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Old 12-26-2014, 12:59 AM
 
4,983 posts, read 7,762,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DPolo View Post
So I agree with the fun at Nasa's expense, you have not found life on Mars yet, so where have you been looking ?
Where would you suggest looking? Curiosity's mission is to look for past or present conditions that Mars could have been suitable for the formation of life, unless a Martian Mermaid happens to jump out and do a dance in front of the rover's cameras. Personally, I have no idea if there is any life on Mars now, or if there ever was. But if any life, even if it's only bacterial, were to be actually confirmed to have independently evolved there, either in the distant past or existing now, it would certainly make a big statement adding to our knowledge considering the only model we currently have for a planet with any life is the Earth.
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Old 12-26-2014, 01:20 AM
 
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Originally Posted by 303Guy View Post
We have life right here on earth that does not need water. Leave a can of petrol out for a few years and see what happens to it. Bacteria turns it into a turpentine like substance (smelling and looking). Not mineral turps but real thing. Diesel needs additives to kill bacteria that grows in it, blocking filters.
Fuel contains organic compounds which are used for food. There is moisture in the air and that is where the water is coming from. This will be of particular concern in a tank becsue it will condensate on the wall of the tank.
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Old 12-26-2014, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
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So those bacteria still need some water? Thanks. But not a lot so running water is not a prerequisite for them. I would tend to think then that those organisms originally evolved in water. Would that be correct?
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Old 12-26-2014, 02:48 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 303Guy View Post
So those bacteria still need some water? Thanks. But not a lot so running water is not a prerequisite for them. I would tend to think then that those organisms originally evolved in water. Would that be correct?

AFAIK every life form on earth requires water and it certainly would have been an important if not the most important catalyst for life to begin. It's a solvent and the capability to break things down is important.
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Old 12-27-2014, 01:30 AM
 
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
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Life is a fascinating concept. During the carboniferous period when all the coalfields were laid down, there were no wood 'eating' bacteria to rot it so it stayed around long enough to form coal. All the oxygen in our atmosphere (or most of it) was produced by stromatolites and before that there were no oxygen 'breathing' micro-organisms. But there was always water.
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Old 12-27-2014, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Greater NYC, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
Where would you suggest looking? Curiosity's mission is to look for past or present conditions that Mars could have been suitable for the formation of life, unless a Martian Mermaid happens to jump out and do a dance in front of the rover's cameras. Personally, I have no idea if there is any life on Mars now, or if there ever was. But if any life, even if it's only bacterial, were to be actually confirmed to have independently evolved there, either in the distant past or existing now, it would certainly make a big statement adding to our knowledge considering the only model we currently have for a planet with any life is the Earth.
There is so much life on Earth, I find it very hard to believe that the rest of the solar system is deprived of life.


I find that by just googling, it's hard to tell which source is credible and which is not.
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Old 12-27-2014, 11:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by DPolo View Post
There is so much life on Earth, I find it very hard to believe that the rest of the solar system is deprived of life.


I find that by just googling, it's hard to tell which source is credible and which is not.
I wouldn't be surprised that there may be life in a few spots in the solar system, but we currently have no idea if there is life elsewhere or not. You said, "...you have not found life on Mars yet, so where have you been looking ?" I don't understand what you mean by that. Do you think the MSL should have somehow found life by now? You're right, we haven't found any life on Mars yet. As I said, the MSL rover *Curiosity" was not designed to find life. It's to search for evidence of conditions that could have been suitable for life to get a start.

Among other things, it has found evidence that Gale Crater probably contained a lot of water in the past. That implies that Mars had liquid water in it's past. Organic compounds have also been found, although that doesn't automatically mean life did in fact emerge on Mars. The question is whether Mars was warm long enough and wet enough for life to get a start. We don't really know the answer to that, but the line of thinking is to "follow the water". With regard to other places around the solar system, Mars is probably the easiest to explore. Even though Mars is a cold desert planet, the possibility that Mars might have had microscopic life, or maybe still does, has not been ruled out yet.

I agree, there is a lot of crap that shows up on the internet. What sources have you been looking at that you are unsure if it's credible or not?
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Old 12-28-2014, 12:37 AM
 
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There is no doubt there is life beside us in the universe. The much more interesting question is whether there is intelligent life beside us.
(Btw this may belong to the Space subforum)
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Old 12-28-2014, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Limbo
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Yes, absolutely. The vastness of the universe lends itself to the likelihood of other life being 'out there.' There is probably life, and perhaps intelligent life, in other universes, too.
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Old 12-28-2014, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
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How is intelligent life defined?
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