,076 times
Reputation: 6116
Quote:
Originally Posted by swagger View Post
If the inside of the garage reaches those temps, your refrigerator will become a freezer. They're built to cool things, not warm them, so there's no way for it to increase the temperature inside the box.
I have lived in Minnesota, Maine, and Massachusetts. Even where I live in Maryland I get winter temps in the teens. I have never once heard of, or seen, anyone have any problems with freezers/fridges in [unheated] garages.

You mention the home is 13 years old...and the freezer probably just as old. Is the freezer currently working? If so, that answers your question.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2014, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Caverns measureless to man...
6,704 posts, read 4,165,907 times
Reputation: 14935
Quote:
Originally Posted by irman View Post
Wrong assumption.

Consider the situation.

Food in one container at 40 degrees
Food in one container at 30 degrees
Ambient at let's say 20 degrees. (The OP mentioned temps in the *teens* !)

With that *outside* temperature, the food in any container will never get *warmer*.
*Heat* (that is what humans call it) can only go from a high temperature to the low temperature.

Therefore, in the above situation, the *latent heat* that is *in* BOTH refrigerator compartments will slow but sure go towards the outside, way lower, temperature area.
Sooner or later, all the material in the fridge will be at the outside low temperature.
Keep in mind that a fridge never *heats up* any *inside the fridge* area ! !!!
Right. But the problem is, the food in the freezer is typically not at 30 degrees - it's at 0 degrees, or below. When the ambient temperature is in a range that's roughly in the 30s, the unit is likely to shut off because the ambient temperature is below the threshold for the temperature sensor located in the refrigerator. If the ambient temperature remains in that range long enough, the food in the freezer will warm to that ambient temperature, and thaw.

Additionally, though, even at temperatures below 32 (in the 20s and teens), the food in the freezer will still remain frozen, but not at the optimum temperature for longterm storage of frozen foods - at or below 0 degrees Fahrenheit. If the garage is in the teens or 20s for several months, and the refrigerator/freezer remains off the entire time, frozen foods will not keep as long. And, of course, at those temperatures, the food in the refrigerator will eventually freeze. Which is not always an ideal outcome.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2014, 09:11 PM
 
Location: NW Penna.
1,756 posts, read 3,042,121 times
Reputation: 1845
^ That's what happens with the refrigerator/freezer on my back porch. At the coldest part of the year, I just unplug it. Freezer food must come inside to keep it frozen. And pop must come in to prevent it from freezing. Which reminds me that I've got a bunch of leftover stuff in that fridge that I should just go throw out tomorrow. Preparedness. lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-15-2014, 02:15 PM
 
Location: God's Gift to Mankind for flying anything
5,162 posts, read 10,475,839 times
Reputation: 3969
Quote:
Originally Posted by Albert_The_Crocodile View Post
the food in the freezer is typically not at 30 degrees - it's at 0 degrees, or below.
Really ?
Are you sure the stuff in your freezer is at that low of a temperature ?

If it is, then the freezer will still continue to keep anything in the freezer, at the temperature,
even with an ambient of above ZERO degrees !
The freezer will keep the temps inside the freezer at whatever temperature it is set for,
even when at zero as in your case !

When the ambient reaches the same temperature as what your freezer is set for,
then the cooling/freezing cycle will stop.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2014, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Caverns measureless to man...
6,704 posts, read 4,165,907 times
Reputation: 14935
Quote:
Originally Posted by irman View Post

Really ?
Are you sure the stuff in your freezer is at that low of a temperature ?
Yes.


Quote:
Originally Posted by irman View Post

If it is, then the freezer will still continue to keep anything in the freezer, at the temperature,
even with an ambient of above ZERO degrees !
The freezer will keep the temps inside the freezer at whatever temperature it is set for,
even when at zero as in your case !
No. It will not. Because the freezer will not even be running if the ambient temperature is too low.

I don't think you're following what I've been saying. Maybe I'm not explaining it very well. Let me see if you understand it better when someone else explains it...

Quote:
For a refrigerator located in the garage, where the air temperature gets much colder (below 55 degrees), the thermostat does not sense a rise in outside air temperature and therefore, never kicks the compressor on. Because the compressor does not come on, cold air is never produced in the freezer. The temperature in your freezer rises and begins to thaw out all your frozen foods.
Link


Does that help?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2014, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
7,142 posts, read 8,432,439 times
Reputation: 7702
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnhw2 View Post
In the mountains of New Mexico at an elevation of 9700 feet above sea level can a freezer or refrigerator survive in an un heated garage where temps in the teens are common in the winter and zero is possible? The freezer is upright and about 18 cubic feet in size if that matters. Thanks in advance.
You should probably refer to the owners manual for the operating temperature range of the unit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2014, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Ohio
14,311 posts, read 12,569,286 times
Reputation: 19017
Quote:

For a refrigerator located in the garage, where the air temperature gets much
colder (below 55 degrees), the thermostat does not sense a rise in outside air
temperature and therefore, never kicks the compressor on. Because the compressor
does not come on, cold air is never produced in the freezer. The temperature in
your freezer rises and begins to thaw out all your frozen foods.


I have never had that happen.

I guess ignorance is bliss.

I just put my little freezer out in the garage and never gave it a second thought.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top